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To Jack up or not jack up trailer over winter

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To Jack up or not jack up trailer over winter

Old 11-25-2020, 09:59 AM
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Default To Jack up or not jack up trailer over winter

I have a tandem trailer and 23í WA, total weight is 5400 lbs. Over the winter they are stored on a grassy area. The first year I had the boat, since the ground was not yet frozen, I didnít want the tires to sink into the soft ground or develop flat spots. I jacked up the trailer and rested it on vertical sections of logs on both sides of the frame where the Xís are in the photo. Last year I didnít jack it up, mostly because I just didnít get to it before it snowed (southern NH).
I'm getting ready to jack it up this year but have a concern about the way I did it the first time. I have a hydraulic floor jack. I jacked the front up under the tongue so I could put the front logs under the trailer at the same time. I put a level across the front of the trailer so I could make sure it sat level side to side Then I jacked one side of the back, placed the log and then jacked up the other side. I only jack it up enough so the tires clear the ground and get as close to level side to side and front to back as I can. The logs sit on large cement paving blocks.
The ground it sits on is not level. When I jack up and level the front and when I jack up the back sides one at a time Iím concerned that I could be putting torsion forces on the trailer that could permanently warp it. Is that a possibility? Would it be better to put the jack between the tires and jack up an entire side at once?



Last edited by Gpag; 11-25-2020 at 10:04 AM.
Old 11-25-2020, 10:00 AM
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Do you have plywood underneath?
Old 11-25-2020, 11:06 AM
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While jacking up will save the tires from being in one spot all winter I'd be concerned about the force on the frame from jacking. I'd probably take some plywood bevel the front and rear edges of it and park the trailer up on the plywood. You could try emailing tech support for the trailer manufacturer. I have found that if a trailer sits in the same spot for a long time you will find cracks starting on the part of the tire that was on the ground, this happened when my boat was laid for a couple of years for major repairs. Trailer tires developed cracks right where they touched the ground but they were 5+ years old by then.
Old 11-25-2020, 02:28 PM
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Have you considered a set of low-profile cinder blocks? They are pretty inexpensive. From the tires' perspective, there isn't much difference between this, and sitting in indoor storage.

Place one in front of each tire, and pull the trailer up onto them? The image is from PopUpPortal.com


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Old 11-25-2020, 02:55 PM
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^^^^^ Will develop a flat spot.
Old 11-25-2020, 03:00 PM
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I guess logs under a trailer donít develop a flat spot??? Am I missing something? You could put a large paver under all four wheels and the tongue stand and have ONE more flat spot than four logs give you. Maybe Iím crazy.
Old 11-25-2020, 03:04 PM
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I have never jacked up a trailer. Just get the wheels on a plank or plywood. Biggest damage comes from sunlight, cover the tires.
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Old 11-25-2020, 03:33 PM
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Originally Posted by phillipgo View Post
^^^^^ Will develop a flat spot.
I keep my trailers on concrete all year round....Wisconsin winters last about 6 mos. it's never been an issue.

Flat spots happen -- but work themselves out when you drive a few miles. Does anyone have problems with flat spots?
Old 11-25-2020, 03:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Captain_0bvious View Post
I keep my trailers on concrete all year round....Wisconsin winters last about 6 mos. it's never been an issue.

Flat spots happen -- but work themselves out when you drive a few miles. Does anyone have problems with flat spots?

lmfao, damn, I thought he meant flat spots in the yard! Iím an idiot for sure!
Old 11-25-2020, 05:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Captain_0bvious View Post
Have you considered a set of low-profile cinder blocks? They are pretty inexpensive. From the tires' perspective, there isn't much difference between this, and sitting in indoor storage.

Place one in front of each tire, and pull the trailer up onto them? The image is from PopUpPortal.com
Thatís what I put under the logs. Iíll just put them under the tires this time.
Thanks. Less work is always good.
Old 11-28-2020, 10:36 AM
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I just run mine up on untreated pieces of 3/4” plywood. The flat spots that develop will round out after a few miles of towing in the spring, even faster if the weather is warm for the first drive.
Old 11-28-2020, 01:06 PM
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If I were in the north, I might would consider putting the trailer/boat up on jack stands and remove the tires to store indoors somewhere. Put the stands under the axles. Is that a viable option?
Old 11-28-2020, 01:25 PM
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Park the tires on wood of some sort, been working for me for decades.
Old 11-28-2020, 02:38 PM
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set on jack stands and pull the tires and place inside a building protected from sun and weather,
and turn the hubs from time to time to spread the grease around the bearings and races.
those lug threads need attention every year anyway
Old 11-28-2020, 10:03 PM
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About 4 years ago I bought a boat in NC it had all new tires drove it to CT. Used the boat for the year stored next to my home. Trailered the boat locally and about 50 miles each way in early June.

Then in the middle of July I went 125 miles about 80 into it flat tire then at 100 flat #2. As soon as it got hot the flat spotted tires went to hell.

I immediately changed them all and I have been jacking up my trailer every winter and removing them since.

Old 11-29-2020, 12:18 PM
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Keep the tires properly inflated ...roll the trailer a few feet forward then back to new spot every mo or so if youíre concerned of flat spot
Old 11-30-2020, 10:14 AM
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Tires properly inflated and I park on plywood/ runners. My spot is mostly level so I level the trailer to ensure equal pressure on all 4 wheels.
Seems to work for me.

When I had a sports car- my tires were square the first 5 minutes then everything was good in the spring.
Old 11-30-2020, 11:02 AM
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OP, your jacking spots are fine as long as you distribute the weight over a 10 or 12" section of the frame. I use a scrap piece of 4x4 about 12" long on top of my floor jack pad and lift as close to the rear axle as possible. Then use a single block of steel box tubing (I'm on a concrete floor) that's approx. 1/4" or so thick in between the wheels. A short piece of 2x6 on top to distribute the weight over a larger area. This keeps my tires a few inches off the ground and allows me to remove them over the winter to service the brakes, etc. When jacking, you should use a jack stand under the tongue to avoid overloading your tongue jack.


Old 11-30-2020, 11:06 AM
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I jack mine up - spin the tires when I walk through the yard - keep the hubs rolling!
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Old 12-01-2020, 02:47 PM
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park trailer, put stands under axles so springs support weight and tires are off ground. cover tires to protect from sunlight, Have a beer and wait for spring.

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