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2 divers die in Eagles Nest cave in Florida.

Old 10-18-2016, 09:43 AM
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Default 2 divers die in Eagles Nest cave in Florida.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...lex-caves.html

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/br...017-story.html

Link to story:


That sign on that link tells it all...but still very sad.



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Old 10-18-2016, 09:46 AM
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Old 10-18-2016, 09:46 AM
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I dive, but no thanks on caves
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Old 10-18-2016, 09:48 AM
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Originally Posted by bluffman2 View Post
I dive, but no thanks on caves
Same here. I know my limits.
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Old 10-18-2016, 09:50 AM
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Saw this yesterday. Found at 260'.

Just stupid.
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Old 10-18-2016, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by bluffman2 View Post
I dive, but no thanks on caves
I don't dive so I don't know anything about it. There are a few things that come to mind on why going in to a cave is a bad idea but can you highlight some points?
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Old 10-18-2016, 09:52 AM
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for 1 im claustrophobic
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Old 10-18-2016, 09:57 AM
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Originally Posted by agallant80 View Post
I don't dive so I don't know anything about it. There are a few things that come to mind on why going in to a cave is a bad idea but can you highlight some points?
It's very easy to get turned around and then have no idea which way is out for one.
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Old 10-18-2016, 10:05 AM
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the article seems a bit off base. If both guys are certified cave divers and had the correct equipment, then sometimes things just go wrong and accidents happen.

it does not seem like the two guys, on whim, jumped into the cave with a regular bc and tank and were screwing around.

the signs are there to prevent those not in know or properly trained to go too far into the cave.
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Old 10-18-2016, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by gtrfred View Post
the article seems a bit off base. If both guys are certified cave divers and had the correct equipment, then sometimes things just go wrong and accidents happen.

it does not seem like the two guys, on whim, jumped into the cave with a regular bc and tank and were screwing around.

the signs are there to prevent those not in know or properly trained to go too far into the cave.
Im thinking narcosis
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Old 10-18-2016, 10:13 AM
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I think the number one reason would have to be a diver can not do an emergency accent.

With cave diving or wreck diving it would be easy to be several hundred feet in but only 30 ft deep. On an emergency accent 30 ft is nothing, but it's that several hundred feet that is going to kill you.

Getting lost is definitely another biggy, but so is that damn current some caves can throw at you.
What happens to a diver if their flashlight gives up the ghost?
Another biggy is far to many divers think they they do not have to adhere to the buddy system. When one diver goes astray both divers will probably die.

PANIC = YOUR DEAD....there just is no second chances when the surface is not above you.
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Old 10-18-2016, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by gtrfred View Post
the signs are there to prevent those not in know or properly trained to go too far into the cave.
I have seen far to many divers that just don't give a shit about a bleepin sign and will go anyways. Machos and egos are killers.
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Old 10-18-2016, 10:32 AM
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How many Certified cave divers do we have on this site?

The training is intense, and requires a lot of equipment $$$. My guess it is similar to flying risk comes with getting too complacent.

I think that is about 5 certified cave divers we have lost this year.

Doug

NSS Certified.

http://caves.org/
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Old 10-18-2016, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by rdmallory View Post
How many Certified cave divers do we have on this site?

The training is intense, and requires a lot of equipment $$$. My guess it is similar to flying risk comes with getting too complacent.

I think that is about 5 certified cave divers we have lost this year.

Doug

NSS Certified.

http://caves.org/
I'm a triple redundancy diver including ice and wreck. I've always known and appreciated my limits.

I'm not convinced complacency is the number one cause, I think egos, acting macho and just plain old being stupid is above complacency.
edit: ....and I'm not really sure where plain old bad luck comes into play, but it's got to be up there as well.

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Old 10-18-2016, 10:56 AM
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I have seen cave divers diving Ginnie Springs in FL they look like they dressed to go in outerspace. Equipment hanging all over them.
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Old 10-18-2016, 11:02 AM
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I would think a line leading the way back out would be important to any that enter a cave.
Going too deep for too long and the line would not help
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Old 10-18-2016, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by agallant80 View Post
I don't dive so I don't know anything about it. There are a few things that come to mind on why going in to a cave is a bad idea but can you highlight some points?
I'm with the others. I love diving, but am not at all attracted to cave diving. I much prefer saltwater diving over fresh, and have dove in freshwater systems that lead to caves and caverns. For me, dive gets boring after a while. Just not as much cool stuff to see as in saltwater.

Tragic incident, and I feel for the families during this time.

To answer your questions a bit. Cave diving is considered diving in an overhead environment. There are others, but cave is generally the most extreme, with wreck penetration following closely behind. Diving in an overhead environment is diving where a straight path to the surface is not possible, either due to a physical barrier, or to a decompression obligation. In a lot of cave systems you have both. Depths and times require deco, plus there's the physical barrier.

To make it even more dangerous, caves often have lots of restrictions and pathways. The restrictions can require the diver to remove their gear to fit through. Lots of pathways mean you can easily get lost if you lose contact with your line.

An errant fin kick can lead to a siltout making it impossible to see anything. This is why cave training includes blackout drills and the scissor kick is not the kick of choice.

A diver entering into a cave environment requires specialized equipment, and lots of it. Due to the tight nature, a buddy may not be able to render aid, so the cave diver needs to be self-sufficient. In the event of a regulator failure, they need a backup. That's not just an octo second stage, but a completely redundant 1st & 2nd stage reg.

Gear needed is extensive. In addition to the reg, a cave diver needs to take with them more air than is needed. For deep cave penetrations, it is not uncommon for a diver to take 4 or more tanks with them. Usually two on back (or side-mount), along with other bottles, either carried (slung) with the diver, or staged at certain points. These usually contain a different gas used for deco during ascent. Using the wrong gas at the wrong time can lead to death as oxygen is toxic at certain partial pressures.

There are all sorts of things that can go wrong during a cave dive, and I don't feel the draw to the caves, so I'll stick to open water and some light wreck penetration.
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Old 10-18-2016, 11:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Offshoreaddicted View Post
I have seen cave divers diving Ginnie Springs in FL they look like they dressed to go in outerspace. Equipment hanging all over them.
Everything is triple as a starting point and then you add from there. The most tanks I've dove with are two 120's filled to 4,200 psi on my back and four 80's filled to 4,100 lbs (two under each arm) and a 24 cu. ft. pony strapped to my chest.
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Old 10-18-2016, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by 99yam40 View Post
I would think a line leading the way back out would be important to any that enter a cave.
Going too deep for too long and the line would not help
I make my own cave diving line reels. I've got a bunch more in my dive bag.
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Old 10-18-2016, 11:16 AM
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To answer your questions a bit. Cave diving is considered diving in an overhead environment. There are others, but cave is generally the most extreme, with wreck penetration following closely behind. Diving in an overhead environment is diving where a straight path to the surface is not possible, either due to a physical barrier, or to a decompression obligation. In a lot of cave systems you have both. Depths and times require deco, plus there's the physical barrier.

To make it even more dangerous, caves often have lots of restrictions and pathways. The restrictions can require the diver to remove their gear to fit through. Lots of pathways mean you can easily get lost if you lose contact with your line.

An errant fin kick can lead to a siltout making it impossible to see anything. This is why cave training includes blackout drills and the scissor kick is not the kick of choice.

A diver entering into a cave environment requires specialized equipment, and lots of it. Due to the tight nature, a buddy may not be able to render aid, so the cave diver needs to be self-sufficient. In the event of a regulator failure, they need a backup. That's not just an octo second stage, but a completely redundant 1st & 2nd stage reg.

Gear needed is extensive. In addition to the reg, a cave diver needs to take with them more air than is needed. For deep cave penetrations, it is not uncommon for a diver to take 4 or more tanks with them. Usually two on back (or side-mount), along with other bottles, either carried (slung) with the diver, or staged at certain points. These usually contain a different gas used for deco during ascent. Using the wrong gas at the wrong time can lead to death as oxygen is toxic at certain partial pressures.

There are all sorts of things that can go wrong during a cave dive, and I don't feel the draw to the caves, so I'll stick to open water and some light wreck penetration.

whew, all that sounds intense. I don't dive but surely respect the ones that do. May they rest in peace
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