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75 miles offshore in a 21' boat?

Old 05-29-2016, 04:29 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by Lone Ono View Post
But, like always, YOURS IS BETTER!
Another thread where you chime in with noisebut dont answer the op question. Im sure you think its ok.
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Old 05-29-2016, 04:42 AM
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Default I wasn't asking permission.

This thread is getting good. Glad to hear all the responses. That was the farthest I have ever been in my boat. The fish were there, we had the window, the fuel, and the guts, all over the deck to prove it. Can things go wrong, yes, but without risk there is no reward. My mate, Scott is a true pro, that I can tell you without doubt. I won't appoligiz for having the guts to do this. If I get picked up by tonado, wich from someone of these posts is sure to happen soon, then I guess that's how I'll go. I've only got a few mates I would do this with. I'd never take someone without good sea legs and experience, out on a trip like this.
A TV show, Blue Water Maham, is shooting on my man's boat, small boat big fish episode. Hopefully I'll make his crew for that.
Anyway keep the posts coming, you can't hurt my feelings. To the guys that do while others watch from the couch, good on you, and keep it up!
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Old 05-29-2016, 05:16 AM
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Originally Posted by schoolsout1 View Post
Usually, when I hear of a boat going down near here, it's a larger boat. Lots to go wrong on big boats that sit in water and have shafts sticking through the bottom of the hull as well as other thru-hulls. All I'm saying is there seems to be a lot of nancies on here and I'm crazy for trying to fish the other side of the stream 100+ miles out in a 26' CC, too Hey, you could die driving down the road or going offshore. It's all a calculated risk...
Totally agree. 401 hits it on the head though. His bad experience has given him wisdom. The quandary is the only way you get wisdom is from bad experiences. Not from an internet lecture by a dock captain. Now if the guy in the slip with a seasoned boat who you know is a regular out there says there is something making him nervous about a trip you would be wise to listen...
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Old 05-29-2016, 05:32 AM
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Two things that I would not get on that boat without that far offshore.

Life raft

A Sea anchor of what I have not seen mentioned.

Not sure of the water temps where you are fishing but anything under 80 degrees can become a real problem in short order if you go in. You need to get out if the water and into a raft.

A 21 foot boat without power is a sitting duck in rough seas without a sea anchor.

A good operator with good skills can take some bad seas with a 21 foot boat under power. You lose power and your toast before you know it.
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Old 05-29-2016, 05:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Lone Ono View Post
But, like always, YOURS IS BETTER!
Everytime I see a Tunee post, I just remember him saying his drags (strike, mind you) are set at 45lb as he runs his lines through his non:black mono halyards...
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Old 05-29-2016, 05:35 AM
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Originally Posted by gumpire View Post
Curious ... What is your range fuel wise?
We Covered 189 Miles On 64 agl. Averaged 2.95 mies per gallon. We had 16 gallons to spare or about another 50 miles in the tank. A little tight, I will admit that. Probably will look into small bladder for the ride out for some more cushion in the range deprtment. I'm sure the same guys are gonna say I'm crazy for this also.
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Old 05-29-2016, 05:36 AM
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Originally Posted by 401 CAYE View Post
Lots of bravado in some of these posts.. I have taken a 23 footer with a single out 55nm and had no issues..
I have also taken a 26 Glacier bay cat with twins out 40 miles and been caught in a squall so bad it broke welds and ripped the radar off the top of the boat. Seas went from slick to completely unmanageable in about 10 minutes. We were unable to take the seas on the bow, which in a glacier bay is saying something. We definitely could not run side sea, so we put them on the stern and fought from broaching for 45 minutes. We were standing in ankle deep water.. everybody had life jackets on.. we were literally fighting to keep the boat afloat. Winds in that storm cell hit 65kts. It was all over in under an hr.. the radio was lit up with distress calls from other boats. Coast guard had their hands full and I damn sure wouldn't have wanted to depend on them that day, too many others were.
That day was a 10 out of 10 type day.. slick seas, blue sky.. We saw the storm coming on XM weather, as well as radar. We were actually picked up and running north as the marine weather was indicating a severe cell moving at over 50 mph. Guess what, our boat was a 25kt boat. That storm closed on us so fast I watched it come up our wake line and blow our wake sideways like driving rain. The wind hit us 90 degrees off port, flat broadside.. it heeled the boat over so hard I thought we were going over.
In the end we survived.. largely because 2 out of 5 of us had been in bad shit before and kept working at it to keep from losing control. I bailed as much water as I could while directing the driver when to throttle based on waves about to break over our stern. The 3 people we took that day were terrified to the point of being incapacitated. Through the whole ordeal nobody on our vessel made a distress call.. we were simply too saturated with trying to maintain control.. that could have been a critical mistake had we not been able to keep her afloat.
I only tell you this to make you aware how fast things can go to shit out there. If that happened on your boat, would your wife be level headed enough and know what to do?
I think fishing offshore is a matter of risk calculation.. if you have mitigated your risk to a level where you and your crew are completely comfortable then I say go for it. What I find often is the attitude of the captain usually sets the tone for the crew.. if you say its safe to do.. they are going to follow like sheep. You should take the time to really inform them of what can go wrong, and what to do if it does. Best of luck to you, those are some great pictures you posted.. looks like you have caught the only keeper that matters anyway.. keep her and yourself safe out there!
A buddy of mine had to abandon ship and got picked up by a cruise ship when things got hairy here...he got a free ride to Bermuda
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Old 05-29-2016, 05:42 AM
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[QUOTE=20biminitwist;9078896]Two things that I would not get on that boat without that far offshore.

Life raft

A Sea anchor of what I have not seen mentioned.

I do have a sea anchor, ditch bag with eperb, flares, food, water, handheld vhf. I would feel better with a raft. I've mitigated risk best I can by keeping my rig tip top and have good gear.
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Old 05-29-2016, 05:44 AM
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We could see and had radio contact with multiple vessels throughout the day.
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Old 05-29-2016, 05:46 AM
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Originally Posted by schoolsout1 View Post
Everytime I see a Tunee post, I just remember him saying his drags (strike, mind you) are set at 45lb as he runs his lines through his non:black mono halyards...
LOL . You have to be careful about the things you say...
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Old 05-29-2016, 06:19 AM
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[QUOTE=hiliner222gypsy;9078928]
Originally Posted by 20biminitwist View Post
Two things that I would not get on that boat without that far offshore.

Life raft

A Sea anchor of what I have not seen mentioned.

I do have a sea anchor, ditch bag with eperb, flares, food, water, handheld vhf. I would feel better with a raft. I've mitigated risk best I can by keeping my rig tip top and have good gear.
Copy That but I will post this link as the hypothermia aspect scares me the worst.

Where I live it still gets cold enough in the winter to really cut your chances of survival if you had to ditch. If a SAR is launched there is a very good chance you are going to be in the water more than 2 hours. These type of things usually happen when conditions will hamper a quick rescue.

http://westpacmarine.com/samples/hypothermia_chart.php
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Old 05-29-2016, 06:46 AM
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Ten miles 75 miles, what difference does it make. Did lots of SAR during my career. Lots of bad stuff happens near shore. Your not walking home. I looked for 5 members of a coastal freighter crew, within sight of land. Four of them drowned before we found the 5th. Found him on day 5. Risk versus reward. You go out the pass you are taking a chance. Nice run good to see you had a great day.
Ed
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Old 05-29-2016, 06:55 AM
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Default Great Thread !

Originally Posted by slipkid View Post
I didn't look close enough to know where the OP is from but depending on where he is you might be wrong. On a nice day in NJ you will probably find 100 boats 75 miles out at the chicken hole and maybe 200 boats 100 miles off at the Hudson.


These posts are rediculous. Some people are afraid to leave the inlet
Some afraid to leave sight of land. Some afraid to be out at night. Personally, I'd be at my happiest chugging to Bermuda or across the gulf to Mexico. Everybody is a product of their experiences and some people build on them and some people regress from them. Only you can decide how far offshore you should be.

Usually a good ass kicking leads to wanting a bigger boat though.
Slipkid hit a home run once again - illustrating some people just can't handle seeing other skippers do comfortably do what they personally are uncomfortable doing.

The OP asked a very simple question: Who takes their small boat out 75 mile offshore? I have done it in my 21 foot, 18 degree deadrise, and done it within my comfort zone.

If that is not within your comfort zone, I won't be the one to call you a nancie - but I'll wink at you if you presume to question why I don't have two engines, or why I don't have a life raft, or: fill in the blank. News Flash: "You go watch Gilligan Island, we'll go fishin'."

Oh, and the coasties live for the glory and moral advantage of saving people or they wouldn't be in the business. Ask a rescue jumper - "Would you rather be doing what you have trained so hard for, or would you rather that boaters never need what you can do for them".

To answer the OP, "Hey, brother - I've gone far out regularly when the weather is good and the fish are biting. See you out there, and save some fish for me. Oh, and you're boat is so MONEY".

Just my point of view, your mileage may vary, T.
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Old 05-29-2016, 06:59 AM
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Originally Posted by TUNEE View Post
In my opinion coming from someone who has spent a lot of time offshore, as beautiful as your boat is, you don't have enough dead rise or beam width to handle an unpredicted change in the weather for a 21 foot boat to be 75 miles from shore. A stronger than forecast wind against tide, a nasty ground squall or a severe thunderstorm can ruin a blue bird day in a small boat. An inlet can be dangerous for larger boats. Great pictures BTW.
How much dead rise and beam is acceptable?
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Old 05-29-2016, 06:59 AM
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A beauty of a boat btw.
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Old 05-29-2016, 07:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Warlock View Post
Single motor alone does not belong 75 miles off..
Tell that to thousands of commercial fisherman running single screws 100+ nm.
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Old 05-29-2016, 07:10 AM
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"Oh, and the coasties live for the glory and moral advantage of saving people or they wouldn't be in the business. Ask a rescue jumper - "Would you rather be doing what you have trained so hard for, or would you rather that boaters never need what you can do for them".

WHAT?

I believe they would rather not recover a body from someone who did not mitigate their risk.

Search and rescue is made possible by those who prepare for emergency situations. Go back and read my previous post and the link provided to hypothermia. You go into the water where the OP is today and you could very well be unconscious within 2 hours depending on your physical condition.

There is a big difference between being a Nancy and being stupid.
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Old 05-29-2016, 07:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Fish'nFool View Post
Tell that to thousands of commercial fisherman running single screws 100+ nm.
Yep,

That is why they are required by law to carry all of the extra safety gear of which includes a life raft.
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Old 05-29-2016, 07:27 AM
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I fish offshore (50 to 60 miles) on a regular basis with my first and only mate (wife Cheryl) from the deck of our 210 Ventura a 21' Boston Whlaer. We carry a Fiorentino Para Anchor and 600' of anchor line. We have a large orange rubber float that attaches to para anchor for easy retreival. Ya just never know when you might need one. We also can set it up on a beam bridle if necessary. My wife and I practice once a year deploying this item been doing it for 15 years. We carry an ditch bag EPRIB PLB's and all the associated safety items you'd find in a well stocked ditch bag. We also carry a life raft file float plans etc. With any thing associated with the ocean is dangerous I've learned one thing in the 60 year's I've been doing this if something doesn't feel right then it's not follow your instincts plan for the worst and enjoy the adventure.

My wife and I do have fun .....

https://vimeo.com/home/myvideos/page...e/format:video

10 miles seaward of Big Rock about 55 miles offshore ......

http://bluewaterpirate.phanfare.com/3341636_3667873

45 mikes SE of Cape Hatteras ...... Rock Pile area

http://bluewaterpirate.phanfare.com/5782498_6594299







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Old 05-29-2016, 07:48 AM
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And we've had some out of body experiences ... I've been using XM Weather since late 2005. A few years ago we were fishing the the Rise area and knew we had to head to the barn by noon front coming. We started back in at 1130am and enroute we heard a call on the radio from another fisherman who had engine trouble so we deviated to help. By the time we started back in it was too late so we could see on XM the front was laying just offshore and stationary. We waited about 6 hours for a break in the storms but there was none. Finally around 10PM we saw a break. We notified the CG of our location and plans and they put us on a watch. We finally got dockside around 1am. Thunderstorms at night over the water are impressive. We were able to pick our way thru using XM weather.

http://bluewaterpirate.phanfare.com/5106277_5928591
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