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Mahi parasite - IDENTIFIED!

Old 08-29-2012, 06:47 AM
  #81  
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Originally Posted by HeadHunt View Post
Courtesy of Dr. Ray Waldner, ichthyologist from Florida Atlantic University, the ugly critters have been identified as parasitic copepods, possibly Pennella filosa, or a related copepod species. They do not harm the food quality of the fish, just the consumer's appetite.

Copepods are crustaceans (like shrimp are). The more common copepods are part of the plankton and are a major component of the diet of small fish. Somehow this makes me feel a little better (or a little less disgusted ) about the whole thing...
Will still be examining my fish more carefully, from now on...
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Old 08-29-2012, 07:46 AM
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They still look nasty!
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Old 08-29-2012, 08:24 AM
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Well, I did consume sushi yesterday for lunch. Sushi chef says fish is flash frozen then shipped as "fresh" but is never froze again. It was tasty. Love spicy tuna! However, I did think a little bit about these parasites before eating. I still ate it all. I guess I place too much faith that the restaraunts wouldn't serve me bad items. It's just my expectation of a quality place. I will second I would rather eat raw fish than raw hamburger!!!
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Old 08-29-2012, 08:47 AM
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Great thread. It makes me feel like I got away with being real sick a few years ago. We caught some nice black-fin tunas and was wondering what it would be like to have this super fresh sushi. I literally steaked the tuna, took out a chunk of meat and ate it. It was awesome and promised myself when I do catch em, I will conduct the same ritual. After reading this thread, I hope I keep missing them.. For me, the bottom line is that I will leave the fish for the grill, the oven or pan..
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Old 08-29-2012, 09:05 AM
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I've had the thread worms from sushi once. Saki killed them, but i've taken sushi off of my list of foods. There is a reason we cook things.
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Old 08-29-2012, 09:11 AM
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When I doubt whether something was cooked or not, I just take a shot of rum or vodka or scotch. I use what's called the carpet-bomb aproach-- Kills everything!
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Old 08-29-2012, 12:43 PM
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how to you flash freeze raw fish? i have a bait cooler that I keep at about 10 degrees. can i place it in there for some time? if so, how long? thanks
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Old 08-29-2012, 12:58 PM
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I bet some of you on here may have serious parasites or worms that big in your bellies.......
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Old 08-29-2012, 01:25 PM
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Originally Posted by alacrity View Post
how to you flash freeze raw fish? i have a bait cooler that I keep at about 10 degrees. can i place it in there for some time? if so, how long? thanks

Here are the FDA guidelines. By the way, I once visited a major Salmon producer in Chile that did just that (flash freeze) to virtually all their fish.

From the FDA site:

Controlling parasites
The process of heating raw fish sufficiently to kill bacterial pathogens is also sufficient to kill parasites. Guidance concerning cooking and pasteurizing to kill pathogens is provided in Chapters 16 and 17. Regulatory requirements for retorting (low acid canned foods) are contained in 21 CFR 113. This Guide does not provide further guidance on retorting.

The effectiveness of freezing to kill parasites depends on several factors, including the temperature of the freezing process, the length of time needed to freeze the fish tissue, the length of time the fish is held frozen, the fat content of the fish, and the type of parasite present. The temperature of the freezing process, the length of time the fish is held frozen, and the type of parasite appear to be the most important factors. For example, tapeworms are more susceptible to freezing than are roundworms. Flukes appear to be more resistant than roundworms.

Freezing and storing at -4F (-20C) or below for 7 days (total time), or freezing at -31F (-35C) or below until solid and storing at -31F (-35C) or below for 15 hours, or freezing at -31F (-35C) or below until solid and storing at -4F (-20C) or below for 24 hours is sufficient to kill parasites. FDA's Food Code recommends these freezing conditions to retailers who provide fish intended for raw consumption.

Note: these conditions may not be suitable for freezing particularly large fish (e.g. thicker than six inches).

The effectiveness of hydrostatic pressure in the elimination of parasites from fish flesh is being studied.

Brining and pickling may reduce the parasite hazard in a fish, but they do not eliminate it, nor do they minimize it to an acceptable level. Nematode larvae have been shown to survive 28 days in an 80 salinometer brine (21% salt by weight).

Fish that contain parasites in their flesh may also contain parasites within their egg skeins, but generally not within the eggs themselves. For this reason, eggs that have been removed from the skein and rinsed are not likely to contain parasites.

Trimming away the belly flaps of fish or candling and physically removing parasites are effective methods for reducing the numbers of parasites. However, they do not completely eliminate the hazard, nor do they minimize it to an acceptable level.

http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceComp.../ucm091704.htm
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Old 08-29-2012, 02:04 PM
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Originally Posted by southatlantic View Post
Here are the FDA guidelines. By the way, I once visited a major Salmon producer in Chile that did just that (flash freeze) to virtually all their fish.

From the FDA site:

Controlling parasites
The process of heating raw fish sufficiently to kill bacterial pathogens is also sufficient to kill parasites. Guidance concerning cooking and pasteurizing to kill pathogens is provided in Chapters 16 and 17. Regulatory requirements for retorting (low acid canned foods) are contained in 21 CFR 113. This Guide does not provide further guidance on retorting.

The effectiveness of freezing to kill parasites depends on several factors, including the temperature of the freezing process, the length of time needed to freeze the fish tissue, the length of time the fish is held frozen, the fat content of the fish, and the type of parasite present. The temperature of the freezing process, the length of time the fish is held frozen, and the type of parasite appear to be the most important factors. For example, tapeworms are more susceptible to freezing than are roundworms. Flukes appear to be more resistant than roundworms.

Freezing and storing at -4F (-20C) or below for 7 days (total time), or freezing at -31F (-35C) or below until solid and storing at -31F (-35C) or below for 15 hours, or freezing at -31F (-35C) or below until solid and storing at -4F (-20C) or below for 24 hours is sufficient to kill parasites. FDA's Food Code recommends these freezing conditions to retailers who provide fish intended for raw consumption.

Note: these conditions may not be suitable for freezing particularly large fish (e.g. thicker than six inches).

The effectiveness of hydrostatic pressure in the elimination of parasites from fish flesh is being studied.

Brining and pickling may reduce the parasite hazard in a fish, but they do not eliminate it, nor do they minimize it to an acceptable level. Nematode larvae have been shown to survive 28 days in an 80 salinometer brine (21% salt by weight).

Fish that contain parasites in their flesh may also contain parasites within their egg skeins, but generally not within the eggs themselves. For this reason, eggs that have been removed from the skein and rinsed are not likely to contain parasites.

Trimming away the belly flaps of fish or candling and physically removing parasites are effective methods for reducing the numbers of parasites. However, they do not completely eliminate the hazard, nor do they minimize it to an acceptable level.

http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceComp.../ucm091704.htm
thanks, BTW i've represented some chilean salmon producers who flash freeze using a brine. IIRC, they flash freeze for less than a day.
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Old 08-29-2012, 02:31 PM
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Freezing should be done for all wild animal meat unless you eat everything burnt to a crisp. I like my deer and duck rare so they go in the freeze for a few weeks. Trichinosis
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Old 08-29-2012, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by vsfishon View Post
When I doubt whether something was cooked or not, I just take a shot of rum or vodka or scotch. I use what's called the carpet-bomb aproach-- Kills everything!
A little Lemon or Lime would work....It cooks it chemically, that is why you can use lemon and lime when cleaning cutting boards (like bamboo ones that you don't want to use harsh soaps on) or when cleaning high end knives, it kills many of the bacteria. Or so I have been told it works for me.
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