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Old 04-05-2007, 10:41 PM
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Default Test of Corrosion Inhibitor Sprays

This was in this months Powerboat Reports. I use it as my bible when buying boat products, especially cleaning supplies.

Metal Maintenance: 12 Corrosion Inhibitors (Salt Water) Tested

What keeps corrosion at bay best in the marine environment? We found out by testing a dozen corrosion inhibitors, including products from well-known names such as CRC, WD-40, LPS, and Boeshield. One of mankind’s greatest early achievements was the extraction of pure metal from rock. The process takes ingenuity and consumes vast amounts of energy. So it is with considerable frustration that we watch nature so easily reclaim what we have wrought at such cost. Few are more familiar with corrosion than mariners, who fight a constant battle against it in the salty interface between sea and sky.

Each of the test products was applied to two mild steel strips—one to be suspended in salt water and the other to be sprayed with fresh water. The strips pictured here are post testing; the left strip of each pair is the freshwater panel.
A visit to the hardware store or a search on the Internet reveals no shortage of products to address, and even redress, corrosion—most are touted as being able to penetrate ("frees rusted parts"), lubricate, or protect electrical components. Here we examine the corrosion-inhibiting properties.

What We Tested
We chose the products based largely on their advertized claims and also on how easy they were to find. Several are available in hardware stores. West Marine carries its private-label product, CorrosionPro Lube, as well as CRC Heavy Duty Corrosion Inhibitor, Corrosion Block, Boeshield T-9, and WD-40. CorrosionX, Shark Hide, the LPS products, and TC-11 all popped up during Internet searches. We left out products that made no specific claims for use in the marine environment. Anything that had "rust" and any reference to "marine" or "boats" or "salt spray" was fair game.
Twelve made the roster: PMS Products’ Boeshield T-9; LPS Laboratories’ LPS 1, LPS 2, and LPS 3; Corrosion Technologies Corp.’s CorrosionX and CorrosionX HD; ICC Industries’ TC-11; Lear Chemical Research Corp.’s Corrosion Block; West Marine’s CorrosionPro Lube; CRC Heavy Duty; Shark Hide; and WD-40, because it was already in the workshop.
Each showed different degrees of viscosity, all went on wet, and most stayed wet, or at least tacky. Those that left a waxy coating performed the best in the saltwater test.
None is pleasant to use and all of their containers carry stern warnings about flammability, use in poorly ventilated areas, and against inhaling them. Most use heavier-than-air butane, pentane, or heptane, or a mixture thereof, as propellants, which means there’s a risk of an explosive mixture accumulating in confined spaces such as bilge compartments. Ventilate these areas throroughly before operating anything that might create a spark.
The LPS products use carbon dioxide as propellant, and Corrosion Block nitrogen, but the solvents are still flammable.

Boeshield T-9
According to its maker, Boeshield T-9 is designed for penetration, moisture displacement, lubrication, and rust and corrosion protection. Heavier than some of the other sprays in our test, it dries slightly tacky.
The T-9-coated strip sprayed with fresh water was rust-free after a week. The one submerged in salt water had rust around the screw and at the top after three days. The trend continued through eight days, with more corrosion on the cured side (see sidebar above) than on the uncured side.
Bottom Line: In terms of what our test covered, T-9 works as advertised, even in salt water. Slightly more corrosion at the screw and price edged it out of the top three.

Corrosion Block
Advertised as a corrosion preventor and inhibitor, Corrosion Block is a heavy, blue spray that dries thin, clear, and slightly tacky.
After seven days of freshwater dousing, the Corrosion Block-coated strip showed some rust spots at the top, where we’d expected a thicker coating. The saltwater strip, however, was very rusty after three days—except for an area toward the top. After eight days, it had rust all over it.
Bottom Line: Corrosion Block is OK for freshwater purposes, but not salt water. To be fair, the manufacturer makes no claim regarding rust.

CorrosionPro Lube
West Marine claims its product offers "...excellent water resistance and superior rust and corrosive preventative characteristics." And it does.
This fine spray leaves a visible, amber-colored, waxy coating. The coating remained intact through a week of freshwater dousing, and the metal strip showed no signs of rust. The saltwater strip saw similar success: The coating remained after three days, and there were no signs of rust. It was only after eight days of saltwater abuse that some rust appeared along the "uncured" edge.
Bottom Line: This product does what it claims. The waxy film isn’t pleasant to the touch, but for hard-to-reach parts, it’s on the money.

CorrosionX
This aerosol, which makers claim provides protection against rust and corrosion, initially forms a foamy, blue-green film. The bubbles eventually disappear.
CorrosionX’s freshwater performance was excellent: After seven days, there was no rust and the film was still tacky. (So sticky, in fact, that a few small flies met their end on the metal strip.) Unfortunately, its saltwater efficacy rated at the other end of the spectrum. After eight days, except for a band at the top, the metal strip was very rusty, and particularly corroded around screw.
Bottom Line: CorrosionX works fine in a freshwater environment, but it’s not ready for brine time, especially in a mixed-metal situation.

CorrosionX HD
Think of this as CorrosionX’s big brother: A "high-performance, thick film version of CorrosionX," according to Corrosion Technologies Corp. It comes out as a fine spray with some bubbles and a thick, amber color.
Like its sibling, we rated it Excellent in the freshwater test, but it wasn’t up to the challenge of salt water. The strip in saltwater had a rusty bottom half and a less-rusty top half, almost in proportion to the thickness of its coating. A clear halo appeared where the product accumulated around the nut, and curiously, less corrosion formed on the "uncured" side.
Bottom Line: The sticky film does resist freshwater penetration, but it isn’t immune to salt water, especially for the long term.

CRC Corrosion Inhibitor
CRC Heavy-Duty Corrosion Inhibitor, which is seemingly identical in appearance and performance to CorrosionPro Lube, is made for saltwater use. It claims to protect and preserve metal surfaces subject to salt spray and high humidity. It comes out as a fine spray with a thick coating.
The freshwater test strip still had a sufficient coating and no rust after seven days. It was equally impressive in the saltwater test: coating intact and no rust after eight days.
Bottom Line: Excellent performance. It lives up to its claims.

LPS 1
LPS Labs offers three products with three levels of rust protection. LPS 1 is marketed as a greaseless lubricant that displaces moisture. Colorless, it has a broad spray range.
In the freshwater test, the LPS 1 panel only had some rust on the uncured side after a week. After three days in salt water, the strip was very rusty, except at the top, and by Day 8, it had rusted all over. The brass screw also showed signs of rust, as though iron were being transported to its surface by galvanic action, there to repeat its demise (just a guess).
Bottom Line: LPS literature says the product displaces moisture on electronic components and that its light, greaseless film inhibits corrosion. It doesn’t claim to prevent rust, but it works for fresh water, if given time to cure. The broad spray pattern made it difficult to concentrate the product where it was wanted.

LPS 2
LPS 2 is touted as a multi-purpose lubricant and penetrant with added corrosion protection. It’s a colorless, fine spray with a strong almond odor and broad spray pattern.
The freshwater LPS 2 panel had no rust after three days, but some after seven days; more on the "uncured" side. After three days, the saltwater test strip exhibited extensive rusting, and after eight days, it was completely corroded.
Bottom Line: LPS 2 claims to provide protection indoors for a year, and its performance indicates that as its limit. It is not useful in salt water.

LPS 3
The strongest of the LPS series, LPS 3 claims to be a long-term, heavy-duty rust inhibitor, even in the harshest environment. Its bubbly, thick spray forms a waxy, pale brown coating.

The CRC spray (left) is the least expensive of the three products that showed no rust in saltwater. The CorrosionX HD saltwater panel (right), like several other test panels, had more rust on its bottom half than its top half, and oddly, it had less rust on its “uncured” side.
After a week of freshwater exposure, there was no sign of rust and the coating was still tacky. And even after eight days of saltwater torture, the LPS 3 panel showed no sign of rust and it was still very sticky.
Bottom Line: We tested it under "harsh conditions," and it does what it claims—but it’s not pretty.

Shark Hide
Shark Hide claims to be a protective coating against weathering and salt spray. Marketed mainly to owners of aluminum pontoon boats and similar craft, it lists steel among the surfaces it can be used on.
Unlike the other test products, Shark’s Hide is a thin, colorless liquid—not an aerosol—that wipes on with soft cloth. It’s a thin liquid, and has really nasty solvents (toluene and xylene)—so be sure to apply it in the open air and wear gloves.
The freshwater test strip showed rust spots on the "uncured" side after three days. But there was no rust on the cured side, even after a week.
The saltwater panel’s uncured side was rather rusty after three days, but the other side had only mottled rust. Even after eight days, the coupon wasn’t completely rusted.
Bottom Line: Shark’s Hide works well in fresh water when allowed to cure. And it performed better than expected (Fair) in salt water for having such an invisible coating. It’s easy to apply to large, smooth surfaces, less so to small parts like nuts and bolts.

TC-11
TC-11 is the "complete answer for rust control," according to its maker. The bubbly, blue-green spray forms a thick coating that was still sticky after a week of freshwater exposure. It kept the freshwater panel rust-free after seven days.
The saltwater panel did not fare as well: After three days, it had extensive rusting, and after eight days, only the very top was rust-free.
Bottom Line: This product isn’t the silver bullet—but it works in fresh water.

WD-40
Nearly as ubiquitous as duct tape, WD-40 claims to protect against rust and corrosion.
Although the fine, colorless spray’s coating was dry after a week of freshwater sprays, the panel had no rust.
However, after three days in salt water, the metal strip was completely rusted, except the top. After eight days, only the very top was showing resistance.
Bottom Line: This product works well in fresh water—and makes no greater claims.

Conclusions
Our salt water test is admittedly harsh, and quickly produced results. After three days, most of the steel coupons were significantly rusty. Only three saltwater test panels showed no corrosion: Those coated with CorrosionPro Lube, CRC Heavy Duty, and LPS-3.

Of the remainder, the Boeshield T-9 panel showed the least corrosion, followed by the cured Shark Hide. (The cured vs. non-cured results support the notion that it pays to follow instructions. Most non-cured sides mimicked the control panel.)
In the freshwater test, the Shark Hide remained rust free. It might be the answer for stainless steel rigging, stern rails, etc., because it leaves no sticky residue—however, it’s an expensive solution.
At 63¢ per ounce, CRC gets the Best Buy nod. For day-to-day use, loosening sticky mechanical parts, or softening greasy deposits, WD-40 works and is inexpensive.
In our opinion, the perfect solution still evades us. Where iron-based alloys are unavoidable and stainless steel isn’t suitable, the best protection against the ravages of salt water is a coat of paint.
Where paint isn’t an option, long-term protection against rust requires the use of sticky, dirt-attracting coatings, like the top performers in this test.

PMS Products Inc. (Boeshield T-9), 800/962-1732,
boeshield.com
Lear Chemical Research Corp. (Corrosion Block), 800/256-2548,
learchem.com
West Marine (Corrosion Pro Lube), 800/685-4838,
westmarine.com
Corrosion Technologies Corp.,

(CorrosionX, CorrosionX HD), 877/577-5803,
corrosionx.com
CRC Industries Inc., 800/556-5074,
crcindustries.com
LPS Laboratories, 800/241-8334,
lpslabs.com
Shark Hide Marine Sales, 800/210-1360,
sharkhidemarinesales.com
ICC Industries (TC-11), 877/240-7806,
tc-11.com
WD-40, 800/448-9340,
wd40.com
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Old 04-05-2007, 11:01 PM
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I think PBR does a good report and over the last 10 years in maintaining my boats in S fla I've honestly tried them all. I have finally settled on CRC 656 for the following reasons:
1. a gallon is a good value
2. it does not leave a waxy residue that sometimes becomes a hassle if you want to get things apart again
3. It goes in a home depot spray bottle that you can set on "stream" and really get stuff in the bilge far away frpm you for a good coating...

Downside is being thin, the boat needs to be sprayed every 90 days or so - and that's fine with me....
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Old 04-05-2007, 11:56 PM
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wow...the one i use didnt do so well
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Old 04-06-2007, 02:02 AM
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cgrand - 4/5/2007 10:56 PM

wow...the one i use didnt do so well
What does Better ****-Ass Magazine recommend?










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Old 04-06-2007, 08:31 AM
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do you realized pbr is a subscription based magazine/website and the only way they make money is by selling their test write-ups? i am betting you aren't posting this with malicious intent, but it is not appropriate imo.
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Old 04-06-2007, 02:49 PM
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Bullshipper - 4/6/2007 12:02 AM

cgrand - 4/5/2007 10:56 PM

wow...the one i use didnt do so well
What does Better ****-Ass Magazine recommend?


hog fat, if you must know
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Old 04-06-2007, 07:14 PM
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We use squeezings from nutria nuts, so you guys sound pretty tame.
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Old 04-06-2007, 10:05 PM
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chainsaw42 - 4/6/2007 7:31 AM

do you realized pbr is a subscription based magazine/website and the only way they make money is by selling their test write-ups? i am betting you aren't posting this with malicious intent, but it is not appropriate imo.
Good point.
I can, however, vouch for CorrosionPro Lube. West marine brand name.
Believe it or not it works just as well, if not better than the top rated anti-corrosion sprays available. I am sure someone on this site will disagree based on the loyalty to CRC, ect...
I would be happy to post a pic of my 20 yo Johnson 225.
One more important note regarding CorrosionPro Lube. It costs $7.
Just my .02. take it or leave it.
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Old 04-06-2007, 10:38 PM
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Where do you guys spray this stuff....everywhere under the cowling?
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Old 04-06-2007, 10:51 PM
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"do you realized pbr is a subscription based magazine/website and the only way they make money is by selling their test write-ups? i am betting you aren't posting this with malicious intent, but it is not appropriate imo."

But how many guys will subscribe now.
I let it run out now I relize how much I've missed.
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Old 04-07-2007, 12:17 AM
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What bothers me is that Powerboat Reports tried to assess several corrosion inhibitors' efficacy by looking at their ability to retard rust formation - the folks who run this publication should know better! Rust and corrosion are different chemical processes, which renders test results on products such as CorrosionX, Corrosion Block, and CorrosionX HD invalid. It's sort of like testing how well different motor oils work in oil lamps - motor oils aren't designed for this task, so the results would be meaningless. Powerboat Reports should be testing corrosion inhibitors against corrosion and rust preventatives, which include products like Boeshield T-9 and LPS-3, against rusting. There was a test done a couple of decades ago - and it may have been done by Powerboat Reports - which concluded that Vaseline worked better than either Boeshield or LPS-3 in preventing rust in a saltwater environment.
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Old 04-07-2007, 02:59 AM
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Bullshipper - 4/6/2007 6:14 PM We use squeezings from nutria nuts, so you guys sound pretty tame.


How do you get the nutria to stand still for that? You ever get an up close look at them big orange teeth?
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Old 04-07-2007, 02:59 PM
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Good point about posting a PBR report. If you subscribe to the mag, you have access to their web site based copy of the mag. and can read all the articles there. The pictures are better on the web than on the black and white magazine. Anything on their web site can be copied easily and stored for future reference. Not sure if copying and posting from their web site is inappropriate, it probably is, but they do not make any effort to prevent it or have any disclaimers against it.

I have always used WD-40 on my reels and fishing rods. After reading the report, I will switch to Boeshield. I tried a can of that a long time ago and it seemed like a similar type of spray.

Three of the sprays are sticky gooey coatings that seal anything you spray them on. I would not put this type on a fishing reel. I tried the CRC spray on some bare steel in my bilge and it did a good job, but you don't want to touch it after it is coated.

Ray's comment may relate to the three sticky sprays, although I always considered rust as a form of corrosion. What is the difference between rust and corrosion. I know corrosion has several forms (chemical, galvanic, crevice crack, and rust) and I considered rust the oxidation form of corrosion. Seems the corrosion inhibitors prevent rust, and I agree the test does not prove if they prevent other forms of corrosion, but around boats, rust is a biggie.
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Old 04-07-2007, 03:22 PM
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It will be interesting to see if Tiara33 gets a call from PBR's lawyer for copyright infringement. Though, I'd think they're probably happy to get the free advertising on THT. I was surprised at the results. I've been using Corrosion Block and Corrosion X for years. I'll definitely give the CRC Heavy Duty and West Marines generic of the same a try. I just got my copy of PBR in the mail and had just read the article this morning.

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Old 04-07-2007, 05:11 PM
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Tiara33 - 4/7/2007 1:59 PM Ray's comment may relate to the three sticky sprays, although I always considered rust as a form of corrosion. What is the difference between rust and corrosion. I know corrosion has several forms (chemical, galvanic, crevice crack, and rust) and I considered rust the oxidation form of corrosion. Seems the corrosion inhibitors prevent rust, and I agree the test does not prove if they prevent other forms of corrosion, but around boats, rust is a biggie.
You'e absolutely right; rust is a product formed by the corrosion (oxidation, in this case) of iron. I was thinking in terms of galvanic corrosion, which occurs on metals besides iron and that products like Corrosion Block and CorrosionX are very effective at preventing. The Powerboat Reports analysis ignored everything but rusting, which isn't a good indication of a product's ability to inhibit most forms of corrosion. Be careful of WD-40; at one time it was used at Pratt Whitney but its use was discontinued when it was shown that it actually promotes corrosion, apparently due to its low pH. Products such as LPS-3 and Boeshield work by leaving a waxy film on the surface they're sprayed on, which may not be desirable on the outside of a reel (but would be fine on iron blocks, risers, and oil pans). On items such as aluminum blocks and the like, products such as CorrosionX HD work well.
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Old 04-07-2007, 05:29 PM
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When I started boating here in florida in 94 or so I used T-9 exclusivley. I sprayed everything. Then I found a few things I needed to take apart again. it was a mess. I don't see hoiw youo would use it on a reel. That's why I like CRC 656 - not their heavy duty stuff. It protects but leaves no huge buildup after years...Corrosion X is the same way...
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Old 04-07-2007, 05:33 PM
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Try Simonize Paste Wax. It might be a pain to apply but it darn sure works better than anything I have found so far.
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Old 04-07-2007, 07:48 PM
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Right or wrong.

I want to epoxy paint anything that goes in the water, and I rinse that off with fresh water when it comes out, right? Nothing like unpainted steel of mine stays in salt water a day or a week, so I really wonder about the whole validity of this test.

I use spray oil on electrical connections only and find that if done regularily, I have no problem even with wd40 that cleans and leaves a little protection.

But on electrical stuff that I don't want to look at again for a while, I use liquid tape neoprene, or spray paint where it won't show to form a barrier that is tougher than any waxy film.

Si or no?
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Old 04-08-2007, 12:29 AM
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bravajo - 4/6/2007 9:38 PM

Where do you guys spray this stuff....everywhere under the cowling?
I completely coat the entire engine with the stuff.
I will not spray this on any fishing gear at all. I have used silicone spray like Reel Majic for that and it seem to work well.
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Old 04-08-2007, 11:39 AM
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Bullshipper - 4/7/2007 6:48 PM

Right or wrong.

I want to epoxy paint anything that goes in the water, and I rinse that off with fresh water when it comes out, right? Nothing like unpainted steel of mine stays in salt water a day or a week, so I really wonder about the whole validity of this test.

I use spray oil on electrical connections only and find that if done regularily, I have no problem even with wd40 that cleans and leaves a little protection.

But on electrical stuff that I don't want to look at again for a while, I use liquid tape neoprene, or spray paint where it won't show to form a barrier that is tougher than any waxy film.

Si or no?
Painting works well as long as saltwater doesn't penetrate the paint. If it does, corrosion can develop underneath the paint and the paint will exacerbate the problem by keeping water in contact with the underlying metal.

Products such as CorrosionX and Corrrosion Block also work great on electrical connections since preventing anodic or galvanic corrosion, rather than rust, are the main considerations, and these products have an extremely high dielectric constant (they don't conduct electricity). Bob Schneider had a Corrosion Block display in his old tackle/lure shop; it consisted of a small, operating television that was submerged in an aquarium filled with Corrosion Block. Pretty impressive!
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