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Super Lube vs Vortex hubs. Whats the difference?

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Super Lube vs Vortex hubs. Whats the difference?

Old 06-04-2020, 04:25 PM
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Joe
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Default Super Lube vs Vortex hubs. Whats the difference?

Aside from the screw on grease cap, what's the difference between these two hub styles? I see on some Vortex hubs there is a zerk on the back side of the hub; others have it in the axle stem.

I have one piece integral Vortex hub / rotors, so my grease fittings are behind the screw on cap on the axle stem. As typical, the two year old TDE brakes are starting to stick, so I'm going to have to replace all the hubs so i can use the "hat" style (separate) rotor. Are getting Vortex hubs worth their premium price? I'm thinking of just buying SS hubs. Tell me why I shouldn't.

(please no suggestions for oil bath hubs. I've seen too many issues with those)
Old 06-06-2020, 09:39 AM
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Anybody?
Old 06-06-2020, 10:45 AM
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Vortex hubs are far superior. They should be no maintenance for 5 years. Everything is engineered to spec to fit together perfectly.

The other setup you are referring to are the EZ Lube axles. They are pretty easy to grease. Just hook your gun up to the zerk, push new grease in, that grease is filled in from the back of the hub which forces old grease out the front. I have these on my trailer and they can be problematic. The cap on the hub has a little rubber “button” on the end that gives you quick access to the grease zerk. These will dry out quickly and crack. This allows easy entry of water to the outside bearing. If not caught in time, this water will make its way to the inner bearing. Before long, you will be on the side of the road changing a hub. That’s worst case scenario obviously. You just have to stay on top of these.
Old 06-06-2020, 01:31 PM
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They differ in the path used to pump in fresh grease. Both allow re-greasing of bearings without removing hub. Both allow old grease to be pushed out of front of hub.

Vortex hubs - grease zerk on rear of hub, grease goes in between rear seal and rear bearing.

EZ Lube axles - grease zerk on outboard end of axle, grease goes down axle and exits between rear seal and rear bearing.

No other substantial differences other than marketing.
Old 06-07-2020, 05:42 AM
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Originally Posted by c_m_25 View Post
Vortex hubs are far superior. They should be no maintenance for 5 years. Everything is engineered to spec to fit together perfectly.

The other setup you are referring to are the EZ Lube axles. They are pretty easy to grease. Just hook your gun up to the zerk, push new grease in, that grease is filled in from the back of the hub which forces old grease out the front. I have these on my trailer and they can be problematic. The cap on the hub has a little rubber “button” on the end that gives you quick access to the grease zerk. These will dry out quickly and crack. This allows easy entry of water to the outside bearing. If not caught in time, this water will make its way to the inner bearing. Before long, you will be on the side of the road changing a hub. That’s worst case scenario obviously. You just have to stay on top of these.
You are correct, water will get past the rubber plug. I’ve had success installing a Bearing Bra over the top of the rubber plug. This rubber cup seals off the end of the dust cover.
Old 06-07-2020, 05:44 PM
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Want to stop the water getting past the plug? There is a remedy if you're intrested
Old 06-07-2020, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Thalasso View Post
Want to stop the water getting past the plug? There is a remedy if you're intrested
The bearing buddy bra thing works pretty well. What is your suggestion?
Old 06-07-2020, 08:55 PM
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Originally Posted by capt_matt View Post
They differ in the path used to pump in fresh grease. Both allow re-greasing of bearings without removing hub. Both allow old grease to be pushed out of front of hub.

Vortex hubs - grease zerk on rear of hub, grease goes in between rear seal and rear bearing.
https://youtu.be/9LdO-ZFCzdU

EZ Lube axles - grease zerk on outboard end of axle, grease goes down axle and exits between rear seal and rear bearing. https://youtu.be/XT0RKDGgDm8

No other substantial differences other than marketing.
My vortex hubs have the zerk on the end of the axle shaft, behind a plastic screw on cap, as I explained above.
Old 06-08-2020, 06:26 AM
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The rear mounted zerk fittings are so hubs that can be greased from the rear can be added to axles that aren’t drilled from the factory. A bit less convenient to grease, but not by much.
Old 06-08-2020, 06:34 AM
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Originally Posted by c_m_25 View Post
The bearing buddy bra thing works pretty well. What is your suggestion?
That would be it along with let the bearings cool before dunking
Old 06-08-2020, 07:46 AM
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^^We don't need longer wait times at the ramp
Old 06-08-2020, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Thalasso View Post
That would be it along with let the bearings cool before dunking
I cool my hubs down by dunking them in the water when I back my boat down.
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Old 06-08-2020, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Thalasso View Post
That would be it along with let the bearings cool before dunking
If your hubs need to cool down, the bearings are way too tight. Temp on mine never go past 90°.

You launching into 40° water?
Old 06-08-2020, 04:20 PM
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Originally Posted by quetip View Post
If your hubs need to cool down, the bearings are way too tight. Temp on mine never go past 90°.

You launching into 40° water?
You know this how?

It works like this.
When you back a boat trailer into the water with hot hubs, the cool water quenching the heat actually causes a vacuum to form inside the hubs, effectively vacuuming water into them
Old 06-08-2020, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Thalasso View Post
You know this how?

It works like this.
When you back a boat trailer into the water with hot hubs, the cool water quenching the heat actually causes a vacuum to form inside the hubs, effectively vacuuming water into them
Never argue with a moron. They’ll drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.
Old 06-08-2020, 06:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Thalasso View Post
You know this how?

It works like this.
When you back a boat trailer into the water with hot hubs, the cool water quenching the heat actually causes a vacuum to form inside the hubs, effectively vacuuming water into them
unless your hubs aren’t hot to start with. Not sure about yours....but my hubs are barely above ambient temp after most runs that end at a boat ramp. Sure, if you have been on the road in July heat for hours....let them cool. If it’s an issue with a short trip to the boat ramp that’s not sufficiently covered in the amount of time it takes to make the boat ready for launch, time for some axle work.
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Old 06-08-2020, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Thalasso View Post
You know this how?

It works like this.
When you back a boat trailer into the water with hot hubs, the cool water quenching the heat actually causes a vacuum to form inside the hubs, effectively vacuuming water into them
My hubs have about 5 to 8 psi pressure in them all the time. Not an issue. I have never had water in my hubs when I do my once a year greasing.
Old 06-09-2020, 06:16 AM
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Originally Posted by D_Westie View Post
My hubs have about 5 to 8 psi pressure in them all the time. Not an issue. I have never had water in my hubs when I do my once a year greasing.
Pressurized hubs shouldn't let water in. You're correct.

Old 06-09-2020, 06:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Misterfu02 View Post
Never argue with a moron. They’ll drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.


Are you saying this is incorrect Mr experiance
Old 06-09-2020, 09:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Thalasso View Post
You know this how?

It works like this.
When you back a boat trailer into the water with hot hubs, the cool water quenching the heat actually causes a vacuum to form inside the hubs, effectively vacuuming water into them
Used a handheld IR thermometer to check after a hub rebuild. I was surprised but pretty happy with the reading.
It was a 35 mi trip one way.

However, the whole assy does heat up to ambiant temp because when I checked temps before recovery, it was 107.

Last edited by quetip; 06-09-2020 at 09:56 AM.
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