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Old 10-11-2018, 06:04 AM
  #21  
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The postings by the captain are a selling point for him, showing how great he did.
I doubt very much that he came in despite the clients wanting to continue fishing.



Originally Posted by cwhite6 View Post
I follow a bunch of charter Captains on Facebook and Instagram. I like seeing the catches and their pictures. On some of them (inshore only), they post pictures with taglines like “Done by 9am and back to the dock” or “Caught them early and back by 830am” or something similar. They will show a picture of a redfish limit or two or a limit of trout. Now, to be clear, these are charters in south Louisiana and are NOT half day charters. These charters average $600 to $800 depending on the amount of people. In the comments, folks sometimes ask why didn’t you fish for something else or play catch or release and the Captains respond to the tune of they are not wasting their time doing that. I can see if someone requested to go in early, but that does not seem to be the case.



To me, I would be pissed if I paid $700 for an inshore charter and we fished for 3 hours. If we limit out on reds, we better be chasing trout, sheepshead, flounder, catfish or something. I have been on two inshore charters and a few offshore ones. On both inshore ones, we did not come in until 3pm or so. The Captains worked their tails off finding stuff for us to catch. On one, nothing was biting at all and my FIL really wanted to fight some fish. So we went to the jetties and he battled huge black drum for a couple hours and had a blast.



Is this practice of quitting that early normal for inshore charters?
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Old 10-11-2018, 09:58 AM
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Had the same issue as the OP. Always wanted to try Venice inshore. Saw the implied way the charter goes - catch a limit and back to the dock and decided against it.
I enjoy the fishing but not so much the eating. Didn't want to interfere with the charter culture and feel like I wasn't doing what I was paying for.
Been going to Islamorada for a while now. Enjoy the fishing there.
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Old 10-11-2018, 11:28 AM
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Three of us fished with a guide for two days out of Port Sulfur back in July. On the second day, we had our limit of BIG trout by 8;45 in the morning. That is 75 BIG trout. We were spent. We were driving back to Georgia that same day, and the captain had to clean all those fish, so we were ready to head to the hill. We caught our 75 fish on day one also, but it took until lunchtime to do it.
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Old 10-11-2018, 02:55 PM
  #24  
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Fished Venice inshore 2 days w a charter. Capt Keith Kennedy I believe.
1st day was tough..found some trout and reds...but slow
Second day we hit a spot and stayed there for hours.
We caught 62 redfish. The Capt had a clicker counting them!.Wife and I had a blast. In fact we had to stop catching bc it was time to go in.
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Old 10-12-2018, 04:33 PM
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We had clients ready to come back early during our whooping 6 day Red Snapper season once we caught our limit. We always run our full trip unless the client is ready to end it early. We have posted about having our limit of a species by whatever o’clock but we move onto other species.
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Old 10-13-2018, 04:24 PM
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Different country and different species but it isn't unusual for our clients to ask to head in once they have their limit of the main target species. Sometimes an 8hr charter can get as short as 5 hours, and 6 to 7 hours is quite normal in peak season. They will all have at least 7 of one species and usually several of a by-catch species so often almost more fish than they want to take home anyway. Catch & release is not good for the fish in the depths we tend to fish (barotrauma) so once you are limited out you stop fishing.

There are limited options for targeting other species unless it is a small group and you can fish deep live-baits, or we can chase some less desirable food fish that will C&R ok. Mostly people quickly get tired of that though. Only extra activity that leaves is to stop in a nice bay somewhere for a BBQ etc. There can be days when you leave the dock at 7am, have your limit of fish, have a BBQ, and still be back in 6 hours. On the other hand, if we are having a slow day occasionally, and it is OK with the clients, an 8 hour trip might become 10 or 11 hours. Often it is the clients bragging about how early they got back to the dock with their limits.

The above is what I would call 'accepted practice' in this fishery. Never heard a client complain about being home a bit early with a limit bag. Sometimes though we have clients looking specifically to fill their bins so we will target some more common surface fish that are OK, but not prime eating. Then we go after the prime species. On the other hand, when we have non-local clients we might plan the whole trip a little differently with more focus on the experience and variety than on filling catch limits. That's the discussion before they even book the trip.

I guess every fishery is different, but I do understand the charters advertising their success rates
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Old 10-15-2018, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by N2theblue View Post
I don't know where you get a 50% mortality rate but it is not even close for fish that are released in good condition. If you don't like fishing, don't fish. Its that simple.

If you want to keep believing that the vast majority of bottom fish live after being tossed back, go ahead and believe. I do not believe.
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Old 10-15-2018, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by SeaJay View Post
If you want to keep believing that the vast majority of bottom fish live after being tossed back, go ahead and believe. I do not believe.
I rely on scientific studies, personally. This post was talking about inshore species, so not sure why you are talking about bottomfish (I assume you mean deep water fish). IIRC George Beckwith's study on red drum survival rates in NC was around 95% for drum caught using large circle hooks and the "Lupton Rig". Longer leaders and j-hooks had a slightly lower survival rate due to more deep hooking, but still around 80-85% IIRC.

Even deepwater fish have a fairly high chance of survival if appropriate action is taken such as venting or fish descenders such as the seaqualizer. Some studies have shown survival rates over 80% for released bottomfish using the seaqualizer.

That said, there is always going to be mortality from both catch and release and catch and keep. If you don't like killing fish, don't fish. That's the only way to have a 100% survival rate

Last edited by N2theblue; 10-15-2018 at 10:49 AM.
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Old 10-15-2018, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by SeaJay View Post
If you want to keep believing that the vast majority of bottom fish live after being tossed back, go ahead and believe. I do not believe.
I understand your comment but I believe the ratio of fish that survive depends on the depth in which they were caught and how they are handled on board. I fish in SWFL and the water depth, even when 30 miles offshore, is only about 70 ft. deep. If the fish are handled properly, i.e. not held by the gill plate or kept out of the water for pictures, I would estimate that the vast majority of fish that we release survive quite well. As a matter of fact I have been broken off by big grouper only to catch that same fish 3o minutes later with my broken off leader and hook still in it's jaw. In addition I have caught Goliath Grouper and it's not uncommon to remove 3 or 4 hooks from it's jaw before releasing it.
Now I do believe mortality rates increase significantly as water depth increases beyond 100 ft. I believe this is known as barotrauma and I know this was the theory behind venting tools which I understand has not gone well at all. I also know there are other devices for returning fish to deep water but I have never used those devices and know very little about them.
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Old 10-15-2018, 04:16 PM
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Originally Posted by SeaJay View Post
If you want to keep believing that the vast majority of bottom fish live after being tossed back, go ahead and believe. I do not believe.
this is about inshore charters. No one is pulling up fish from depths where bottom fish have a high release mortality
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Old 10-17-2018, 11:03 AM
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In my region in Florida the redfish limit is ONE and the trout limit is 5. On a good day with a good tide we could probably "limit" in 20 minutes. If the customer wants to stay and fish, they do. If all they care about is "meat fishing" then either we'll go after something else or head in, but people here pay for a half day trip and that's what they'll get regardless of how many fish are caught.
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Old 10-17-2018, 12:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Jim311 View Post
In my region in Florida the redfish limit is ONE and the trout limit is 5. On a good day with a good tide we could probably "limit" in 20 minutes. If the customer wants to stay and fish, they do. If all they care about is "meat fishing" then either we'll go after something else or head in, but people here pay for a half day trip and that's what they'll get regardless of how many fish are caught.
I don't know where you are located but in SWFL we have to fish all day to catch our limit and rarely do we succeed. In our area fishing has gone from bad to worse and i'm sure the latest red tide event will only make it worse yet.
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Old 10-17-2018, 12:38 PM
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I did salmon charters up north before moving to TX. We did come in early on 6 hour trips if we limited out. There is not much more to catch than salmon or trout and once you limit out, you have to pull lines. You can continue to fish and CNR once your box is full.

Sure there are smallies and pike, but the salmon charters are just not set up to go after them on those rare occasions. We used to have an option to stay out for Yellow Perch, but they got completely fished out to near extinction.
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