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How long can fresh Mahi be dead and not on ice?

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How long can fresh Mahi be dead and not on ice?

Old 08-23-2019, 12:50 PM
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Default How long can fresh Mahi be dead and not on ice?

If you catch fresh Mahi, bleed it out in a bucket of sea water, then toss in the cooler (ice and water mix), how long between pulling the fish and getting into the ice before the fish is bad?
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Old 08-23-2019, 12:53 PM
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Few hours if not in the sun
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Old 08-23-2019, 01:08 PM
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Depends on your standards? The markets in the Carribbean and South America all day !!!!!!

Practice is from gaff to ice.....
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Last edited by DreamCatcher14; 08-23-2019 at 01:57 PM.
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Old 08-23-2019, 01:48 PM
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I like to put my fish on ice immediately. Fish that go into ice while still alive draw their blood into their internal organs, leaving the meat clean without any blood to spoil it. And the ice also helps firm up the meat. So, the sooner the better.
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Old 08-23-2019, 01:54 PM
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... salt water -ice brine directly after removing the hook ..stay that way til I l fillet and quickly in refrigerator minimum water rinsing
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Old 08-23-2019, 02:33 PM
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To answer the question about how long until it’s “bad”, it won’t go rancid for several hours, it likely won’t rot for several days. But, small changes in flavor and consistency happen fairly quickly. Most prefer fish placed in ice immediately. In Costa Rica the Mahi there set in a cooler with no ice all day without any ill effects. Here in the states most of us throw them directly in the cooler so we don’t have them thrashing around the boat.
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Old 08-23-2019, 05:07 PM
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Perfect. We got carried away catching and the first one I bled out in a bucket of sea water was in there for probably half an hour and the second one maybe 10-15 minutes, then in the ice. The filets look fine. I was concerned because when I pulled them from the bucket they were both bent where the head was on one side of the bucket bottom and the tail was on the other side of the bucket top, if you can picture that. They were stiff like that. When we got back to the dock, having been in ice the ride back, they were still bent. I had to flatten them to cut them up. I was concerned. I was not aware I didn't have to bleed them out. I had been punching holes in the gills and leaving them to bleed for 5-10 minutes before tossing them in the ice to get most of the blood out, but this time that one went much longer and the other went a little longer. So I won't bother bleeding them from now on then. Just straight to the ice.
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Old 08-23-2019, 05:53 PM
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That's no problem
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Old 08-23-2019, 06:34 PM
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Not sure if you want to chance it..send me some and I will test it for you
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Old 08-23-2019, 07:27 PM
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Last month, we had one go mushy in just a few hours, in cool weather, kept in a fish bag with ice bricks. Cool weather being about 75deg F. Good size fish: we fish oly a short distance from camp, and find that we are usually fine , with all species, with a fish bag stowed below deck, loaded up with frozen plastic 2 litre milk bottles. This one was distinctly slimey and mushy, we threw it out. I heard there is a parasite that can affect them? We were in the Indian ocean, NW coast of Australia.
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Old 08-23-2019, 10:43 PM
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Originally Posted by ranmar850 View Post
Last month, we had one go mushy in just a few hours, in cool weather, kept in a fish bag with ice bricks. Cool weather being about 75deg F. Good size fish: we fish oly a short distance from camp, and find that we are usually fine , with all species, with a fish bag stowed below deck, loaded up with frozen plastic 2 litre milk bottles. This one was distinctly slimey and mushy, we threw it out. I heard there is a parasite that can affect them? We were in the Indian ocean, NW coast of Australia.
Good to know. We were considering a fish bag. Sounds like I should pass. We have 2 decent sized fish boxes. If I put 2 baskets of ice (maybe 80 pounds) in one of them, I can make a pretty decent slurry for a few decent fish. If I need more than that, its a VERY good day. Still working on that. Its definitely way cheaper to buy fish at the market.
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Old 08-24-2019, 08:17 AM
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Originally Posted by ranmar850 View Post
Last month, we had one go mushy in just a few hours, in cool weather, kept in a fish bag with ice bricks. Cool weather being about 75deg F. Good size fish: we fish oly a short distance from camp, and find that we are usually fine , with all species, with a fish bag stowed below deck, loaded up with frozen plastic 2 litre milk bottles. This one was distinctly slimey and mushy, we threw it out. I heard there is a parasite that can affect them? We were in the Indian ocean, NW coast of Australia.
Frozen blocks of ice are not good for any fish. They bruise the meat and do not have enough surface contact to properly get the heat out of the fish.

Flaked ice is what almost all commercial boats use. Fish are always the same temp as the water. Decomposition starts fairly fast if you don't get the heat out of them. Bust up those frozen milk jugs!
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Old 08-24-2019, 09:19 AM
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Originally Posted by 20biminitwist View Post
Frozen blocks of ice are not good for any fish. They bruise the meat and do not have enough surface contact to properly get the heat out of the fish.

Flaked ice is what almost all commercial boats use. Fish are always the same temp as the water. Decomposition starts fairly fast if you don't get the heat out of them. Bust up those frozen milk jugs!
How about if you toss the ice jugs in water? Will the cold water due the trick?
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Old 08-24-2019, 10:36 AM
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You should put them on ice immediately.

https://www.fda.gov/food/seafood-gui...-decomposition

What is scombroid poisoning?
Scombroid poisoning is a type of food intoxication caused by the consumption of scombroid and scombroid-like marine fish species that have begun to spoil with the growth of particular types of food bacteria. Fish most commonly involved are members of the Scombridae family (tunas and mackerels), and a few non-scombroid relatives (bluefish, dolphin or mahi-mahi, and amberjacks).
What should one do to avoid scombroid poisoning?
Remember potential scombrotoxic fish belong to a particular group of species that have been allowed to initially spoil. These species should always receive special care in handling, washing, and proper icing, refrigeration or immediate freezing to prevent bacterial growth and spoilage. Studies have demonstrated toxic histamine levels can be generated within less than 6 to 12 hours exposure without ice or refrigeration. This problem is of particular concern immediately after catch aboard a commercial or recreational boat. Likewise, the recreational catch lying on a warm dock or beach is prone to histamine production in certain species.
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Old 08-25-2019, 05:12 AM
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Guys say don't need to bleed them, but you will notice the difference as soon as you cut them if you bleed them first.
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Old 08-25-2019, 05:28 AM
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Bleed them and ice them, there is a difference.
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Old 08-25-2019, 06:37 AM
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Originally Posted by 20biminitwist View Post
Frozen blocks of ice are not good for any fish. They bruise the meat and do not have enough surface contact to properly get the heat out of the fish.

Flaked ice is what almost all commercial boats use. Fish are always the same temp as the water. Decomposition starts fairly fast if you don't get the heat out of them. Bust up those frozen milk jugs!
I realise that, but we are completely limited as to what we can use up there. I worked as a commercial fisherman for many years, some of them on wetfish. I know all about slurries, how to use them and that they are far superior to any other type of ice cooling. Slurries are far better at cooling than packed flake, but, of course a lot more weight is involved. Slurries take the heat out much quicker than packed flake ice, as the ice actually acts as a type of insulation, whereas the movement and flow in slurry ensures it is taken away. Even on my recreational trailer boats, working out of home, I always use slurries. Fish bags, the good ones, like Madfish, are fine for slurry. The scenario I was referring to is that we are camping , totally self-sufficient, remote. No stopping off for bags of ice. We have to re-freeze our blocks in whatever containers they are in, overnight. Running off solar panels charging 12v batteries, with a bit of back-up generator power in the evening. We don't actually kill a lot of fish, due to possession limits on an extended stay, being selective as to what we kill and eating fish every night. So a half dozen 2 litre containers work OK for us. Not optimal, but OK. We've been using this setup for some years now, and this mahi was the first problem we have encountered. We don't even have trouble with the odd Yellowfin Tuna, using this method.
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Old 08-25-2019, 07:41 AM
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Originally Posted by ranmar850 View Post
I realise that, but we are completely limited as to what we can use up there. I worked as a commercial fisherman for many years, some of them on wetfish. I know all about slurries, how to use them and that they are far superior to any other type of ice cooling. Slurries are far better at cooling than packed flake, but, of course a lot more weight is involved. Slurries take the heat out much quicker than packed flake ice, as the ice actually acts as a type of insulation, whereas the movement and flow in slurry ensures it is taken away. Even on my recreational trailer boats, working out of home, I always use slurries. Fish bags, the good ones, like Madfish, are fine for slurry. The scenario I was referring to is that we are camping , totally self-sufficient, remote. No stopping off for bags of ice. We have to re-freeze our blocks in whatever containers they are in, overnight. Running off solar panels charging 12v batteries, with a bit of back-up generator power in the evening. We don't actually kill a lot of fish, due to possession limits on an extended stay, being selective as to what we kill and eating fish every night. So a half dozen 2 litre containers work OK for us. Not optimal, but OK. We've been using this setup for some years now, and this mahi was the first problem we have encountered. We don't even have trouble with the odd Yellowfin Tuna, using this method.
Gotcha in your situation.

We have used slurry water when we were commercial Dolphin fishing. We found and were requested to slurry them for a bit and then move them to ice.

To maintain appearance and quality, fish were not allowed to stay in the slurry water for long periods.

That said, I have on occasion had a box of dolphin and grab one out of the box to clean and the meat would look like YAK!

No idea why but we always tossed it over for the crabs. Maybe just a sick fish.
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Old 08-25-2019, 05:45 PM
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I know for a fact some places in the Caribbean on lil local fishing boats they keep snapper off ice anywhere from 2-14 hours dusk til dawn when the bite is on.
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Old 08-25-2019, 06:23 PM
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Originally Posted by 20biminitwist View Post
Gotcha in your situation.

We have used slurry water when we were commercial Dolphin fishing. We found and were requested to slurry them for a bit and then move them to ice.

To maintain appearance and quality, fish were not allowed to stay in the slurry water for long periods.

That said, I have on occasion had a box of dolphin and grab one out of the box to clean and the meat would look like YAK!

No idea why but we always tossed it over for the crabs. Maybe just a sick fish.
When i first started ewaling with fish for a living, back in tthe eighties, You gutted, gilled and scrubbed them, then packed them in ice. I REALLY don't miss doing that to my share of a tonne and a half of pink snapper, which have a really good array of dorsal and anal fin spikes . Then a buyer said we would accept them whole--what a game changer . But still packed in ice. I think, IIRC, the industry over here went to seawater and (freshwater) ice slurries. The species we were dealing with were largely demersal, and handled the slurries, done right, really well. As we are remote from the market, they could easily be in the slurry for five days before going to market , and were first class. The only issue was what we called "white-eye" --adding salt to the slurry was done for a while, to bring the temp down, but it could cause the eye to freeze slightly, which made them sunken when removed from the slurry, looking like a stale fish. Final trip to market ( 7 or 8 hours in a chiller semi) was done in either the forkable large iceboxes used on board, with the water drained off the slurry, or , if the boat had fixed fibreglass boxes, re-packed into 40 litre tubs with ice, separated by species. I find it interesting that they didn't like the quality of the mahi when a slurry was used--just goes to show that not all species suit it. Good to talk to someone who has done it for a living.

As to the parasite, here is an excerpt from a scientific paper. Sounds like the parasite is Kudoa.

Myoliquefaction occurred post-mortem in wild and cultured mahi mahi, Coryphaena hippurus L., stored on ice, and the flesh disintegrated upon cooking. The condition was associated with multifocal infection of muscle with Kudoa thyrsites (Gilchrist). Histiolysis is presumably due to enzymes excreted by the parasite, including collagenases, as the collagen fibres of the intermyotomal connective tissues were ruptured and hypochromatic. Myofibre changes were limited to hyaline degeneration and loss of myofibrillar detail. Kudoa thyrsites occurs commonly in Australian populations of the type host species,

It is found worldwide, below is a link to one article on it.

Kudoa

Last edited by ranmar850; 08-25-2019 at 06:24 PM. Reason: typo
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