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Boat dealers Cheating on trailer overhang??

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Boat dealers Cheating on trailer overhang??

Old 06-08-2015, 04:45 AM
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Default Boat dealers Cheating on trailer overhang??

is there any industry standard on how much the wood beams that the boat sits on can overhang the metal "back end" of the trailer frame??

I see wood beams that really extend past the metal trailer frame and hey - some of the beams are hefty but how far out is too far out?

Boat dealers cheating by using an undersized trailer?
Old 06-08-2015, 06:51 AM
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The end of the wood is usually 4' to 5' from the center of the rear axle. The amount of aluminum is mostly cosmetic. Some people have copied the myco style and take the aluminum all the way back and some people end the aluminum at the last cross member.
Old 06-08-2015, 06:07 PM
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most trailers down here are 2' too short
Old 06-08-2015, 08:03 PM
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Conventional wisdom is the boat should be supported all the way to the transom. Conventional wisdom also is that a trailer that doesn't is undersized for the boat or set up incorrectly, weight capacit may or may not be sufficient. Experience is trailers are sometimes less of a consideration than they should be ...
Old 06-09-2015, 06:13 AM
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well some are supported at the transom, but by a wood beam that sticks out in the air past the metal trailer frame
Old 06-10-2015, 05:29 AM
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In addition to the support consideration the other aspect is where the frame ends is where the lights are. If you have 4 to 5 foot of bunk and boat hanging aft past the frame often the lights are pretty obscured.
Old 06-10-2015, 08:00 AM
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If the bunks are the right length and properly supported by the trailer frame and/or cross members the overhang is immaterial. As previously mentioned the trailer lights need to be clearly visible from the sides and rear with the boat loaded. Some folks choose to mount the trailer lights on top of the trailer guides. That keeps them out of the water and makes them clearly visible as well.
Old 06-11-2015, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Butch Davis View Post
If the bunks are the right length and properly supported by the trailer frame and/or cross members the overhang is immaterial. As previously mentioned the trailer lights need to be clearly visible from the sides and rear with the boat loaded. Some folks choose to mount the trailer lights on top of the trailer guides. That keeps them out of the water and makes them clearly visible as well.
If we are talking aluminum bunks, then not so bad assuming they are of sufficient size.

Wood bunks would be more iffy..............
The bunks would have to be sufficient to support the load placed on the very end of them way out there at 4 or 5 feet. Then think of that 5 foot lever out there with twin 250's on a bracket and the trailer going over bumps and into potholes. I can hear the wood fibers snapping.
Better be some hefty good quality cypress or oak, etc. that will stay straight.
Because 4x6 treated pine ain't gonna cut it especially if the bunks warp away from where they are needed.

But that huge overhang of wood makes for good sacrificial skids when traversing ditches and sloped drives etc.
Old 06-11-2015, 05:20 PM
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We don’t pay attention to what other builders do so I’ll only comment on why we bring our frame to the back of the transom. It’s all about a perfect fit with 6” of flat bunk surface sitting flat against the hull for the full length of the bunk. Adding a rear cross member direct under the transom lets us use a 4x6 bunk that’s much stronger than 2x6’s and still gives us enough flex to slightly change our bunk height and angle to match the forward changing hull curvature.
Most V bottom boats change shape from cross member to cross member so it’s very important to us to use a bunk that can flex enough to match the hull shape perfectly. In the end, this gives a true glove like fit that doesn’t leave edges of the bunks gouging and wearing into the gelcoat.
The design is all about better support.
On many models, we bring the frame past the transom running surface just to put tie downs where they can actually be used and lights where they can be seen.

Few example pics.

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All 40 of the welded bunk brackets here have a slight difference in height and angle from cross member to cross member to follow the exact shape of the hull perfectly. This is why some trailer builders fit boats from simple measurements kept on file and builders like us build from mechanical jig fixtures that are fitted from an actual hull.
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Last edited by Kevin Desselle; 06-11-2015 at 05:40 PM.
Old 06-11-2015, 05:27 PM
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I see a lot of "attention to detail" in your trailers, well done and thought out.
Like the vertical pieces added in above the cross members.
Old 06-11-2015, 06:23 PM
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Sport Trail by far the best out there. Once you own one you won't settle for anything else.

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