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Towing large boats

Old 06-03-2010, 11:15 PM
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I pull my oceanmaster every weekend 40 miles each way - my only reccomendation would be to go slow and get a diesel - my truck gets aweful, mileage - btw my boat is 10'3" wide but ussually doesnt get noticed as it fits well on its trailer.
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Old 06-21-2010, 01:25 PM
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I have a trailer just been using for instate hauling of my boat. I am going to trailer from MA to WI next month.

It has surge hydraulic brakes on both axles for a 25 foot boat. Are those brakes OK for the states along the route?

Thanks.

Dana
Old 02-20-2019, 05:34 PM
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Default Towing large boats

Towing a 28' Bayliner with a 9'10" beam from Virginia to Washington state.
All systems work on the trailer - brakes, lights, breakaway - it is a 3-axle trailer.
I will keep LONG distances from the vehicle ahead of me.
Since I have never trailered a boat of this size, but am a very experienced driver of smaller, dual axle trailers, what should I be aware of - I will be VERY careful and alert, as I am not in a hurry to "get there".
Boat weighs 7,400#.
I will be driving an F-350 diesel p/u.
I see most replies have said they do not bother with wide-load permits - anyone know what the penalty is for not having one is? Fine, impound, etc?
Any and all suggestions will be welcomed.
Old 02-20-2019, 05:41 PM
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When are you doing this?
Old 02-20-2019, 05:45 PM
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Default Towing large boats

I will tow this Bayliner in either March or April
Old 02-20-2019, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Chev View Post
Towing a 28' Bayliner with a 9'10" beam from Virginia to Washington state.
All systems work on the trailer - brakes, lights, breakaway - it is a 3-axle trailer.
I will keep LONG distances from the vehicle ahead of me.
Since I have never trailered a boat of this size, but am a very experienced driver of smaller, dual axle trailers, what should I be aware of - I will be VERY careful and alert, as I am not in a hurry to "get there".
Boat weighs 7,400#.
I will be driving an F-350 diesel p/u.
I see most replies have said they do not bother with wide-load permits - anyone know what the penalty is for not having one is? Fine, impound, etc?
Any and all suggestions will be welcomed.
I tow our Monterey 335 (10í11Ē beam) all over the place with my 450, 5000 miles in the last 8 months. My advice above all normal towing check list items is the following:

- get permits, they are easy and cheap insurance. If you get in a wreck and God forbid someone is hurt, their lawyer will try to find anything to put the liability on you. That being said, in 5,000 miles and passing 100ís of cops, Iíve yet to be bothered. So while you may be able to get away with it, itís not worth it.

- Drive with headlights on, itís a law for wide loads

- get the proper flags and signs, again for liability

- stay in the slow lane except to pass. Nothing is more butt puckering than being passed by a semi on each side with a wide boat

- check your state laws to make sure you are licensed properly for your weight. I doubt you will be over 26k lbs but double check


Again, this is just stuff above normal towing items. Iím sure there is more that Iím not thinking of but Iíll post back if I think of anything.
Old 02-20-2019, 08:06 PM
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Thank you for this information - it is very useful and yes, if anything else comes to mind, let me know!
Old 02-20-2019, 08:54 PM
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Just put airbags in your RAV4. Youíll be fine.
Old 02-22-2019, 11:05 AM
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After a long career in the boat biz Iíve got hundreds of thousand miles with a trailer in the mirrors. Everything from a 44í box trailer full of raceboats, to a JetSki.

Big rig towing is something you just learn with experience. Some thoughts:

1) The right equipment for the job. More trailer than you need, and the proper truck, tie downs, and tires are worth their weight in gold when you are forced to make an ugly evasive move. You havenít truly puckered until you fully locked up 60 ft of truck and trailer.

2) Eyes moving all the time. Constant mirror scan becomes an unconcious habit. But when someone does something stupid you want to know whatís around you and where the ďoutĒ is. If you have to look itís too late.

3) Someone is always going to do something stupid.

4) Every time you are out of the truck, do a walk around. Your hand is a great heat gun - if you touch a hub and donít pull back and go ďshit!Ē youíre fine.

5) Run with lights on all the time.

6) Carry tools, spare, and spare hub. Because I carry them, and maintain equipment, I never need them.

7) Think ahead. Donít go into somewhere you donít have an obvious exit from. Donít be that guy who tryís to take 60 ft into the Wendyís drive thru.

8) Slow and steady . Drive for conditions. There are places to run hard, and places to pick a lane and stay there letting it happen around you. In busy urban the second lane from the right is your friend. Far right has to fight the enter and exit traffic and you become an obstruction.

10) Just do it! I tow big and wide and donít really even think about it - just takes miles and experience. The only way to be comfortable is to get out there and do it.

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Old 02-22-2019, 02:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Linesiders bar+grill View Post
How many of you tow large boats? If so what do you tow and what are you towing it with? Right now I'm towing a 24 foot walk around cabin and while is not hard, its not the easiest thing either. The boats in the slip, but when I make trips to a favorite vacation spot or the offshore grounds, I put it on the trailer and tow, saving 60-80 miles each way. This saves a bundle on gas, makes for easier planning with the weather, less wear and tear on me and the boat.
My issue is that I want to go bigger, but I don't want to lose the ability to tow. Is a 28 foot walk around cabin too big? too much of a hassle to put on a trailer to save 60-80 miles each way? Should I be looking at center consoles, are they easier because of less beam?

Your thoughts, input and experiences are appreciated, thanks.
When I was growing up my parents always towed their boats (24' - 34'), so it never occurred to me to do it any other way. These days, The Admiral and I trailer a 28' by 10' wide Doral, from 10 to 300 miles per weekend, depending on where we put in. Fully loaded she is about 14k lbs. (the boat, not The Admiral). We have an 02' Duramax that does a fantastic job with it.

Towing a decent-sized boat can be done solo....but it's way easier with two sets of eyes. And launching/loading is WAAAAY easier when the whole family gets into it. After a half-season, everyone understands how the process works, and what they need to be doing to make sure the boat does not fall off the trailer.

Design59 gave you a great list above, I would just add two more things:

11) Keep an eye on the on-ramps ahead of you for merging traffic.
12) Keep an eye above you for low-hanging branches whenever you leave the freeway
13) Don't ever hesitate to repeat a step, or double-check your work. For example: you pull the boat out of the water, and realize you needed to come forward two more inches. Don't hesitate to dunk it one more time, and get that alignment perfect.

Good luck, don't be afraid to ask for help, and have fun.
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Old 02-23-2019, 12:27 PM
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And BE SURE when you pull in some where for food, fuel, etc you have an out. You don"t want to back a rig like that out of a place because you get stuck.
Old 02-23-2019, 03:20 PM
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Almost got stuck today. New setup is definitely a A to B setup.
Old 02-23-2019, 05:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Linesiders bar+grill View Post
How many of you tow large boats? If so what do you tow and what are you towing it with? Right now I'm towing a 24 foot walk around cabin and while is not hard, its not the easiest thing either. The boats in the slip, but when I make trips to a favorite vacation spot or the offshore grounds, I put it on the trailer and tow, saving 60-80 miles each way. This saves a bundle on gas, makes for easier planning with the weather, less wear and tear on me and the boat.
My issue is that I want to go bigger, but I don't want to lose the ability to tow. Is a 28 foot walk around cabin too big? too much of a hassle to put on a trailer to save 60-80 miles each way? Should I be looking at center consoles, are they easier because of less beam?

Your thoughts, input and experiences are appreciated, thanks.

The largest i've towed was a 25' center console with an 88 F350. No longer than 50 or 60 miles. Trailer made that about a 28' rig to tow. Currently I pull a 22.5' dual console with a 07 F150 with a 4.6 v8. The trailer is about 27Ft. Boat, trailer and gear about 7k LBS loaded. I pull it from S Carolina to South MS and then make trips back with it 2 or 3 times a year.

Regarding Length, keep in mind your trailer will be longer than the boat by a few feet. Might be difficult if you are having to maneuver in tight areas. Launches are another consideration. Can they handle a larger boat / trailer.

Width is the consideration regarding states with wide load requirements. Also, consider width if your traveling like I am through cities like Atlanta. My trailer is 95" wide for that reason - for the extra wiggle room.

At the end of the day, regarding size to tow, First, I would say keep it in the legal limits so you dont have to worry about that hassle.
Second, whats the largest you can tow and be relaxed while towing? For me, and my long journeys, its exactly what I have. I wouldn't have an issue towing larger, but, I know it would add to my stress level a little - which, I really wouldn't want lol.

I always go 55 or 60. When towing, I am not particularly worried about breaking any record time.
hope this helps.
Jacob.
Old 02-24-2019, 03:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Linesiders bar+grill View Post
Thanks for the reponses, they brought me some insight which I did not consider. I have a great tow vehicle which I want to utilize, and I will be saving a bundle on gas when I opt to fish offshore as I have to leave Long Island Sound. t500hps, that boats insanse. I was considering a 28 footer.

Anyone towing a 28 Grady White on a regular basis?
I bought my 282 Grady White Sailfish last spring while I still had my 2010 F-150 with the towing package (rated for around 11,000 if I remember correctly). I towed it a handful of times around town (mostly back forth to shops, unfortunately) but kept my boat wet slipped during most of that time. The 282 is a heavy boat and with some fuel in the tanks was definitely pushing the limits on the F-150. I found out the hard way that the hydraulic surge brakes weren't functioning properly so stopping had to be planned for well in advance.

A few months ago I bought a 2017 F-250 Powerstroke and, of course, it's much better suited for towing. I'm not saying it "slings the 28' all over the road" or anything like that but a huge improvement when compared to the F-150. I wouldn't hesitate to tow the 28' Sailfish long distance with the new truck. I agree with a lot of other previous posts on things to watch out for. Towing big boats is just like anything else in life. The more you do it, the more comfortable you will get until it's just kind of second nature.

One of the best things about upgrading from a 22' GW Seafarer to the 282 GW Sailfish was that I was able to convince my wife that towing with the F-150 was just not safe anymore and really needed to upgrade to a diesel, that also happened to be my dream truck ; ).
Old 02-25-2019, 08:46 AM
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Here's my set-up. Towed this boat about 600 miles with a half ton and just didn't have the warm and comfies so I bought this old Cummins. It isn't going to win any races but put it in 1st gear and feather out the clutch and she moves the load very well.
Old 02-27-2019, 04:40 PM
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Old 02-27-2019, 04:54 PM
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I purchased a boat and towed from Michigan to Washington. I had proper permits, but never needed them. I was never pulled over or even asked about them. That said, I would always recommend pulling them just for the insurance factor. I did have flags and signs. I will change the arrangement of these for my home states as the requirements are different than the rest of the states I traveled through.

It's really no big deal pulling a larger load other than the fuel economy hit. If you are over 10', things get a bit tougher. Otherwise, watch others and plan well ahead. Common sense goes a long ways.




Dave
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Old 03-02-2019, 09:35 PM
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There are companies to pull the permits for you, for a reasonable fee.
Old 03-02-2019, 09:38 PM
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Originally Posted by c1steve View Post
There are companies to pull the permits for you, for a reasonable fee.
I had a couple of companies quote mine. It eased going to cost about 30% of the total.

I read allthe to do it all online. But it did take some research.

Dave
Old 03-02-2019, 09:48 PM
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Iíve never used a company to pull my permits. Itís very easy to do online yourself.

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