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No more V-8 Toyota Tundra beginning 2022

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No more V-8 Toyota Tundra beginning 2022

Old 10-14-2020, 10:29 AM
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Default No more V-8 Toyota Tundra beginning 2022

Wow just seen this today, Could be old news for some of you https://www.autoevolution.com/news/2...ed-150040.html

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10-14-2020, 12:51 PM
JExpedition07
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The V8 is still king when it comes to work. That is why Ford and GM just spent millions on their V8 engine programs and created new pushrod V8 engines. Big mistake on Toyota’s part if they want to remain king in reliability. The V8 gets better MPG under load, runs cooler, etc. Just a better work horse than a boosted V6. For most F-150s the EcoBoost is a no brainer and a good choice, but for those who will seriously be working these trucks in oil fields and plowing, the V8 is the only way to go.
Old 10-14-2020, 12:01 PM
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The tundra’s V8 was pretty archaic amongst the other V8’s on the market. It is especially archaic compared to modern turbo V6’s.

It’s just a sign of the times. These turbo V6’s pack a wallop in regards to torque and efficiency. However, I would prefer a simpler drive train hence why I bought a hemi recently with no e-torque options. V8’s are a dying breed.
Old 10-14-2020, 12:03 PM
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Hopefully they make a non-hybrid high HP turbo option. I'll give up mileage to avoid the complexity of hybrid, but very much desire turbo charging.
Old 10-14-2020, 12:09 PM
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Are they going to release it in a 5/8 ton version?
Old 10-14-2020, 12:16 PM
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I get it as an option but to do away with it completly seems odd. Watching the issues my borther has had with his 2.7eb and a good friend with his 3.5eb I am not a fan. Nothing big just little nickle and dime stuff all the time. Ill be getting a new truck next year and looking at the 3/4 tons and the tundra. This might push me towards the 3/4 tons.
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Old 10-14-2020, 12:51 PM
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The V8 is still king when it comes to work. That is why Ford and GM just spent millions on their V8 engine programs and created new pushrod V8 engines. Big mistake on Toyota’s part if they want to remain king in reliability. The V8 gets better MPG under load, runs cooler, etc. Just a better work horse than a boosted V6. For most F-150s the EcoBoost is a no brainer and a good choice, but for those who will seriously be working these trucks in oil fields and plowing, the V8 is the only way to go.
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Old 10-14-2020, 03:12 PM
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Not to derail but his got me thinking, what makes a pushrod engine better/stronger than a vvt/vvd ohc v8?
with today’s engine technology, the old pushrod v8 is pretty ancient
Seems someone like Toyota could engineer and incredibly strong but fairly efficient engine utilizing modern engine tech
Old 10-14-2020, 03:32 PM
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Less stuff moving on a push rod mota
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Old 10-14-2020, 03:39 PM
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They're a lot simpler, if you ever have to do any mechanical repairs it makes a big difference. Like comparing the old school inboard GM V8s and V6s to a modern 4 stroke outboard. Doing a valve job on the former is very easy, on the latter fiendishly complicated and the parts cost a fortune.
Old 10-14-2020, 04:05 PM
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My 4.7 is thirsty but a wonderful engine
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Old 10-14-2020, 04:08 PM
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Originally Posted by LouC View Post
They're a lot simpler, if you ever have to do any mechanical repairs it makes a big difference. Like comparing the old school inboard GM V8s and V6s to a modern 4 stroke outboard. Doing a valve job on the former is very easy, on the latter fiendishly complicated and the parts cost a fortune.
This....with a notable exception being the bastardized modern motors that drop cylinders for economy. Kills a lot of the inherent simplicity for a very meager emissions gain.
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Old 10-14-2020, 04:25 PM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
This....with a notable exception being the bastardized modern motors that drop cylinders for economy. Kills a lot of the inherent simplicity for a very meager emissions gain.
It's done for fuel economy, not emissions. It actually has no emissions gain, rather if not done perfectly a slight negative.

Unless you are talking CO2 emissions, which nobody but California uses it as something to test for... and when they do all they are doing is creating a new fuel economy standard.
Old 10-14-2020, 04:33 PM
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Originally Posted by ericinmich View Post
It's done for fuel economy, not emissions. It actually has no emissions gain, rather if not done perfectly a slight negative.

Unless you are talking CO2 emissions, which nobody but California uses it as something to test for... and when they do all they are doing is creating a new fuel economy standard.
which is nuts. Had a 1999 Chevy 2500 (first year of the 6.0) that seriously got better mileage than my Ram 1500 with MDS, which ate a motor at 213k due to mds. 2500 was 4x2, but otherwise comparably equipped/specked. That truck is still around town, and well over 500k at this point.
Old 10-14-2020, 06:20 PM
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The 5.7 v8 is definitely gone in the Tundra after 2021. The Land Cruiser will no longer be sold in the USA after 2021, and the 5.7 v8 will no longer be in the Lexus version (LX 570). Twin turbo v6 with hybrid option will be the replacement. This is all to meet mileage requirements.

A Tundra with the 4.7 v8 went a million miles. I wonder how reliable these more complicated motors will be...although the Prius has been very reliable long term so maybe it will be fine.
Old 10-14-2020, 06:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Erobinson1 View Post
Not to derail but his got me thinking, what makes a pushrod engine better/stronger than a vvt/vvd ohc v8?
with today’s engine technology, the old pushrod v8 is pretty ancient
Seems someone like Toyota could engineer and incredibly strong but fairly efficient engine utilizing modern engine tech
Ford and GM’s new pushrod V8 engines both utilize VVT, it’s a torque actuated phaser on the in-block cam. Biggest reasons are low end torque and reliability, Fords new 7.3 Liter gasser has a torque curve flat as a pancake with 400 lb ft coming online by 1,500 RPM. This is starkly different from DOHC engines and their relatively peaky power curves. The way the air convects and rushes in at low revs on the 2-valves with large intake ports makes it great for stump pulling. That and a pushrod engine has one in-block camshaft which allows smaller heads and a simpler timing chain setup. This makes the pushrod engine more compact and versatile to shoehorn into separate or developing platforms. In fact the 7.3 is smaller than the 5.0 in overall width—true story. They also are generally cast iron which is great holding up to extreme heat cycles.

Last edited by JExpedition07; 10-14-2020 at 07:11 PM.
Old 10-14-2020, 08:34 PM
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People love to give the 5.7 iforce a hard time due to its age but it’s a great engine. Puts down good power(very similar to the Ford 6.2 everyone praises). Fuel mileage leaves a little to be desired but it’s not as bad as everyone makes it out to be in my experience. I had a 08 tundra, an 11 F150 3.5 Eco, a 14 f150 5.0 and now a 2020 tundra And the difference in MPG is not that different between them. My fords were usually 15-16mpg mixed driving hand calc and the Toyota’s 14.5-15.

No arguing that the eco boost is a fun engine, as stated they can be finicky. I suppose it’s the future for all of us, I’m sure Toyota will put out a more reliable product than ford. I guess we’ll see.
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Old 10-14-2020, 08:42 PM
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Been a die hard GM buyer for 30 yrs. With that being said, 2021 could just be the year I trade in the Silverado and scoop up one of the last 5.7 Tundras.
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Old 10-14-2020, 09:36 PM
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Originally Posted by JExpedition07 View Post
Ford and GM’s new pushrod V8 engines both utilize VVT, it’s a torque actuated phaser on the in-block cam. Biggest reasons are low end torque and reliability, Fords new 7.3 Liter gasser has a torque curve flat as a pancake with 400 lb ft coming online by 1,500 RPM. This is starkly different from DOHC engines and their relatively peaky power curves. The way the air convects and rushes in at low revs on the 2-valves with large intake ports makes it great for stump pulling. That and a pushrod engine has one in-block camshaft which allows smaller heads and a simpler timing chain setup. This makes the pushrod engine more compact and versatile to shoehorn into separate or developing platforms. In fact the 7.3 is smaller than the 5.0 in overall width—true story. They also are generally cast iron which is great holding up to extreme heat cycles.
This is an excellent explanation and exactly what I was looking for. Thanks
Old 10-15-2020, 04:32 AM
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Originally Posted by c_m_25 View Post
The tundra’s V8 was pretty archaic amongst the other V8’s on the market. It is especially archaic compared to modern turbo V6’s.

It’s just a sign of the times. These turbo V6’s pack a wallop in regards to torque and efficiency. However, I would prefer a simpler drive train hence why I bought a hemi recently with no e-torque options. V8’s are a dying breed.
Archaic- but reliable as all get out, and simple.

I love boosted engines. I've rented a few F-150's and Expeditions with the eco boost - towed my boat and small camper from SC to MD with one. Yes, more power at low end and slightly better fuel mileage... I owned a turbo car for 160k, and that is where the issues started. Sensors, exhaust diverter valve issues, boost creep and the slow loss of boost pressure. The failing valve required a complete removal of the turbo/piping and cost $1500 to replace. The only job of the valve - to pre heat the turbo so it would worm up quicker an last longer.

For my truck - I want a NA pushrod engine that is actually de tuned for durability. Simplicity - less sensors and gizmos to fail. I plan to use the truck for 250k+ while towing 10k for much of that time. My opinion - a small displacement turbo engine just wont hold up to that duty.

Compare the 6.4 Hemi to a theoretical boosted engine for a HD truck. The hemi is de tuned to about 70% of its designed HP output for truck service, where a small displacement boosted engine will be tuned up to squeeze the max out of the block - with the added complexity of the turbo system...

Ford isn't putting the eco, or a larger version of it, in the HD trucks for a reason. Chevy and Ram use larger displacement naturally aspirated pushrod V8's in HD applications for a reason. Simplicity and reliability.

I don't think the V8 is dead for working truck applications... I think they are being improved to fill in the void of the dying diesel market.
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Old 10-15-2020, 04:33 AM
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My 2018 Tundra Platinum 5.7 has 14k miles on it.....I think I will be fine for a while.

The 5.7 and six speed archaic power set up pulls my 7800 lb rig nicely. The Tundra doesn't lack the weight of the aluminum trucks, so you feel stable and secure towing.

It could average 12 mpg and I wouldn't care. The fact it gets me 18 mpg avg is all that I could ask for.

The reliability of these trucks is noteworthy. I would imagine when they introduce a V6 with turbos and electric assist it will be as reliable as the 5.7 has proved to be.
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