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Trailering Advice

Old 08-12-2019, 11:20 AM
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Hoping to get some advice from guys who are trailering larger boats. I have a 28 Regulator which weighs around 10,500 lbs loaded. The times I've met my local boat center to haul it for service, they're using a generic trailer and it's kind of a bitch to get out of the water. I assume a bunch of this is because the trailer isn't set up for the boat. For example, they usually start by not backing in far enough. Trying to use throttles to get the boat up the trailer bunks then leads to the realization by the service guy that he needs to back in further. Then the next attempt the boat will get to the winch post roller but will slide back down if I kill the motors. So with two guys, it's feasible to keep the engines pushing the boat onto the trailer while the other guy attaches the winch strap and tightens it down.

However, the problem arises when I want to do this alone. I used to trailer a 23' boat by myself and didn't have an issue. Clearly keeping the engines in gear against the winch stop while I get off the boat and hook it up alone is a stupid plan fraught with potential disaster.

Do you guys think a properly setup trailer would make one man loading feasible for a boat this size? I've seen plenty of videos where boats are gently powered onto a trailer and then stay put once the engines are shut down. If I'm stuck using two people to load the boat, then it's kind of a no go as my wife will never be able to handle the chore.
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Old 08-12-2019, 11:33 AM
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Staying on the trailer is mainly a function of the size of the boat, combined with the angle of the ramp. A longer boat will tend to float in the rear. Guide post properly positioned will allow you to get to the bow stop, or very close, and keep it centered. You may still need to winch it up slightly, but it shouldn't be anything considerable.
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Old 08-12-2019, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
Staying on the trailer is mainly a function of the size of the boat, combined with the angle of the ramp. A longer boat will tend to float in the rear. Guide post properly positioned will allow you to get to the bow stop, or very close, and keep it centered. You may still need to winch it up slightly, but it shouldn't be anything considerable.
This ramp was steep and relatively short which may have added to the difficulty.
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Old 08-12-2019, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by spearfish25 View Post


This ramp was steep and relatively short which may have added to the difficulty.
For sure. That's basically a worst case scenario for a long boat. Doable, but not without challenges.
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Old 08-12-2019, 02:06 PM
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Even with a short steep ramp, a properly matched trailer will help. Even with the stern floating.
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Old 08-12-2019, 05:49 PM
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Can you hook up the winch to the bow eye by reaching over the bow? maybe rig something up to hold the winch strap out for you?

I have watched a lot of fishing guides on the river use the engines to hold a boat in place (either retrieving on a trailer beaching on a bank), then walk to the front to hook up the boat before killing the motor. Necessary due to the river current. Granted, those are 20' river boats not a 28' CC, big difference in size and power. You could make an extension for the dead man to allow you to reach the bow, but be able to kill the engines if something went bad. I agree with not getting OFF the boat with the motors applying thrust.

Would you be using the same ramp you referenced if going out by yourself fishing? Sounds like the short steep ramp is primarily for the maintenance yard. A more established ramp may be easier as well.
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Old 08-12-2019, 05:56 PM
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Its a popular ramp but I think mostly for smaller boats. I did hear a nearby ramp is much more bigger boat friendly. The bow eye is a long way down and about 6” out of reach. I’m thinking that a good dose of experience with a well set up trailer along with proper guides can make it work. I’d also get a ladder mounted by the winch post so I can climb down easily and use it as a visual reference when loading.
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Old 08-14-2019, 05:06 AM
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I assume it is a bunk trailer? Carpeted bunks or slippery HPDE (starboard) ?
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Old 08-14-2019, 05:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Onewolf View Post
I assume it is a bunk trailer? Carpeted bunks or slippery HPDE (starboard) ?
The service trailer was carpeted. I haven’t bought a trailer yet so could do either. I’ve seen options for carpet, HMWR, and fire hose.
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Old 08-15-2019, 09:22 PM
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It can be done!

The trick for you, I think, will be to learn where your trailer's sweet-spot is -- and back your trailer up to that point where your boat wants to self-center. Then pull the trailer out of the water a few feet.

Power the boat onto the trailer. You will need to use a bit of extra throttle to slide your boat up onto the bunks, but the extra friction will hold the boat in place when you climb down to set your winch.

If it's a deep ramp, you'll need a set of training wheels. Here is the style we use:

We have carpeted bunks -- and they work great. Our boat -- like yours is 10,500 lbs.
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Old 08-15-2019, 10:55 PM
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I converted my trailer from rollers to bunk and that was like me shooting myself in the leg, not the foot but the leg. Easily I eliminated more then half the boat ramps that were otherwise available to me. Oh I can use them but they fight me the whole time...so I try to stick to the ones I know work for me.

Maybe this is your problem, you are just using the wrong ramp for your boat/ trailer setup? And the only way you are really going to know is to try a handful of other ramps while making note of the water levels.
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Old 08-16-2019, 03:34 AM
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Thanks guys. I think you’re right that it’s going to be very ramp, tide, etc dependent and the key is the situational awareness and prior experience to compensate. Sounds like some learning curve ahead.
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Old 08-16-2019, 04:10 AM
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I have been loading big boats on the trailer solo and now with my young grandson for years. I have a ladder on the front of the trailer and use engines to hold against stop, climb down and hook strap and crank tight. Walk back shut motors off, trim up, climb down ladder and pull out.
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Old 08-16-2019, 06:26 AM
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Originally Posted by spearfish25 View Post
Hoping to get some advice from guys who are trailering larger boats. I have a 28 Regulator which weighs around 10,500 lbs loaded. The times I've met my local boat center to haul it for service, they're using a generic trailer and it's kind of a bitch to get out of the water. I assume a bunch of this is because the trailer isn't set up for the boat. For example, they usually start by not backing in far enough. Trying to use throttles to get the boat up the trailer bunks then leads to the realization by the service guy that he needs to back in further. Then the next attempt the boat will get to the winch post roller but will slide back down if I kill the motors. So with two guys, it's feasible to keep the engines pushing the boat onto the trailer while the other guy attaches the winch strap and tightens it down.

However, the problem arises when I want to do this alone. I used to trailer a 23' boat by myself and didn't have an issue. Clearly keeping the engines in gear against the winch stop while I get off the boat and hook it up alone is a stupid plan fraught with potential disaster.

Do you guys think a properly setup trailer would make one man loading feasible for a boat this size? I've seen plenty of videos where boats are gently powered onto a trailer and then stay put once the engines are shut down. If I'm stuck using two people to load the boat, then it's kind of a no go as my wife will never be able to handle the chore.

My 34' cruiser weighs about 17,000lbs loaded and I single handedly load/ retrieve it every single time. My wife entertains the dogs, since they just get in the way if we are both doing it. I can launch/ retrieve this big beast faster than 99% of the typical launch ramp crowds launching a 20' boat.

Having a good trailer is certainly part of it, but experience and practicing is key. On a boat your size, an electric wireless winch would be ideal. Get it on the trailer enough to get it hooked up, then power up while using the winch remote to winch it up. I also HIGHLY suggest a bow ladder. This makes solo launch/ retrievals a lot easier.

Here is a video, please ignore my 85lb German Shepard. He thought I was going for a boat ride without him. This is why my wife has to normally walk away with the dogs lol.


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Old 08-16-2019, 08:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Garett View Post
I converted my trailer from rollers to bunk and that was like me shooting myself in the leg, not the foot but the leg. Easily I eliminated more then half the boat ramps that were otherwise available to me. Oh I can use them but they fight me the whole time...so I try to stick to the ones I know work for me.

Maybe this is your problem, you are just using the wrong ramp for your boat/ trailer setup? And the only way you are really going to know is to try a handful of other ramps while making note of the water levels.
Everybody has different results based on their setup and how experienced they are. But I will say this: the only thing that keeps us from using (any) boat ramp, are the trees that overhang the road on the way in - our boat is 13.5' on the trailer. Our trailer has bunks, and they have never caused us problems landing/launching.

In fact, if I had to launch/land solo -- I think bunks would be preferable. Once the boat is perched on the bunks, it's less likely to roll off, and make you swim after it.

BTW: I love the idea of a ladder. If I were ordering a trailer from the factory, that would be the way I'd go.
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Old 08-16-2019, 08:55 PM
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I glide or power up , take a rope thats on a forward cleat , toss it over the winch stand and cleat it on the other side , front or rear cleat , which ever is easier , kill engine . Attach winch to bow eye standing on " dry land "
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Old 08-17-2019, 12:34 AM
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Originally Posted by normsworld View Post
I glide or power up , take a rope thats on a forward cleat , toss it over the winch stand and cleat it on the other side , front or rear cleat , which ever is easier , kill engine . Attach winch to bow eye standing on " dry land "
What type of boat/trailer do you run? Any pics? --I am curious to see how something like (what you described) would work....
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Old 08-17-2019, 04:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Vantaredoc View Post
I have been loading big boats on the trailer solo and now with my young grandson for years. I have a ladder on the front of the trailer and use engines to hold against stop, climb down and hook strap and crank tight. Walk back shut motors off, trim up, climb down ladder and pull out.
Same system when I am solo. Get the bow on the roller, leave motors in gear, climb down, winch tight & attach safety chain, climb up, stop motors and trim them up, climb back down and get in the truck. Takes 2-3 minutes?

I don't have a ladder though. Still young enough to get by without one.
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Old 08-17-2019, 04:35 AM
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What do you guys think of carpet vs starboard (uhmwr), or firehose? Myco offers then all. Seems like there are obvious friction differences but also concerns about hull wear and tear.
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Old 08-17-2019, 05:39 AM
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Originally Posted by PremierPOWER View Post
My 34' cruiser weighs about 17,000lbs loaded and I single handedly load/ retrieve it every single time. My wife entertains the dogs, since they just get in the way if we are both doing it. I can launch/ retrieve this big beast faster than 99% of the typical launch ramp crowds launching a 20' boat.

Having a good trailer is certainly part of it, but experience and practicing is key. On a boat your size, an electric wireless winch would be ideal. Get it on the trailer enough to get it hooked up, then power up while using the winch remote to winch it up. I also HIGHLY suggest a bow ladder. This makes solo launch/ retrievals a lot easier.

Here is a video, please ignore my 85lb German Shepard. He thought I was going for a boat ride without him. This is why my wife has to normally walk away with the dogs lol. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asydg3PAZiA


Holy Moly I can't imagine trailering that monster. When you see these boats out of the water you realize just how big they are. I watched your video anxious to see either launching or retrieving. Maybe I missed something but all I say was backing down a launch ramp with a dog barking.
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