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GM 2500 to tow 10k lb 5th wheel

Old 05-01-2021, 12:20 PM
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Default GM 2500 to tow 10k lb 5th wheel

Hello all,

I have purchased a 36' 5th wheel 10k lbs. and will be towing it from Az. to Ak. and will be purchasing a GM truck to tow it with. I am considering a 2019 Chevy 2500HD with a 6.6 Duramax and would like to hear from folks who have used a 2500 to tow a 10k lb. 5th wheel before and their advice.

Thank you all,

Tony F.
Old 05-01-2021, 01:18 PM
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Will it pull it? Of course. Will you be overweight? Probably.

The 10k lb is probably unloaded. You'll want to know the GVWR and pin weight of your trailer. Then you'll want to get a truck with enough payload capacity. That'll probably put you in a 3500 and maybe DRW.
Old 05-01-2021, 02:28 PM
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Thank you K-dawg, here is the info on the trailer, I suppose a 1 ton would be better to haul it with,

what about bed length? does it have to be an 8' bed?
Old 05-01-2021, 02:38 PM
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My 05 2500HD with the 6.0 gas engine can tow 10k, especially on a fifth wheel. You won't have any issues. But, as was posted previously, it's not dry weight that's your concern. 10k fifth wheel is light these days. 36' fifth wheel that's 10k? What is that, an empty enclosed trailer? My 24 foot bumper pull enclosed weighs 5k empty, better recheck that GVWR. Think that 0 is actually an 8 (as in 18k).

Edit: Yeah, 14,060. Too heavy IMO but I'll let the newer diesel boys chime in on that one.
Old 05-01-2021, 02:59 PM
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Originally Posted by kingsfisherman View Post
Thank you K-dawg, here is the info on the trailer, I suppose a 1 ton would be better to haul it with,

what about bed length? does it have to be an 8' bed?
The pin weight on that thing is probably at least 2500lb.

No idea on the bed length. I see a lot of short-bed trucks towing 5th wheels, but the newer ones are more short-bed friendly.
Old 05-01-2021, 07:42 PM
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You will likely be over your payload capacity, which will be less than 2,000. So he sure to check the pin weight on that thing - if I remember correctly, usually 20% of the trailer weight, which puts you over.
Old 05-01-2021, 10:32 PM
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Our 5th-wheel toy hauler is 40' long and has a GVWR of 15k. Our usual load-out is around 13,500. It's a tri-axle trailer with a pin weight of about 2500 lbs (depending on how much Captain we have aboard).

Our 2002 2500hd Duramax has a payload capacity of 3600 lbs, and a 5th wheel tow rating of 15,100 lbs. I added air bags to it over the winter, which really improved the ride and control. We're very happy with how the truck handles the load. Wouldn't mind a bit more power, but only miss it in the mountains.

The truck you're considering, a 2019, is quite a bit more capable than our old rig. Having towed a comparable load, my opinion is that you'll be just fine.


Last edited by Captain_0bvious; 05-01-2021 at 10:38 PM.
Old 05-01-2021, 10:41 PM
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Originally Posted by SouthpawHD View Post
You will likely be over your payload capacity, which will be less than 2,000. So he sure to check the pin weight on that thing - if I remember correctly, usually 20% of the trailer weight, which puts you over.
Why do you think the payload capacity will be less than 2,000lbs?
Old 05-02-2021, 10:45 AM
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You will be fine with the GMC.
Old 05-03-2021, 06:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Captain_0bvious View Post
Why do you think the payload capacity will be less than 2,000lbs?
The payload sticker on the door will show somewhere between 2,000 and 2,300 lbs. it’s artificially low to keep the truck at 10K GVWR. For the initial dry trip, that rig will probably be around 12,500 given a GVWR of 14K. No way a 36’ trailer is only 10K. I have a 29.5 HT, which is Jayco’s “half-ton” 5th wheel and it weighs in ready to camp at a tick under 11K with about 2,200 on the pin. That truck will be level or a little squat under the OP’s trailer. The 3500 has overload springs to handle this kind of weight. I’d tow it home and stop by the scales to see what it really weighs
Old 05-03-2021, 08:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Shall36 View Post
The payload sticker on the door will show somewhere between 2,000 and 2,300 lbs. it’s artificially low to keep the truck at 10K GVWR.
https://media.gmc.com/media/us/en/gm...2019.tab1.html
Mfr says 2300-2800 with the duramax. So it is not as much margin as I thought. Especially with a few passengers.

Originally Posted by Shall36 View Post
No way a 36’ trailer is only 10K. .....I’d tow it home and stop by the scales to see what it really weighs
I'm curious to know too? But, ours is 40' and 11,500 dry. The numbers he quoted seem possible to me
Old 05-03-2021, 08:31 PM
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Definitely think it’s doable. Our 40ft Jayco north point was 15k dry. If your really at 10-12k full than your 2500 can do it fine. A 3500 would be a safer option if it was me behind the wheel tho.
Old 05-03-2021, 09:02 PM
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Thank you all for the replies, I will be looking to get a GM 3500 some where near Yuma to bring it home. Thanks again guys
Old 05-04-2021, 06:30 AM
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We use a F350 SRW with upgraded springs. Not a fan of driving dually's on a daily basis. But if all you're doing with it is towing then the DRW would be a better choice.
Old 05-04-2021, 07:11 AM
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For what its worth, I own a 2018 Ram 2500 w/cummins. I own a 39ft 5th wheel. I pull it everywhere with no issues. I rarely go over 60mph. Camper has good brakes as well. My truck is bone stock. I haven't pulled mine across country, but, have pulled it 8-9 hrs one way without any issues. I think my camper is closer to 15k. Pulls and stops really good. I have been towing boats for over 30 yrs, so I feel comfortable with it. Just my advice.
Old 05-04-2021, 07:28 AM
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guess im missing something? when the duramax is set up correctly the 2500 can be anywhere up to 18k pounds.

how are yall getting that a new 2500 duramax is not rated for 10k-12k lbs?
Old 05-04-2021, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Shall36 View Post
The payload sticker on the door will show somewhere between 2,000 and 2,300 lbs. it’s artificially low to keep the truck at 10K GVWR. For the initial dry trip, that rig will probably be around 12,500 given a GVWR of 14K. No way a 36’ trailer is only 10K. I have a 29.5 HT, which is Jayco’s “half-ton” 5th wheel and it weighs in ready to camp at a tick under 11K with about 2,200 on the pin. That truck will be level or a little squat under the OP’s trailer. The 3500 has overload springs to handle this kind of weight. I’d tow it home and stop by the scales to see what it really weighs
I just went to the website because I didn't think this sounded right. I built a 2021 LTZ 2500 4wd diesel crew and it shows a GVW of 11,350. Why do you say they limit the gvw to 10K? Is this an area/state reg?

My old 2005 2500HD diesel has a payload of 2900lbs.
Old 05-04-2021, 08:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Jonboater View Post
I just went to the website because I didn't think this sounded right. I built a 2021 LTZ 2500 4wd diesel crew and it shows a GVW of 11,350. Why do you say they limit the gvw to 10K? Is this an area/state reg?

My old 2005 2500HD diesel has a payload of 2900lbs.
Some trucks are "artificially" down rated on purpose to avoid triggering CDL requirements in certain situations. See similar on a lot of trailers. For instance I have a trailer that's tagged as being a GVWR of 9,990, which is identical in every way to one stamped at 14K from the same manufacturer other than the tag stamp. If you look at the "build my own" or whatever they call it on the GM site there is a 10K GVWR option for the SRW 2500's & 3500's.
Old 05-04-2021, 09:06 AM
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I don't know where these numbers are coming from.

I have a 2003 F250 SuperDuty Crewcab 2x4 with the 7.3 engine and a tuner. My truck with a fifth wheel has a maximum tow capacity of 13,200 lbs. and a 3,000 lb. kingpin weight. And my truck has heavier springs than most 3/4 ton trucks.

My Grand Design Reflection mid weight 36' fifth wheel weighs 11,000 lbs. dry, and it has a 2,000 lb. kingpin weight dry. And my truck is maxed out.after my "stuff" is in the trailer. And we don't necessarily travel heavy either.

Most full size fifth wheel trailers will weigh 14,000 lbs. and have kingpin weights of 3,500 lbs. After all the personal belongings are added, they are very much worthy of 1 ton dually tow vehicles.

Another issue is going up to Alaska. The roads are extremely rough, and the terrain is extreme in some places. Also distances are great. That route is no place to take a 3/4 ton overloaded truck. The 3/4 and 1 ton trucks use the same running gear, but the suspension and extra pair of tires means alot.

Get yourself a dually truck for the odyssey.
Old 05-04-2021, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
Some trucks are "artificially" down rated on purpose to avoid triggering CDL requirements in certain situations. See similar on a lot of trailers. For instance I have a trailer that's tagged as being a GVWR of 9,990, which is identical in every way to one stamped at 14K from the same manufacturer other than the tag stamp. If you look at the "build my own" or whatever they call it on the GM site there is a 10K GVWR option for the SRW 2500's & 3500's.
I gotcha. The only 10K GVWR trucks I have seen were extended cab gas so this option must not be that common around here.

edit: Actually if I filter by the 10K GVWR option I do see many, I'll be damned

Last edited by Jonboater; 05-04-2021 at 09:48 AM.

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