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Mahi meat

Old 04-30-2019, 11:54 AM
  #41  
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We catch enough that the occasional slimy meat ones never gets used for food.

After seeing the good meat, i can’t being myself to eat the mushy ones.

And they happen ever ever so often and is more indicative of the meat quality versus how you chilled it or handled it.
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Old 04-30-2019, 12:04 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by barrell View Post
I add coconut rum to all my dips. Enough that people taste something tropical but not enough that they can figure it out.
Really? Hm. I might have to try that. Just a little bit?
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Old 04-30-2019, 05:04 PM
  #43  
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Caught a big Dolphin a few years back that had a huge crab caught in it's throat and it was wasting away, had some ugly white meat that was a flag to me as I'd never seen it so white, slimy and sick looking,,,, Had plenty with out it so decided to discard that meat and not risk eating it.
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Old 04-30-2019, 05:12 PM
  #44  
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Yeah dolphin aren't that hard to come by, I'd throw out the discolored meat in a heartbeat and feed the crabs.

So many people love it but dolphin isn't even in my top 10 honestly, it's good but it's definitely not my favorite. I tend to give 90% of it away and just keep a little bit for fresh tacos
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Old 04-30-2019, 05:57 PM
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there was a rather lengthy thread last August-Sept on the Chesapeake & mid Atlantic forum about mahi-crab dip-salad the op was steaming large amounts of mahi & useing it as a substitute in crab dip recipes & several other smoked mahi dip recipes were posted. hope this helps
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Old 04-30-2019, 06:53 PM
  #46  
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I call BS.

Mahi or what ever you want to call them freeze fine and eat great fresh if you handle them properly.

You can't hang them on a bragging board or the lay them out on the hot concrete for pictures.

Those that do could most likely fornicate a free lunch.

I have watched many clean them with city water running all over them the entire time turning the meat into mush from all the rinsing. "yep, chlorides in that water" .

Treat the stuff like a fine steak or a fresh piece of venison and you will be fine. Do you guys run water all over your deer meat while your dressing it. Do you take your steak you just bought and run it under the sink faucet for 10 minutes to get the blood off.

And freezing fish in tap water is a no go. Properly prepare and vacuum seal your fish. Thawing of frozen fish sealed in most tap water turns them into mush.
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Old 04-30-2019, 07:01 PM
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Originally Posted by 20biminitwist View Post
I call BS.

Mahi or what ever you want to call them freeze fine and eat great fresh if you handle them properly.

You can't hang them on a bragging board or the lay them out on the hot concrete for pictures.

Those that do could most likely fornicate a free lunch.

I have watched many clean them with city water running all over them the entire time turning the meat into mush from all the rinsing. "yep, chlorides in that water" .

Treat the stuff like a fine steak or a fresh piece of venison and you will be fine. Do you guys run water all over your deer meat while your dressing it. Do you take your steak you just bought and run it under the sink faucet for 10 minutes to get the blood off.

And freezing fish in tap water is a no go. Properly prepare and vacuum seal your fish. Thawing of frozen fish sealed in most tap water turns them into mush.
I don't know any other way than to use tap water to wash fish off, and have never noticed difference between tap water or well water. I certainly ain't gonna use dirty creek or waterway water
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Old 04-30-2019, 07:04 PM
  #48  
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here's what i was told.

i asked Don Hammond (former SCDNR scientist and previously in charge of the Dolphin Research and Tagging Program). he told me that the meat has microscopic parasites, and safe to eat cooked.

not the answer i wanted to hear.
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Old 04-30-2019, 07:36 PM
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Originally Posted by marsh wabbit View Post
here's what i was told.

i asked Don Hammond (former SCDNR scientist and previously in charge of the Dolphin Research and Tagging Program). he told me that the meat has microscopic parasites, and safe to eat cooked.

not the answer i wanted to hear.
Did you ask what fish is free from "microscopic parasites"?
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Old 04-30-2019, 08:29 PM
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Originally Posted by SWF Pontoon Angler View Post
If they don't taste good to you, you probably don't know how to cook fish
My cooking is not up for debate

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Old 04-30-2019, 11:08 PM
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Originally Posted by FishHarder View Post
My cooking is not up for debate
but your opinion is. to condemn one of the most popular & prolific game fish in the ocean as trife barley fit for human consumption is your opinion but imo a buthead one. hey what's that little peice of raw meat doing there. hmmmmm
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Old 05-01-2019, 03:10 AM
  #52  
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This is possibly the stupidest thread on this entire forum!
Mahi Mahi are renowned throughout the world as top notch table fare.
if you don’t like them, you should take up golf...
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Old 05-01-2019, 03:22 AM
  #53  
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When filleting, we have learned to keep all fish on ice from the second they are caught until the second they get cut up. We use minimal water to rinse each filet and we do not let the meat get contaminated from other fish residues while fileting (as much as is possible anyway). We only pull the fish out of the cooler once it is ready to be cut. We fill individual bags as we go and they go right back into the ice-filled cooler as they are filled one by one where they stay cold until we are home. Then we process all the filets in the AC at home for final freezing.

We happen to have a reverse osmosis water maker in the garage for the reef tank. Additionally, we use it for when we freeze fish in vacuum sealed ziplock freezer bags.
We fill the bags up with just enough water to get the air out of the bottom and bottom corners of the freezer bags. About 1/3 to half of the filets get covered with water. The filets are cut to size so they fit nicely laying down in the whole bottom of the gallon sized freezer bag and the bags are never frozen with more meat than would provide for a 5 person meal. If we feed more folks (and we often do), we pull out more bags.
After filling with (ice cold reverse osmosis 0ppm) water, we submerge the bags in an ice water bucket/sink and leave a corner of the ziplock open and above water until all air rises to the top and finds its way out. You have to play with the meat to get alllll the little bubbles out (very important). Then we roll each bag in wax paper or that nice new stretchy reusable saran wrap and freeze.
Better than any other way you can freeze your fish I promise. Have eaten Wahoo, Blackfin, Yellowfin, Snapper, Mahi, all over a year old with results just fine. The tuna will turn darker and you have to trim any and all red meat off before and after freezing. After naturally thawing, you will have to waste some more meat. For other fish, trim all red meat and skin off and you can freeze like this eternally. Trim any subject pieces that somehow saw air, and cook away.

For tuna, we bleed them as they are kicking, then let them cool down naturally for a few minutes before throwing them in an icy salt brine bath.

This is time tested and we have tried everything over 30 years or so....

Last edited by Captain AL; 05-08-2019 at 03:21 AM.
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Old 05-01-2019, 03:33 AM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by N2theblue View Post
I don't know any other way than to use tap water to wash fish off, and have never noticed difference between tap water or well water. I certainly ain't gonna use dirty creek or waterway water
I agree a fish cleaning table is a slimy mess. especially when working on a bunch of mahi. ya got to rinse em off
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Old 05-01-2019, 03:54 AM
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If you have access to clean salt water to use while cleaning fish, that is the way to go. I guess we are lucky in being in an area with very clean water at the dock. Fresh water in contact with the meat of saltwater fish really does a number on the texture and quality.

When I can't use salt water while filleting one or two fish for dinner (which is usually what I am doing since I will only freeze fish under duress), I cut them at the dock and bring them home "dirty" and then mix up a bowl of salted water at home to rinse off the fillets. This is also really beneficial if you are making sushi from fresh caught tuna.

Try sticking to just salt water rinsing and I think you will be really pleased with the improved texture and appearance of the fillets.

And FWIW, I am not a big fan of dolphin meat either, though handled and cooked properly it is perfectly okay. Just not in my top five favorite fish to eat -- which to start another pissing match in my case would be yellowfin tuna, bluefin tuna, wahoo, black sea bass, and tautog.
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Old 05-01-2019, 05:00 AM
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I don't know what is wrong with y'all's tap water but I have NEVER had fish fillets turn into mushy messes when using it to rinse off fish. And considering the concentrations in typical tap water are on the order of 4 parts per million, I remain very skeptical it has any noticeable effect.
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Old 05-01-2019, 05:51 AM
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Originally Posted by BayHouse View Post
Did you ask what fish is free from "microscopic parasites"?
if the meat is firm, like 98% of the dolphin we catch, then it is free of parasites. the microscopic variety is the only kind to live in dolphin.

i asked Don this because i was helping clean fish one day at a charity event. i had this big dude next to me cleaning fish, and when he got to some dolphin, he stripped the skin off, and told the clueless anglers that the muscle filaments were worms. then he dropped the filet in his cooler.....
i grabbed a dolphin, and started cleaning it, and asked the anglers if they wanted to grill their dolphin, i could leave the skin on. i thought the big dude was going to throw me off the dock.
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Old 05-01-2019, 05:53 AM
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Originally Posted by marsh wabbit View Post
if the meat is firm, like 98% of the dolphin we catch, then it is free of parasites. the microscopic variety is the only kind to live in dolphin.

i asked Don this because i was helping clean fish one day at a charity event. i had this big dude next to me cleaning fish, and when he got to some dolphin, he stripped the skin off, and told the clueless anglers that the muscle filaments were worms. then he dropped the filet in his cooler.....
i grabbed a dolphin, and started cleaning it, and asked the anglers if they wanted to grill their dolphin, i could leave the skin on. i thought the big dude was going to throw me off the dock.
That dude is a shithead.
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Old 05-01-2019, 05:58 AM
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As far as cleaning fish goes, and this works for any saltwater fish:

Get a half bucket of fresh, clean ocean saltwater and put a lid on it. When you get ready to clean the fish, fill that bucket with ice. After cutting the fillets off the fish, you can rinse the fillets in that saltwater brine you made in the bucket. Keeps them firm and cleans them really well, while not ruining any of the meat. I had a chef teach me that trick, he said that rinsing fillets off with freshwater or a hose is about the worst thing you can do to a fresh fish fillet. Obviously you can use the hose to rinse off the table between fish. (Not all fresh water is bad when rinsing fish, I think it really depends on the area you are in. But I have had fish start to get a little mushy when I used to clean snapper with fresh water. After I started using the saltwater method, I never had a fish get "mushy".)

If you want to get real picky, bleed every fish you plan on keeping as the fillets will taste better, even on fish that traditionally don't need to be bled. I've done it on snapper and the fillets come out pure white. I even have a friend that keeps bait in a separate cooler from the fish he plans on eating. That "fishy" taste you get sometimes mostly comes from the blood leftover in the fillets, or from a small blood line left in the fillet.

The fish cooler that you keep the fish in, make sure you have a ton of ice in there, and not just big blocks. Pour a little saltwater in, or sprinkle kosher salt on top. This will reduce the freezing temperature of the brine. When a fish is placed into freezing ice water, as a survival mechanism, the blood is immediately pulled from the muscles into the necessary things like the brain and heart. Do this in conjunction with a bled out fish and you will have the cleanest, blood-free fillets ever.

Another tip is to make sure the fillet table you're using is clean. Seems kinda obvious but a lot of people don't bother to do a quick scrub and rinse, especially on public tables.

Some chefs even make sure that the fillets never touch the fillet table. They will cut the fillet off, and then cut the skin off, and then place the fillet back onto the skin and trim any pieces off while the fillet is on top of the skin, so that it never comes in contact with the table. Not sure if this helps but I've seen some chefs and picky captains do this before.
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Old 05-01-2019, 06:07 AM
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Originally Posted by clarkefishing View Post
As far as cleaning fish goes, and this works for any saltwater fish:

Get a half bucket of fresh, clean ocean saltwater and put a lid on it.
Yep, I'm gonna run a couple miles into a rough ocean after catching a few flounder in the creeks and waterway just for some clean ocean water


Maybe I just have a poor palate, but I've cleaned thousands of fish over the years, on piers/land/boat with treated water, well water, salt water whatever and have never noticed a bit of difference between any of them whether grilled, deep fried, pan sautéed, sashimi, seared, whatever.

Also the chef taking so much care after how that fish probably got treated at the fish market or by commercial fishermen before it got to him is hilarious to me.

Last edited by N2theblue; 05-01-2019 at 06:20 AM.
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