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Does anyone know honda AWD system? I need to replace one axle of tires

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Does anyone know honda AWD system? I need to replace one axle of tires

Old 01-14-2020, 02:09 PM
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Default Does anyone know honda AWD system? I need to replace one axle of tires

I have a 2017 Honda Ridgeline. When I bought it 10,000 miles ago, the dealership put a new set of tires on the front. The rears are down to the wear bars and need replaced soon.

I know some AWD systems need all 4 tires to be within a certain size or it can cause damage. I'm not sure if the Honda system is like this. Now obviously I have mismatched tires on there now, but I plan to keep this long term, so I want to prevent causing any damage to the differential and what not.

Am I safe to just put a new set of tires on the back, with the front set being only 10,000 miles old?
Old 01-14-2020, 03:30 PM
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You are talking about 1/2" of tread depth difference, should not be a problem.
Old 01-14-2020, 04:46 PM
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They should have the same tire size on all four wheels ( circumference) is what you need to watch out for. This is for AWD

The Subarus need to be within a 1/4 inch in circumference to avoid damage
Old 01-14-2020, 04:57 PM
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I doubt it'll hurt anything. The awd system on your Ridgeline is nothing like what Subaru uses.
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Old 01-16-2020, 07:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Elgreco809 View Post
I doubt it'll hurt anything. The awd system on your Ridgeline is nothing like what Subaru uses.
Having owned both, I'd agree. The Outback [and almost all Subarus for that matter] have one of the best AWD systems I've ever encountered. I kept the tires evenly matched.
My Ridgeline was a great truck, and the VTM-4 system really helped pulling my boat up a slippery ramp, but it's more of a part-time system. I would feel fine with replacing just 2 tires.

Granted it was a gen1, but it pulled this up a slippery ramp without issue.

Old 01-16-2020, 08:18 AM
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You should be fine with that difference in tread depth. If you rotate your tires every OCI (around 7-9k miles), they should eventually wear pretty evenly.

The i-VTM4 on your 2017 runs the rear wheels at 3.7% greater speed than the front wheels, which is modulated through clutches.

You should check out RidgelineOwnersClub.com - you can get a LOT of valuable information there.

i picked up a 2019 RTL on New Year's Eve. Paid 31,800 for AWD, leather, moonroof, power rear slider, heated seats, etc., added heated steering wheel and lighted running boards included in that price, and got 72 months 0.9% financing.
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Old 01-16-2020, 08:46 AM
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Why are the rears worn in 10,000 miles?
Old 01-16-2020, 09:46 AM
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Originally Posted by jobowker View Post
Having owned both, I'd agree. The Outback [and almost all Subarus for that matter] have one of the best AWD systems I've ever encountered. I kept the tires evenly matched.
My Ridgeline was a great truck, and the VTM-4 system really helped pulling my boat up a slippery ramp, but it's more of a part-time system. I would feel fine with replacing just 2 tires.

Granted it was a gen1, but it pulled this up a slippery ramp without issue.

Not all Subarus are the same either. Subaru uses like 5 different systems depending on vehicle.
Old 01-16-2020, 09:52 AM
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Don't put Michelin Premier LTX's on it. Wear way too fast on that size vehicle.

Defender LTX's do well.
Old 01-16-2020, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by lugoismad View Post
I have a 2017 Honda Ridgeline. When I bought it 10,000 miles ago, the dealership put a new set of tires on the front. The rears are down to the wear bars and need replaced soon.

I know some AWD systems need all 4 tires to be within a certain size or it can cause damage. I'm not sure if the Honda system is like this. Now obviously I have mismatched tires on there now, but I plan to keep this long term, so I want to prevent causing any damage to the differential and what not.

Am I safe to just put a new set of tires on the back, with the front set being only 10,000 miles old?

Sounds like the previous owner did take care of it. How many miles were on it when you bought it? My factory tires lasted 60K miles on my RL
Old 01-16-2020, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Thalasso View Post
They should have the same tire size on all four wheels ( circumference) is what you need to watch out for. This is for AWD

The Subarus need to be within a 1/4 inch in circumference to avoid damage
Wow! If my math is correct, that means that the tires must be within 1.3 / 32" of each other.

Guess on this Subaru system, you replace all 4 tires at once. Heaven help you if you get an unrepairable flat.
Old 01-16-2020, 04:14 PM
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Originally Posted by FASTFJR View Post
Sounds like the previous owner did take care of it. How many miles were on it when you bought it? My factory tires lasted 60K miles on my RL
I bought it with 37 . Coming up on 50k now.

I'll be replacing the worn tires with the oem Firestone's.
Old 01-16-2020, 04:16 PM
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Originally Posted by BACKTOTHESEA View Post
Why are the rears worn in 10,000 miles?
They aren't. They are original and coming up on 50k miles. The fronts were replaced by the dealer when I bought it last year.
Old 01-16-2020, 04:26 PM
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You'll be okay with the same size tires all the way around--even if two are worn. I caution you about the wear bars, however. I have a Lexus IS, and it has very wide low profile tires (18"). One day it'll have tread left. Look down two days later, and not only the wear bars are showing but the metal is also showing thru that. And I've yet to see a low profile tire that lasts many miles.

I've since started purchasing only vehicles that have tall sidewall tires. No more ultra high performance rubber for me.
Old 01-16-2020, 09:41 PM
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I would suggest with any 4wd or AWD that you keep same brand and type.
As someone mentioned, circumference is the concern.
I’ve seen guys with two different brands (same sizing but big difference in circumference) pull in with their truck and in 4wd it hops around almost uncontrollably.
Old 01-17-2020, 05:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Tiretyme View Post
I would suggest with any 4wd or AWD that you keep same brand and type.
As someone mentioned, circumference is the concern.
I’ve seen guys with two different brands (same sizing but big difference in circumference) pull in with their truck and in 4wd it hops around almost uncontrollably.
I think that's a good suggestion.
Old 01-17-2020, 09:12 AM
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Originally Posted by longboat View Post
The i-VTM4 on your 2017 runs the rear wheels at 3.7% greater speed than the front wheels, which is modulated through clutches.
That makes no sense and isn't possible, think about it. How could it run the rear wheels at 3.7% faster than the front via clutches if all the tires are on the ground? VTM is Variable Torque Management, the system varies torque sent to the rear wheels via clutches in the rear diff. Wife had a 2012 Honda Pilot that we bought new and put 120k miles on. It worked well and got the job that it was meant to do done, but it was no Jeep. Even VTM Lock didn't lock the rear 100%, but it wasn't meant to be like a Jeep. It did great in the snow, at the boat ramp, and launching/retrieving at lake beaches.

To the OP, I wouldn't worry about a slight difference in tire size. The way the VTM4 system works there's no center diff, the driveshaft to the rear diff is always spinning based on the speed of the front wheels and the rear diff isn't a normal differential. The torque sent to the rear tires is 100% controlled by a clutch pack for each side, there are no spider gears that allow for the normal speed differential to occur when making turns, etc. Point being, those clutches are always slipping to some degree no matter what and that is why the rear diff fluid service interval is so frequent.
Old 01-17-2020, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by longboat View Post
You should be fine with that difference in tread depth. If you rotate your tires every OCI (around 7-9k miles),
What is OCI?
Old 01-17-2020, 02:03 PM
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Originally Posted by leonreno View Post
What is OCI?
OCI = Oil Change Interval
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Old 01-17-2020, 02:46 PM
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