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Oxygen system for bait

Old 03-05-2019, 10:51 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by wamc0206 View Post
SO in other words, whether its a keep alive system or some other O2 system, your saying O2 works? Keep Alive and some others have just brought it to a smaller scale and giving boaters a more economical way of using O2.
Yes, all these references I listed really do believe that oxygen gas definitely insures continuous safe oxygenation during live transports.
I clicked my Googler a few times more and found many different kinds and brands of these bait oxygen systems, more than I ever imagine. Different oxygen life support systems have their own pro’s and con’s, attributes, faults and engineering failures that are consistently predictable and should be expected.
I Googled: “compare bait oxygen systems for fishermen” and see the difference for yourself.
Next I Googled: “compare bait aerator and water pump systems” and compared them.
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Old 03-05-2019, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by 20biminitwist View Post
NO,

He ain't talking about the average live well. He is getting all crazy about the benefits if they are presented properly from such systems and not in any way being realistic to the average bait well in a boat.

The use of the word to transport tells all. That are for fish that have been captured and moved from their natural environment and stressed.

I haul bait all over hell alive while on the water. They need much more than O to survive from some gimmick
I’m not sure, but I have always heard and read that warm/hot water, like summer’s “hell, the livewell water retains very little dissolved oxygen resulting in high seasonal live bait and tournament fish mortality.

No disrespect but, what does an “average baitwell” mean to you. What does “above average” or “below average” livewell mean? I am not familiar with any of these terms.

o we all have a real clear understand of what a “livewell” is and is expected to do – Google: “Livewell,wiki” and see what “livewell” really means.

Any time any “livewell” fails to keep all the live bait or fish alive and healthy and they get sick andnd die, the haul box is certainly not a “livewell.” If the box or the fisherman cannot or fails to maintain minimal safe water inside a “livewell” and the bait or fish die, it’s a real torture chamber for dying captive fish, a “death well.”
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Old 03-05-2019, 04:54 PM
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Originally Posted by JJohnson37 View Post
I’m not sure, but I have always heard and read that warm/hot water, like summer’s “hell, the livewell water retains very little dissolved oxygen resulting in high seasonal live bait and tournament fish mortality.

No disrespect but, what does an “average baitwell” mean to you. What does “above average” or “below average” livewell mean? I am not familiar with any of these terms.

o we all have a real clear understand of what a “livewell” is and is expected to do – Google: “Livewell,wiki” and see what “livewell” really means.

Any time any “livewell” fails to keep all the live bait or fish alive and healthy and they get sick andnd die, the haul box is certainly not a “livewell.” If the box or the fisherman cannot or fails to maintain minimal safe water inside a “livewell” and the bait or fish die, it’s a real torture chamber for dying captive fish, a “death well.”
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Simple

You provide the same amount of water flow from the same water you caught your bait in to start with.
Raw incoming water with the same o as that bait lives in.

Don't confuse a tank of recirculating water against a bait well designed to provide ample amounts of raw water from the source that the bait you have caught to start with.

A live well is not a closed circuit tank like an aquarium. Done properly, it is supplying the bait with the same water they swim in every day.
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Old 03-05-2019, 04:58 PM
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Here's a thought, O2 system might let you keep bait alive while running through red tide waters if you close your intake ball valve before hitting contaminated water... More and more of a tangible issue over the last year or two.
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Old 03-05-2019, 04:59 PM
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Originally Posted by 20biminitwist View Post
Simple

You provide the same amount of water flow from the same water you caught your bait in to start with.
Raw incoming water with the same o as that bait lives in.

Don't confuse a tank of recirculating water against a bait well designed to provide ample amounts of raw water from the source that the bait you have caught to start with.

A live well is not a closed circuit tank like an aquarium. Done properly, it is supplying the bait with the same water they swim in every day.
O2 works for some instances. I know lots of guys that catch bait, put it in their livewells and pull the boat to go to another area. They do it using O2 to keep the bait alive during the move. Also, if you want to give the bait a charge before using it, it will most definitely frisk them up.

But as to keeping them longer or it being some secret way of keeping more bait alive in a livewell, well all that is false. I've tested that theory all last year and your bait is still prone to it's same morbidity rate without it as well as if you over fill the well.
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Old 03-05-2019, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by wamc0206 View Post
O2 works for some instances. I know lots of guys that catch bait, put it in their livewells and pull the boat to go to another area. They do it using O2 to keep the bait alive during the move. Also, if you want to give the bait a charge before using it, it will most definitely frisk them up.

But as to keeping them longer or it being some secret way of keeping more bait alive in a livewell, well all that is false. I've tested that theory all last year and your bait is still prone to it's same morbidity rate without it as well as if you over fill the well.
For 40 years of dealing with these little suckers at 88 degree water on the flats.
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Old 03-05-2019, 05:12 PM
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Originally Posted by 20biminitwist View Post
For 40 years of dealing with these little suckers at 88 degree water on the flats.
i agree with you. Day to day fishing doesn’t make a difference on it. I’m regarding transportation for tournament anglers. And as mentioned above getting bait through not so ideal conditions. But that goes back to above for transportation.

I ran a system all last year and while the bait was frisky coming from the O2 well it didn’t live longer nor was I able to put more bait in the well Bc of the O2.
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Old 03-05-2019, 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by wamc0206 View Post


i agree with you. Day to day fishing doesn’t make a difference on it. I’m regarding transportation for tournament anglers. And as mentioned above getting bait through not so ideal conditions. But that goes back to above for transportation.

I ran a system all last year and while the bait was frisky coming from the O2 well it didn’t live longer nor was I able to put more bait in the well Bc of the O2.
The pic is the well on my 21 MA.
A 1100 GPH plus an 800 running in a 40 gallon well with low velocity and multiple inlets and drains. Pilchards require it.

I run both pumps when I first put them in out of the cast net to clear the shit out of their pants just after being caught.
Once they get their affairs in order I run on the single 1100 pump.
I won't lose a tournament if my bait dies, I just won't get paid.
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Old 03-05-2019, 05:28 PM
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They say those livewell bait chemicals make a big difference in bait survival. What kind of bait saver chemicals do you guys use and how much chemical?
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Old 03-05-2019, 05:41 PM
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Originally Posted by 20biminitwist View Post
Once they get their affairs in order I run on the single 1100 pump.
.
Wow! That's a total livewell water exchange 27.5 times every hour. In 7 hours you have changed the total water volume 192.5 times.

Why do you flush so.... much water through your livewell?
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Old 03-05-2019, 06:27 PM
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Originally Posted by JJohnson37 View Post
Wow! That's a total livewell water exchange 27.5 times every hour. In 7 hours you have changed the total water volume 192.5 times.

Why do you flush so.... much water through your livewell?
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Because it keeps them alive! Just like in the vast amount of water they live in when in their natural environment.

That is why my well is a live well. Many baits excrete ammonia and other waste especially when stressed.
lack of 0 as well as swimming in their own shit will kill them.
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Old 03-06-2019, 06:23 AM
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Originally Posted by 20biminitwist View Post
Because it keeps them alive!
I can see why you definitely don’t won’t or need to waste your time and money for a livewell oxygen rig when yours works great for you.

Do you ever fish with or transport hand size live menhaden in your 40 gallon livewell, how many menhaden this size?

I found menhaden to be very delicate/fragil, like anchovy. Neither seem to live well very long in any livewell even with high volume livewell pumps like you use.
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Old 03-06-2019, 07:32 AM
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Many baits are fragile and have to be handled differently.

Lack of O is not the only thing that will kill baits. Foamy or agitated water, sloshing and banging around in the well in rough seas, blasting the bait with high velocity inlets or spray heads.

The most fragile baits I carry are threadfins. They need to be caught with a sabiki to make them last as a cast net is too hard on them. Same for ballyhoo.

I don't fish with menhaden so don't know the specifics on them. A pressurized well with high volume and multiple low velocity inlets to circulate the entire water column is the ideal set up. No dead spots. Also not a fan of the windows or clear lids on wells either. The baits see movement and never settle down and it speeds up the process of wearing their ass out.

I watch the pilchards when I open the lid of my well and they go from chilling out to panic mode the minute they see me moving around. Try to catch that last dozen out of a big well and tell me they ain't trying to run from any movement. Heck, it takes 5 minutes to catch the last one sometimes.
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Old 03-06-2019, 07:35 AM
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Since some have mentioned a chiller for a live well system, I'm curious what that would involve.

We often find ourselves catching pilchards in canals or basins with little water flow during the summer months. While it's the water they're living in, it can be very hot and we tend to lose some before we get out to open, cleaner and cooler, water. Increasing flow with the washdown hose helps but I think if we could chill the water a few degrees from the high 80 to say high 70s the pilchards would be happier and last longer.
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Old 03-06-2019, 07:39 AM
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[QUOTE=20biminitwist;12177744]Good exchange rates across the entire water column is the key to keeping bait alive.
[/QUOTE]

This is the answer, maybe toss in a frozen 16oz water bottle on summer days, the end.

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Old 03-06-2019, 08:18 AM
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This is the answer, maybe toss in a frozen 16oz water bottle on summer days, the end.[/QUOTE]

It will end up beating them up and there is no economical way to cool the live well. And your not gonna cool much introducing raw water at 1100 GPH.

If it's really hot you just have to learn not to crowd the well as much as in cooler times. Those pilchards that get back in the canals are usually on the bottom. Canal surface waters in some areas get real hot and that is what water your well is picking up.
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Old 03-06-2019, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by 20biminitwist View Post
Many baits are fragile and have to be handled differently.

Lack of O is not the only thing that will kill baits. Foamy or agitated water, sloshing and banging around in the well in rough seas, blasting the bait with high velocity inlets or spray heads.

The most fragile baits I carry are threadfins. They need to be caught with a sabiki to make them last as a cast net is too hard on them. Same for ballyhoo.

I don't fish with menhaden so don't know the specifics on them. A pressurized well with high volume and multiple low velocity inlets to circulate the entire water column is the ideal set up. No dead spots. Also not a fan of the windows or clear lids on wells either. The baits see movement and never settle down and it speeds up the process of wearing their ass out.

I watch the pilchards when I open the lid of my well and they go from chilling out to panic mode the minute they see me moving around. Try to catch that last dozen out of a big well and tell me they ain't trying to run from any movement. Heck, it takes 5 minutes to catch the last one sometimes.
What's your definition of a low velocity inlet? Would directional flow matter?
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Old 03-07-2019, 05:08 AM
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Go back to post 10 and watch the video. That is my well with the exception of I have another pump and 2 more inlets to achieve what I explained earlier for getting a rapid exchange when actively catching bait. Once they get settled down then I pump exactly as in the video. No dead spots. I also drilled a 3/8's hole at the bottom of the stand pipe to help get solids off the bottom.

I believe a very well known guide in the Keys "Mark Krowka" was a part of this well design for Maverick!
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Old 03-08-2019, 04:36 AM
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[QUOTE=20biminitwist;12307558]Many baits are fragile and have to be handled differently.

Lack of O is not the only thing that will kill baits. Foamy or agitated water, sloshing and banging around in the well in rough seas, blasting the bait with high velocity inlets or spray heads.QUOTE]That dirty, nasty livewell foam in livewells is definitely a problem. The problem of foam in the livewell is a whole different matter alone worthy of a new thread alone. Let’s talk “foam in the livewell” with a new thread.J
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Old 03-08-2019, 04:28 PM
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I looked into cooling the water of the bait tank I keep on the dock and had some people help me with the BTU math. If you don’t exchange the water it would work but if it constantly gets fresh water it would take hundreds of pounds of ice per day.
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