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-   -   Trailer Tire Pressure (https://www.thehulltruth.com/trucks-trailers/1153583-trailer-tire-pressure.html)

Danyelfell 04-04-2021 02:51 PM

Trailer Tire Pressure
 
What are you guys running in your trailer tires? Tires say max 80 pounds. Seems a little high but I donít know. Tandem axle trailer boat is 8500-9000 pounds.

Kr_1315 04-04-2021 04:38 PM

Max pressure when cold, always.

macksboat 04-04-2021 06:36 PM

I know it is not normal, because cars run a very specific tire psi, but all trailer tire and trailer manufactures want max psi at cold. And yes it will wear out the center of the tire faster, but it much safer.

jadatis 04-05-2021 03:36 AM

For trailers that carry different loads, max pressure of tire is wise, to cover highest load.
But for trailers that always carry the same load, like boats, the total weight can be determined once, and it counts for years.

Then you can calculate a highest pressure for that weight, at wich no bumping, and maximum reserve.

This then will probably be lower then maximum of tire.

Patton222 04-05-2021 04:21 AM

May go against the grain but around town I run less pressure as it seems to be a lot easier on the trailer and boat. On trips or any extended highway driving I’ll gas them up to 5 less than max. That being said I’m running a 7k trailer with a 4-4500k boat so I have some working room others may not.

broncoaz 04-05-2021 05:57 AM


Originally Posted by Patton222 (Post 14617431)
May go against the grain but around town I run less pressure as it seems to be a lot easier on the trailer and boat. On trips or any extended highway driving Iíll gas them up to 5 less than max. That being said Iím running a 7k trailer with a 4-4500k boat so I have some working room others may not.

Donít forget the weight of the trailer itself, probably 1200-1500#. That 7000# rating is the boat and trailer.

Butch Davis 04-05-2021 06:59 AM

Two choices, IMO.

One, run max sidewall cold pressure at all times.

Two, go to the truck stop and weigh your boat and trailer fully loaded with a full fuel tank adding 200 pounds per person then add 10% for a safety factor. Check the tire manufacturers specs for the proper pressure for the load to be carried.

I believe choice one to be the low risk choice especially if you live where pavement temperatures are high and you tow at highway speeds. That's the choice I've been using for 38 years and I have never had a trailer tire failure or flat. Plus it's the easier choice.

leonreno 04-05-2021 07:35 AM


Originally Posted by Butch Davis (Post 14617817)
Two choices, IMO.

One, run max sidewall cold pressure at all times.

Two, go to the truck stop and weigh your boat and trailer fully loaded with a full fuel tank adding 200 pounds per person then add 10% for a safety factor. Check the tire manufacturers specs for the proper pressure for the load to be carried.

I believe choice one to be the low risk choice especially if you live where pavement temperatures are high and you tow at highway speeds. That's the choice I've been using for 38 years and I have never had a trailer tire failure or flat. Plus it's the easier choice.

why are you adding 200 lbs per person on a boat trailer? Just curious

SmokyMtnGrady 04-05-2021 07:14 PM

here is another way to look at it. I use to think running it on the low side. If the tire was rated say for 45lb , load range C back in the day ,I would think hey 35 or 40 is good enough. I would have trailer issues because of either my lack of maintenance on the brakes or because I didn't understand the importance of proper tire inflation. Low pressure increases rolling resistance thus increasing heat build up. Heat is the enemy of bearings and tires.

Since running tires at max cold and switching to load range D Endurance tires I have not been stranded. I will take the extra wear over changing flats along I-95 any day.

duke460 04-05-2021 07:54 PM

Have quite a few long distance trips with no tire failures. Max pressure when cold, always.

cajflynn 04-05-2021 08:14 PM

There is no debate on this subject. Max pressure.

Apexwarrior 04-06-2021 05:24 AM

Not sure max at all times is entirely correct.

My welded steel triple axle Phoenix trailer (12k with boat) came with e rated tires (max 80 lbs) and a sticker on the trailer that says inflate to 65 lbs.

I know others (CajFlynn) are pros. I am not, but I thought I would point this out. My view has been to go with what the manufacturer states as proper for their equipment. The only possible explanation I can think of is the manufacturer put the wrong sticker on the trailer when it was built. However, I doubt that..

Butch Davis 04-06-2021 06:01 AM

LEONRENO - I would add 200 pounds per person based on average weight of Americans (which seems to increase daily) plus any personal gear they often carry such as a tackle bag and a couple of rods/reels and or a small lunch cooler with ice. My weight is about 180 and my tackle bag has to weigh over 20 pounds.

Butch Davis 04-06-2021 06:03 AM

Apexwarrior = There is no way the trailer maker can know the weight of the load on the trailer in all situations. If you don't like the max refer to earlier posts on weighing the boat/trailer fully loaded.

vonshep 04-06-2021 02:35 PM

my trailer has a sticker like a car that gives the psi for weight ranges i go by that

thataway 04-06-2021 07:59 PM

Most tire manufactures have an inflation chart such as this one for Good Year Endurance, which I am currently running:

inflation amount per weight on tire:

broncoaz 04-06-2021 09:41 PM


Originally Posted by Butch Davis (Post 14620507)
LEONRENO - I would add 200 pounds per person based on average weight of Americans (which seems to increase daily) plus any personal gear they often carry such as a tackle bag and a couple of rods/reels and or a small lunch cooler with ice. My weight is about 180 and my tackle bag has to weigh over 20 pounds.

The trailer maker does know the GVWR for the trailer and can base their tire pressure recommendations on it. My trailer is rated for 2993#, the tires are rated for 1760# max load at 50 psi. Looking at the Goodyear chart, a similar size tire is capable of holding 1500# at 38-39 psi. If I inflate to 50 psi I’m giving the boat a rougher ride than necessary because the tires will be so hard it will bounce on any/all bumps instead of the tires taking some of the initial shock. On my first trip with the trailer I guessed and put the tires at 35 psi, it was fine on the 3 hour trip home.

For over 12 years I ran my 14K car hauler trailer tires at 65 psi lightly loaded rather than 80 psi as the sidewall max said. Even in the AZ heat I never had tire issues related to inflation. The only tire problems I had were from dry rot and one broken belt from a particularly nasty pothole.

Do what you feel safe with.



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Mahalo 04-07-2021 04:07 AM

I have always go one up on tire rating, trailer originally came wit D I use E but use less pressure. D was rated 65 e 80 I put 70 all around on tri-axle trailer with GVW around 12K

Apexwarrior 04-07-2021 04:37 AM


Originally Posted by Butch Davis (Post 14620521)
Apexwarrior = There is no way the trailer maker can know the weight of the load on the trailer in all situations. If you don't like the max refer to earlier posts on weighing the boat/trailer fully loaded.

Thanks Butch - but to be clear, the manufacturer knows exactly the load, as they manufactured the trailer and sold it to Formula for my exact application.

I agree that in the absence of other information, max is best, but that is not always the case.

Butch Davis 04-07-2021 06:26 AM

Not to get too deep into the grass, but neither Formula nor the trailer manufacturer knows how much the weight of your Formula will be when you are using it. They can make some assumptions such as the fuel and water tanks will be filled to capacity and the load weight carried will be the maximum USCG rated for the boat., and finally that the boat will not be loaded beyond the USCG capacity. If that is the weight they assume will be on the trailer then I agree with your assumption.

I was unaware that trailers are sometimes built for a specific make/model of boat by mass market builders. Usually a trailer is built to a weight carrying range and perhaps fitted to a specific hull design for placement of bunks, rollers, fenders, bow stops, etc. Thanks for pointing that out.


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