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White specks in tuna?

Old 03-24-2019, 07:48 AM
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Default White specks in tuna?


Caught a couple Black fin yesterday. One of them had white specks all through meat. I bled and iced them like always. Haven't seen this before and wondered what it is
Old 03-24-2019, 08:21 AM
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Worms?
Old 03-24-2019, 09:44 AM
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Probably fine to eat if you cook it but I'd probably still pass.
Old 03-24-2019, 10:06 AM
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Kudoa thunni
Old 03-24-2019, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Cjfla View Post
Kudoa thunni
^^Nailed it!^^
Old 03-24-2019, 10:57 AM
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I came across that same thing last summer I a big eye. We took a pass on it.
Old 03-24-2019, 11:36 AM
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Thank you I didn't keep that one.
Old 03-24-2019, 11:59 AM
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Maybe this is that special "Sesame Seed Blackfin" which comes pre-seasoned
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Old 03-24-2019, 07:19 PM
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Have cleaned 100+ blackfins in past month or two, and have not seen anything like that in any of them. I'd pass.
Old 03-24-2019, 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Cjfla View Post
Kudoa thunni
Thank you. Had to Google that. Said it was found in BFT in St Kitts. I'm only 150 miles from there.
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Old 03-24-2019, 08:39 PM
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I see that frequently in Bonitas and some blackfin in the USVi
Old 03-24-2019, 08:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Rapchizzle View Post
I see that frequently in Bonitas and some blackfin in the USVi

That's where I am. Do you still eat them? I didn't. Wasn't sure and had plenty
Old 03-25-2019, 07:14 AM
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Last summer we caught about a doz yellowfin in the channel and close to half of them looked like that, we also took a pass. I've never had seen that in a blackfin or YF. To see it in half of the fish we caught from one school makes me want to do a core sample on the fish before I put them in the box. Hope this isnt going to become common place.
Old 03-25-2019, 07:26 AM
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I had this in a baby Blackfin once. Disgusting to say the least. Don't think it is the same as the specks.
Old 03-26-2019, 07:21 AM
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Have been seening 1 or 2 of theses spots in a couple of BFT I have caught in the gulf the past two years. but nothing like the above picture. Have also been careful to inspect meat during final cuts. I have cut them out and ate the fish. I still feel fine......................................
Old 03-26-2019, 08:38 AM
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According to Google it is a parasite but I have not been able to determine if it is dangerous to humans or animals and if it is killed during cooking I would pass on any fish that looked like that until I know more , I hope that it does not spread into other species as well.
Old 03-26-2019, 08:47 AM
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Mahi bait
Old 03-26-2019, 09:12 AM
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Figured I'd also chime in on the anecdotal history of kudoa in Blackfin Tuna. There haven't been lots of discussions and this thread could help leave at least some trace of the history of this parasite which seems to be a more recent development in this species. It's also important to have this kind of data for future google searching fisherman wondering "What are these spots in the Black Fin Tuna I caught?"

We caught a Blackfin about 70 miles offshore of Hilton Head, SC around 2015 (I think) that had the same white-spotted flesh appearance. We also decided right away not to eat it, having never before seen this type of thing at least in this species. We often see worms that are a similar color in the flesh of Amberjack that are caught here, especially larger ones. However, unlike the AJ worms, the spots in the black fin tuna were more globular or spherical in shape, while the AJ worms are tubular and a traditional "worm" shape. We prefer to eat black fin as sashimi or only lightly cooked, so in this case it was an easy decision to toss it out.

There is a research paper easily searched regarding the appearance of Kudoa thunni in blackfin tuna (Thunnus atlanticus) which refers to a specimen harvested off St. Kitts in or around 2012 (the paper was published in 2014).

I've only heard in passing perhaps one or two other local reports of the same or similar parasite in blackfin here so it seems to be a rarity, which is good. The best information I can find indicates that it is not harmful to humans, and only becomes an issue for the fish *after* it has died. There are reports that Kudoa sp. cause liquification of the dead fish flesh within days or hours of death. It seems likely that this process of "myoliquefaction" occurs with the release of proteolytic enzymes by the parasite, making the flesh more digestible, and perhaps a part of the life cycle process of the parasite which is still not fully understood.

Despite indications that it is harmless to humans, I tend to be wary about parasites whose life cycle is not "fully understood" and who may or may not have intermediate hosts that we aren't yet identified, at least as it relates to me deciding to eat a raw or undercooked fish.

DISCLAIMER: Eating raw or undercooked fish can be harmful. Do so at your own risk and not based on recommendations from me or anyone else on the internet for that matter. Just because a fish "looks" ok doesn't mean it isn't harmful.

On the other hand, I chowed down on some fresh wahoo straight off the fish yesterday that we'd caught the prior day, and I'm still alive. I felt the risk was worth the reward. But if this is the last post of mine ever to appear on THT, maybe it was the fault of that sweet, sweet wahoo.

I also have some nice fresh amberjack cuts I just added to the fridge and I can say with 100% certainty that there are a few worms in them. That's just extra protein. We toss out portions of fish or sometimes whole fish if they are extremely wormy. In general, the more common worms in AJs are not harmful to humans and a freeze/cook process keeps you pretty safe against anything that might be a concern otherwise.

Anyone that's watched me filet and prep fish for cooking knows I'm very picky about the process. I think you're probably more inclined to be sickened by contamination via preparation surfaces, like that nasty cutting table on the dock for example, or your "lucky" old filet knife that might just give you an infection just looking at it, than you are to get something from the flesh of a properly prepared and cooked fish. And then there are things like ciguatera that you can't see, taste, or smell and are unaffected by freezing or cooking.

"When in doubt, throw it out." -- quote from a wise old fisherman who died from ciguatera poisoning
Old 03-26-2019, 09:45 AM
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Larry Backman whose a member here caught a ~100lb bigeye tuna in the northeast canyons this past summer that was loaded with those cysts. Unfortunately it became lobster food.
Old 05-01-2020, 12:14 PM
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Caught an 18+ pound BFT today off Jupiter and he was loaded with them. I'm used to seeing one or two of the Cysts in a fish on occasion, but not like this, which is what brought me here. Not eating it. Nope. No thank you.

Last edited by GKeats; 05-01-2020 at 12:22 PM.

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