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Trailer Tire Pressure

Old 04-07-2021, 06:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Butch Davis View Post
LEONRENO - I would add 200 pounds per person based on average weight of Americans (which seems to increase daily) plus any personal gear they often carry such as a tackle bag and a couple of rods/reels and or a small lunch cooler with ice. My weight is about 180 and my tackle bag has to weigh over 20 pounds.

I think the point being that not too many people put people in the boat for the trailer ride to the ramp. People weight is not riding on trailer tires.
Old 04-07-2021, 07:09 AM
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It must very from builder to builder.

I have had two custom weld (only my boat model/hull will fit) trailers for my current boat and both stickers said max psi.
Old 04-07-2021, 08:17 AM
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The nature of poorly constructed trailer tires makes it impossible to compare their usage parameters to car tires.

Learn about reserve capacity if you care to understand the difference.

Max pressure is the answer for me.
Old 04-07-2021, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by cajflynn View Post
The nature of poorly constructed trailer tires makes it impossible to compare their usage parameters to car tires.

Learn about reserve capacity if you care to understand the difference.

Max pressure is the answer for me.
Add me to max inflation for trailer tires. I run Michelin XPS RIB 16's at 80 psi. My boat fully loaded on the custom Ameritrail "C" channel trailer weighs just over 11k pounds.With the torsion axles it's not bouncing around nor does it ride rough. In fact it is very smooth and tires wear very evenly.
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Old 04-07-2021, 08:23 PM
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I think the table posted by broncoaz is the definitive answer. Other answers saying 'fully inflated" are NOT good advice. There is a reason/experience behind the bad advice though. Many people buy trailer tires with jjust enough capacity to carry their load. That's an invitation for trouble. Look at your motor vehicle; you'll find they are rated significantly more than they usually carry. Get tires with some reserve capacity and inflate them properly, will serve you better than blindly inflating to max pressure no matter what.
Old 04-07-2021, 09:06 PM
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Originally Posted by NLOL View Post
I think the table posted by broncoaz is the definitive answer. Other answers saying 'fully inflated" are NOT good advice. There is a reason/experience behind the bad advice though. Many people buy trailer tires with jjust enough capacity to carry their load. That's an invitation for trouble. Look at your motor vehicle; you'll find they are rated significantly more than they usually carry. Get tires with some reserve capacity and inflate them properly, will serve you better than blindly inflating to max pressure no matter what.
You think cheap Chinese trailer tires are equal to a new set of Michelin light truck tires provided they are sized equally? That's laughable.

For the record, my "bad advice" comes from years of experience.
Old 04-08-2021, 03:31 AM
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Originally Posted by NLOL View Post
I think the table posted by broncoaz is the definitive answer. Other answers saying 'fully inflated" are NOT good advice. There is a reason/experience behind the bad advice though. Many people buy trailer tires with jjust enough capacity to carry their load. That's an invitation for trouble. Look at your motor vehicle; you'll find they are rated significantly more than they usually carry. Get tires with some reserve capacity and inflate them properly, will serve you better than blindly inflating to max pressure no matter what.
Please provide the negatives to Max psi that is on the sidewall? The Pros far outweighs the Cons to run at max. The tires will last longer and wear much more evenly it's much less stress on the tread when doing tight turns. I agree with a weight chart on a passenger vehicle where the wheel base is further apart. If you try to run today's crap China bombs at lower pressures you will be changing tires on the side of the road more often. Most all boat trailers (as well as RV's) are running tires close to their capacity. My trailer has 2 7k axles. What tires do you recommend? I too have many years experience with towing trailers/RV's. Be careful what advise you give out as well as practice with the crap tires on the market today....IMHO
Old 04-08-2021, 04:12 AM
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Originally Posted by NLOL View Post
I think the table posted by broncoaz is the definitive answer. Other answers saying 'fully inflated" are NOT good advice. There is a reason/experience behind the bad advice though. Many people buy trailer tires with jjust enough capacity to carry their load. That's an invitation for trouble. Look at your motor vehicle; you'll find they are rated significantly more than they usually carry. Get tires with some reserve capacity and inflate them properly, will serve you better than blindly inflating to max pressure no matter what.
While well intentioned, poor advice such as this should be deleted. This type of advice is germane towards cars where ride quality is part of the equation. And the car often has a high quality tire (Goodyear, Michelin, etc)

On trailer tires, always run the max rated pressure.
Old 04-08-2021, 05:15 AM
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Some bad advice in the responses. Yes, you can use the max psi on the tire, but you don't have to based on your load, and the only way to know your load is to weigh the trailer/boat. Think about it, with ST tires, there's no other reason for a mfgr. to publish a load chart unless you can use the recommended psi for the load.

If you don't want to get weighed and simply use max psi, go for it. If your load doesn't require it, the trailer may ride rougher and the tires wear out faster. BTW, tires are the biggest topic on RV forums, where many of us are pulling 16-18,000 bricks down the road, and blowouts can be catastrophic.
Old 04-08-2021, 05:37 AM
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Originally Posted by cajflynn View Post
For the record, my "bad advice" comes from years of experience.
All I needed to read is that you suggested max psi. Thatís what Iíve been running. And Iím fairly certain that you tow more pounds more miles each week than most do in a year.
Old 04-08-2021, 06:13 AM
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Broncoaz is correct that many tires will have a manufacturer's load and inflation chart. You can inflate a tire to carry a certain load if you know the weight of the vehicle or trailer.

Here is the document with load and inflation tables for Michelin truck and RV tires as an example: https://www.michelintruck.com/assets...k_Sept2011.pdf I use this as a guide for the XPS rib tires on my trailer.

If you do not know that weight then maximum inflation would be a logical choice. But it is not the only choice if you know the weight the tires are carrying.

Just because someone has done something over and over does not make it the only, or even the correct, choice!
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Old 04-08-2021, 06:35 AM
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Originally Posted by capt_matt View Post
Broncoaz is correct that many tires will have a manufacturer's load and inflation chart. You can inflate a tire to carry a certain load if you know the weight of the vehicle or trailer.

Here is the document with load and inflation tables for Michelin truck and RV tires as an example: https://www.michelintruck.com/assets...k_Sept2011.pdf I use this as a guide for the XPS rib tires on my trailer.

If you do not know that weight then maximum inflation would be a logical choice. But it is not the only choice if you know the weight the tires are carrying.

Just because someone has done something over and over does not make it the only, or even the correct, choice!
Just curious, how much does the boat fully loaded on your trailer that you run the XPS RIB tires on weigh? And how many axles?
Old 04-08-2021, 06:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Vantaredoc View Post
Just curious, how much does the boat fully loaded on your trailer that you run the XPS RIB tires on weigh? And how many axles?
Estimated gross weight is 7500-8000 pounds on a twin axle Rolls Axle trailer rated at 10400 pounds gross. I run the tires at 70 psi but I could run them at 60 psi and be just fine. At max inflation of 80 psi the tires will support the full 10400 pounds gross weight.
Old 04-08-2021, 06:50 AM
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Whatever the maximum pressure the sidewall indicates, don't overthink this.
Old 04-08-2021, 07:11 AM
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Yup, my brain was turned off when I said to allow for pax weight.
Old 04-08-2021, 08:05 AM
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Originally Posted by capt_matt View Post
Estimated gross weight is 7500-8000 pounds on a twin axle Rolls Axle trailer rated at 10400 pounds gross. I run the tires at 70 psi but I could run them at 60 psi and be just fine. At max inflation of 80 psi the tires will support the full 10400 pounds gross weight.
Do you realize the vast majority of folks trailering boats are doing so with trailers that are at their max weight and many that are overloaded when boat is full loaded with gear? How many people that ask about tire pressure do you think will weigh the boat/trailer at a certified scales? Even you said "Estimated". I have a certified CAT Scale slip for my trailer with the boat on it fully loaded at #11258.xx. I don't always haul full loaded. Walk beside your trailer while someone is turning hard on concrete and listen to the tires and look at how much rubber stays on the concrete. With max psi, it's less stress on the tire as it slides sideways on the concrete.

It's always safer to advise the average person asking on the interweb about tire pressure to use max. You do realize that not everybody opts for the expensive tire and their favorite tire from yesteryear is made in a different country than they used to be and generally suck...right? Same goes for RV's! My RV body shop stays very busy from folks using the internet and old habits for tire advice....
Old 04-08-2021, 08:07 AM
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Originally Posted by capt_matt View Post
Just because someone has done something over and over does not make it the only, or even the correct, choice!
Vanteradoc owns a very large RV dealership. Heís not wondering how trailer tires work. Heís telling you. Sometimes, Cappy, itís better to listen.

Last edited by cajflynn; 04-08-2021 at 08:14 AM.
Old 04-08-2021, 08:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Belzelbub View Post
All I needed to read is that you suggested max psi. Thatís what Iíve been running. And Iím fairly certain that you tow more pounds more miles each week than most do in a year.
There is a fair bit of knowledge gained driving heavy boats through California and Arizona in August. Youíll notice no one has mentioned that outside air temperature should be a factor in inflation choices. Tire construction and intended uses are also left out.

Heat is the enemy of trailer tires.

The number one cause of trailer tire issues is under inflation. An under inflated tire runs hot. When it gets too hot, it blows. Simple as that.



Old 04-08-2021, 08:53 AM
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There are 2 potential, very minor downsides to running max pressure unnecessarily.

1) Early wear in the center of the tire
2) Slightly rougher ride

Neither are significant compared to tire failure due to under inflation. Damage to fenders, trailer sheet metal (enclosed utility/car trailers), etc. is much more expensive than replacing tires a bit earlier. The one that's particularly of laughable concern (for most people) is the early center wear impact. In reality, other than commercial haulers few people run enough miles to ever wear out trailer tires before they age out or get sidewall dry rot...so who cares?

The advantage is clear...less likelihood of tire failure. Best case tire failure is a major inconvenience on the side of the road. Worst case its an accident or major trailer repairs.
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Old 04-08-2021, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
There are 2 potential, very minor downsides to running max pressure unnecessarily.

1) Early wear in the center of the tire
2) Slightly rougher ride

Neither are significant compared to tire failure due to under inflation. Damage to fenders, trailer sheet metal (enclosed utility/car trailers), etc. is much more expensive than replacing tires a bit earlier. The one that's particularly of laughable concern (for most people) is the early center wear impact. In reality, other than commercial haulers few people run enough miles to ever wear out trailer tires before they age out or get sidewall dry rot...so who cares?

The advantage is clear...less likelihood of tire failure. Best case tire failure is a major inconvenience on the side of the road. Worst case its an accident or major trailer repairs.
I have started the fourth and final season on these 2017 date code tires. They are wearing perfectly with a slight feather from sliding sideways on tight turns. These are Michelin XPS RIB 16Ē tires that I set to 80psi before every trip. My distance to the ramp I use the most is 35 miles one way, I have towed to Miami a couple times as well as Clearwater, St Augustine, FT Myers Beach and many other places across Florida during the hottest part of the season. I wonít say how fast I tow but most traffic does not pass us on the interstate!








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