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Haddock fishing at Tillies Legde

Old 06-24-2019, 07:01 AM
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Default Haddock fishing at Tillies Legde

I'm looking to do some offshore haddock fishing on my 30 ft Rampage at Tillies Legde and I'm hoping to pick up some pointers on drift fishing. I understand the haddock are there in the vicinity of 240ft and having no way to anchor at that depth the only way I can figure is to drift fish. I'm thinking of maybe a sea anchor but I'm also concerned about getting tackle caught up in my running gear. Any ideas are greatly appreciated.

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Old 06-24-2019, 08:00 AM
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No way to anchor? Am I missing something? Buy some more rope and add it to your rig. Easy to anchor in just about any depth.
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Old 06-24-2019, 08:23 AM
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I am pretty sure I just heard Hamptonsurf volunteer to go along with you just for the chance to pull up 500+ feet of anchor rode!

And yes, drift fishing is the way to go. The depth has nothing really to do with the need for a sea anchor, that is a function of the wind. I have drift-fished on the bottom in 1000 feet without a sea anchor in light winds.

I am not sure what you concern about tangling is. Just run the sea anchor off your bow, you'll point into the wind, with the sea anchor out there away from the boat and nothing tangles. People do it all the time. Do remember to pull it in before you drive away, however!
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Old 06-24-2019, 03:39 PM
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Drift fishing is not the way to go if you seriously want to get into the haddock.
anchoring is the only truly effective way to fish them.can you catch a few haddock drifting? Of coarse.will you get into them good, no.

Im having trouble understanding why you would have no way to anchor in 250 ft of water. I have probably anchored 15 times this season alone in that depth. Get a ball and ring. It really could not be simpler. What if you lose power ( vhf) chances are slim that you will have cell service. What’s to stop you from drifting to Portugal!?
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Old 06-24-2019, 05:28 PM
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Truth be told I have 400 - 500 ft of line but really don’t expect to hold all that well in 200 to 250ft. More anchor line sounds like the way to go to get at least 3 to 1 scope and lot of hauling. Guess I could go along with the anchoring theory once the fish are found but I may drift with the sea anchor to start. Thanks for the insight!
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Old 06-24-2019, 05:32 PM
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Get a buoy rig and learn how to use it. Anchoring and pulling anchor in <300 ft of water is piece of cake ( and im not talking about using a windless). Pulling 1000ft of slack line across the surface of the water is a walk in the park and well worth catching a pile of fish from a pin point location. There are many threads on here that describe this technique, IMO one of the most valuable skill/tool a bottom fisherman can have in their toolbox.
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Old 06-24-2019, 05:41 PM
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Originally Posted by north coast View Post
Drift fishing is not the way to go if you seriously want to get into the haddock.
anchoring is the only truly effective way to fish them.can you catch a few haddock drifting? Of coarse.will you get into them good, no.

Im having trouble understanding why you would have no way to anchor in 250 ft of water. I have probably anchored 15 times this season alone in that depth. Get a ball and ring. It really could not be simpler. What if you lose power ( vhf) chances are slim that you will have cell service. What’s to stop you from drifting to Portugal!?
I am having trouble understanding why anchoring is truly the only effective way? We have a commercial multi-species permit and anchoring is the last thing we would do. You find a productive drift and work it.

The haddock gaha been in the 170 to 190 foot range. As the water warms up, they will start to go deeper. Use a two hook rig with sinker attached to the bottom. Baiting with clams or squid has been the most productive.
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Old 06-24-2019, 08:39 PM
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Originally Posted by pilotwerxs View Post
I am having trouble understanding why anchoring is truly the only effective way? We have a commercial multi-species permit and anchoring is the last thing we would do. You find a productive drift and work it.

The haddock gaha been in the 170 to 190 foot range. As the water warms up, they will start to go deeper. Use a two hook rig with sinker attached to the bottom. Baiting with clams or squid has been the most productive.
Pilot, I am 100% with you on this. Anchoring over a single spot in 300 feet of water is just not possible without a lot of trial and error. Currents, and winds shift in unpredictable ways and you end up fishing somewhere other than where you wanted. When I drift, I watch the track on the plotter, and I can put the boat right on the productive spots on each drift, over and over. If the productive spot is really small, my drifts might be short, but they are certainly productive. The number of times an anchored boat will out fish a well handled drift boat are really few, and that is not just for haddock.

The other thing that happens when you drift, is you find fish that are not exactly where you might have expected them.

Of course if you don't know how to set up and manage a productive drift...
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Old 06-25-2019, 02:49 AM
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Originally Posted by pilotwerxs View Post
I am having trouble understanding why anchoring is truly the only effective way? We have a commercial multi-species permit and anchoring is the last thing we would do. You find a productive drift and work it.

The haddock gaha been in the 170 to 190 foot range. As the water warms up, they will start to go deeper. Use a two hook rig with sinker attached to the bottom. Baiting with clams or squid has been the most productive.
do you have a multi species permit?
Ive been commercial fishing since I sold bass legally at 16” about 40 years ago.


haddock are VERY smell oriented. When you anchor, start your day by dropping FRESH bait to the bottom every few minutes, don’t leave bait down that is not getting bit. It “ washes out” quickly and they will not find it as easily. I reel up and take the bait off, and put fresh bait on every few minutes, (put the used bait aside for later) you are trying to form a mini chum slick.
The haddock are following your “slick”, from down current, right to you. Once you get a mess of them under the boat you can use the washed out bait. I will usually just keep putting fresh bait down, often bringing the used stuff back to the freezer.

This method is 10 x more effective than drifting.
By Drifting you bump into the occasional fish. Anchoring, you are bringing them to you and usually holding them under the boat .


THATS WHY.

of coarse, if you haven’t yet learned how to anchor in deep water , well ....

Last edited by north coast; 06-25-2019 at 03:01 AM.
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Old 06-25-2019, 05:55 AM
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All good information and thank you to everyone. I've anchored quite accurately in 100 ft with over 300ft of anchor rhode and hauled it using power by armstrong when I was a much younger man. I'm likeing the drift idea until I can get on them and adding a few hundred feet to the anchor ball method to get it back up. This I have done with others but not on my own vessel and would need a lot more rhode. I'm a recreational sort of guy and really don't want to make this to much like "work". However I'd like to add some haddock to fish box!
North Coast - Very Interesting note on the fact that haddock are very smell orientated, one reason I've always felt clams were more effective than jigging.
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Old 06-26-2019, 06:36 AM
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You will catch all the haddock you need drifting. Especially if you don;t know exactly where to go or have little experience anchoring in deep water. Motor drift if you need to. Tillies frequently has a lot of tide, anchoring can sometimes make the lines fish worse than drifting.
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Old 08-13-2019, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by north coast View Post
do you have a multi species permit?
Ive been commercial fishing since I sold bass legally at 16” about 40 years ago.


haddock are VERY smell oriented. When you anchor, start your day by dropping FRESH bait to the bottom every few minutes, don’t leave bait down that is not getting bit. It “ washes out” quickly and they will not find it as easily. I reel up and take the bait off, and put fresh bait on every few minutes, (put the used bait aside for later) you are trying to form a mini chum slick.
The haddock are following your “slick”, from down current, right to you. Once you get a mess of them under the boat you can use the washed out bait. I will usually just keep putting fresh bait down, often bringing the used stuff back to the freezer.

This method is 10 x more effective than drifting.
By Drifting you bump into the occasional fish. Anchoring, you are bringing them to you and usually holding them under the boat .


THATS WHY.

of coarse, if you haven’t yet learned how to anchor in deep water , well ....
coming back to this topic. and yes, i anchor nearly everyday tuna fishing. couple weeks ago the drift was around four knots making it pretty difficult to put bait on the bottom so i decided to give north coast's method a try. dropped the anchor and scoped line out to the exact location i wanted to be. quick drop revealed there was haddock there. grabbed a lobster bait bag and filled it with cut mackerel, added a pound of weight and dropped it down on a rod. and yes he is right. we pulled keeper doubles until we got sick of filling boxes. so i learned something new thanks to north coast.
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Old 08-14-2019, 07:24 AM
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I'm likin' the anchoring idea more and more as last time out the drift worked but not really as well as the initial trip. Back in the day we used to anchor and just haul it in by hand but age has taken it's toll. I've been reluctant to try the anchor ball idea but saw how well it works while out tuna fishing on a friends boat. Recently got the required gear to anchor in 200 + ft and plan on giving it a try. Another interesting point to me regarding the anhoring is that both times out ot Middle Jeffries to haddock fish someone was already anchored exactly on my coordinates - tuna fishing. The numbers are anchient from an old log but apparently holds fish. Also likin' the chum idea - never thought about it for haddock
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Old 08-15-2019, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by BandyLegs View Post
I'm likin' the anchoring idea more and more as last time out the drift worked but not really as well as the initial trip. Back in the day we used to anchor and just haul it in by hand but age has taken it's toll. I've been reluctant to try the anchor ball idea but saw how well it works while out tuna fishing on a friends boat. Recently got the required gear to anchor in 200 + ft and plan on giving it a try. Another interesting point to me regarding the anhoring is that both times out ot Middle Jeffries to haddock fish someone was already anchored exactly on my coordinates - tuna fishing. The numbers are anchient from an old log but apparently holds fish. Also likin' the chum idea - never thought about it for haddock
if you have a windlass, use that. i have 400' of rope and 40' chain on mine and it is all i use. now is the time to haddock fish as nobody is tuna fishing.
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Old 08-15-2019, 01:33 PM
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I usually drift with a sea anchor for cod & haddock. My boat seems to drift very quickly, maybe it's the deep draft but the sea anchor makes it much more manageable. I run it off the bow or off two cleats on the port or starboard. I think there is a little learning curve with them but after 2-3 tries I got pretty comfortable with it.

But whether you are anchoring or drifting when you are fishing, you really should be carrying enough rode to be able to anchor where you are operating your boat. If you lose power or have some sort of boat disabling mishap, you really want to be able to drop an anchor immediately. It's going to be easier for help to find you and of course if the tide is going out you don't have to worry about a Normandy landing being in your future!
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