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Does a 60", 80-150, 2-PIECE Stubby make sense?

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Does a 60", 80-150, 2-PIECE Stubby make sense?

Old 09-14-2018, 08:47 AM
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Default Does a 60", 80-150, 2-PIECE Stubby make sense?

I will have several opportunities to travel where I will troll off of sailboats. I hate paying luggage fees for an oversized rod bag, but I would hate even more if a sub-standard travel rod cracks at a beginning of a 2-week sailing trip. So I am thinking of bringing a gun to a knife fight...a rod I could pack and which would be sturdy enough not to worry about breakage if I happen to hook into something big. And one I could use for some jigging in a pinch (not a must). I don't mind winching smaller fish using such an implement; the key here is two-fold - must be packable and sturdy as hell.

So I thought about a custom, 60" 2-piece stubby-style rod, with the longer piece no longer than 36" (for packing), 80-150 class, quality roller guides, top guide on a pivot. Do these parameters even make sense? Is the length ratio of handle to a blank correct for such a rod to work?

Thanks
Old 09-14-2018, 01:19 PM
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IMO a standard deep drop rod with a detachable straight butt would accomplish what you're trying to do without something that sounds difficult to construct ($). If you're stuck on a longer overall rod, I'd imagine it would have to be built similar to a 2-pc gaff in that heavy an application.
Old 09-14-2018, 05:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Southern Hooker View Post
IMO a standard deep drop rod with a detachable straight butt would accomplish what you're trying to do without something that sounds difficult to construct ($). If you're stuck on a longer overall rod, I'd imagine it would have to be built similar to a 2-pc gaff in that heavy an application.
Thanks. That is exactly what John from Pinnacle Marine suggested - the Eliminator 100. Reasonably priced, sturdy as hell, the longest piece is 36". I am in contact with John on details.
Old 09-14-2018, 06:35 PM
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Handlines work too. If you get something real big, just take a couple of turns around the winch. :-)
Old 09-14-2018, 09:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Capt. Fred View Post
Handlines work too. If you get something real big, just take a couple of turns around the winch. :-)
Spoken like a true died in the wool blow boater............trolling? don't need no stinking rod to troll........that's a waste of money........just hand line it.
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Old 09-16-2018, 07:29 AM
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I would think a hand line would be your best bet as well, we use them on the tug while in transit.
Old 09-17-2018, 05:17 PM
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I was only half joking. I've actually caught lots of fish on handlines. Bluefin, yellowfin, albacore, and bigeye tuna. I used to use them as my flatlines close to the boat. One summer, I worked on a commercial swordfishing boat and trolled my handlines most of the time we were running while at sea. The boat was originally built as a dragger and had a sloped rear deck down to the water. Me and another guy set up two lawn chairs on the back deck and trolled green machines on two handlines. We caught several bigeye and yellowfin. With two guys yanking, the fish don't stand a chance. 30 seconds after they hit the lure they'd be sliding up that rear slope. Bleed 'em, gut 'em and pack them in the ice in the hold.

Unless it is a huge fish, a handline is the most efficient way to drag a fish to the boat. Once their head is pointed towards you, yank like hell. Fish don't swim backwards real well. Not very sporting, but it works.
Old 09-17-2018, 06:14 PM
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The cat I will be on (Helia 44) is wide, so I can set up a mini-spread - rods on port and starboard and a flatline handline in the center. The wife thinks it will be a sailing cruise, but my plan is to make a sportfisher out of that cat!
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Old 09-18-2018, 04:27 PM
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I think Abraham Lincoln said that "any boat is a sportfisher, if you're brave enough."
Old 09-18-2018, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Capt. Fred View Post
I think Abraham Lincoln said that "any boat is a sportfisher, if you're brave enough."

I think you are right!

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