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Wood bunks, to cover or not

Old 11-07-2019, 05:43 PM
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Default Wood bunks, to cover or not

Guys,

Iím getting ready to redo the bunk carpet on my trailer. The main bunks are made of cypress I believe and are currently completely covered in bunk carpet (all the way around). The top is worn and needs to be replaced. Is there any reason other than cosmetics, that the entire bunk should be covered? Iím leaning towards just covering the tops and extending down the sides about 5 or 6 inches so I wonít have to cut anything. Any part that the hull makes contact with will be carpeted. Thanks for any advice!
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Old 11-07-2019, 05:52 PM
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Bunk slicks for sure...
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Old 11-08-2019, 05:04 AM
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That will work fine
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Old 11-08-2019, 07:17 AM
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Once the original bunk carpet wore out, all the old stuff came off and after the short-lived indoor/outdoor(Home Depot) carpet wore out, and the used fire hose went on, both times I only covered the top 1/2 of the bunks using monel staples.

No need to wrap the entire bunk, at all.
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Old 11-08-2019, 07:26 AM
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The piece of carpet you use to cover your bunks is just cut carpet, not cut and bound carpet. Therefore with the entire bunk being covered in carpet it puts the cut edge on the underside (and out of sight) of the bunk. With you covering the top and the two sides that leaves your cut edge of the carpet exposed to the elements and subject to unraveling and looking like crap. And when that happens there is no way to fix it.

How much money are you actually going to save my not carpeting the underside of the bunks?
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Old 11-08-2019, 07:36 AM
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Another vote for slicks. I moved to adding 1/4" HDPE on the tops with countersunk screws. Night and day difference on launch and recovery.
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Old 11-08-2019, 07:36 AM
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Two lessons in life I have learnt and they both apply here:
1) The short way (shortcut) often times ends up being the long way. Or another way of putting it would be, "The easy way often times ends up being the hard way"
- More times then not cutting corners has caused me to redo the job and the time saved the first time around has now double would it would have taken me to do the job right in the first place. I now do things right the first time and every time and doing that it hasn't come back to bit me in the ass.
2) Cheap is expensive.
- The same rules apply here. Saving a buck is always great, but if I have to scrap the money I just spent to redo the job then I over spent what it would have cost me the first time around if I had done the job right in the first place.

I'm the type of person that does not like to compromise on the things I do, I like things to be right and not half assed, but that's me.
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Old 11-08-2019, 09:21 AM
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Thanks guys, thatís the whole point in asking. I knew someone would have already experienced the results of doing it each way. I didnít consider that the exposed edge would unravel. Thatís good info so thanks Garret. Iím also a do it right once type of person.

I considered going the firehouse route but the hose seems pretty rough. My boat has bottom paint so I was concerned it would take the paint off. I donít use the trailer often but the ramps I use require a little loading. Unfortunately I canít float on all the way. Thoughts on that for those who have done the hose? Thanks again.
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Old 11-08-2019, 12:21 PM
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I'd leave the bottom uncovered. That way the water can drain and doesn't get trapped on the bottom of the wood by the carpet.
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Old Yesterday, 11:53 AM
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Good info in here. I'm getting ready to recover my bunks soon. Thanks.
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Old Yesterday, 12:02 PM
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When I had bunks, I'd go about halfway down the side and fold the edge of the carpet under (like at the bottom of a pants leg) and use slightly longer fasteners. No unraveling and it's functional rather than cost-saving bc it lets the wood dry out after use.
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Old Yesterday, 06:46 PM
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Great minds think alike. This is exactly what I did. Turned out great. Thanks for all the replies!
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