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Considering Rec Lobstering

Old 01-09-2019, 08:19 AM
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Default Considering Rec Lobstering

Hi all,
Im considering getting a few traps for the 2019 season. I have a 23' CC and i frequently launch out of Scituate MA.
Im hoping some if you can provide me with some insore about what to expect through the season.
my questions are when to the lobsters show up inshore and when could i expect to start catching?
How much difficulty should i expect with commercial guys and or rec boaters running over gear?
What should i expect to catch with 5-10 traps? Im not looking to change my diet to lobster but wondering if this is worth the work.
Anything else im missing?
Thanks in advance
jim
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Old 01-09-2019, 08:20 AM
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Keep your pots off my numbers, pal
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Old 01-09-2019, 08:48 AM
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Hey JT fish, by the time your boat is out there in the spring there will be lobsters to catch. I would plan on losing a trap or two but it'll probably be to the weather/ a prop vs someone messing with your gear. No intelligent commercial guy is going to risk his lively hood over your single trap, so provided you are not setting on top of him you should be fine. I had 5 traps and there were times where I ate lobster for lunch AND dinner. I gave it away to friends and family until they finally had enough as well. I got invited to lots of BBQ's because I'd always show up with a dozen lobsters. Enjoy!
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:50 AM
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I run 3-5 pots in Boston Harbor, and have had decent success. I bait them with macs/pogies/bluefish frames, and soak them for three or four days between hauls. Usually get at least a few keepers on each haul (you'll also catch all sorts of crabs, flounder, skates, etc.). As DirtyMike said, you'll likely end up with more lobster than you know what to do with at some point.

Finding a productive fishing locations is all about trial and error, but I've had good luck with mud bottom in the spring, and then moving to rocky bottom when the water warms up.

And be prepared to get the boat messy, especially once the pots have been in for a few months.
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by gfdriscoll View Post
Keep your pots off my numbers, pal
Gerard I’m going to put a string on the SW corner for you!
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Old 01-09-2019, 10:27 AM
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I found it to be an expensive hobby but worth the excitement with my son, never know whats in the next trap. With a new boat there's no way I am hauling pots, very messy. The major expense for me was bait, I ended up buying most of it because I always just hit them on my way out to fish and didn't want to deal with them on way in (always running late on way in from fishing). I will say as far as a tip just buy some used gear (start with 4) and only put out as much line as needed for max high tide. This will limit the risk of tangling with others and loosing your gear. Lastly figure out how your going to store them. Unless you want to eat one at a time you will need a way to stockpile them. I trailer so that was an obstacle. Good luck.
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Old 01-09-2019, 10:35 AM
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We did it for years on the North Shore of Long Island. The biggest problem we had was the commercial guys. They expected us to set our pots no closer than 100 miles from theirs. We stayed clear of them as a courtesy, but too often it apparently wasn’t far enough. After all, they do own the ocean. Be prepared to replace a few every now and then.
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Old 01-09-2019, 11:13 AM
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I did it in south of boston harbor this year. I started with 4 traps, only have 1 left. I learned quick not to put them near where any boat traffic would be. Sure does make a mess of the boat I couldn't imagine not having a swim platform to bring them up on. I think ill only run 1 next year just for fun
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Old 01-09-2019, 07:38 PM
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It's messy and feeding 10 traps can be a pain in the arse but I think it's worth it. I have a line hauler which makes it a hell of a lot less work.
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Old 01-10-2019, 08:02 AM
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I did 10 pots for a long time (actually we technically had 20 because my dad had 10 too)

By the time you factor in the cost of traps, bait, fuel and time you are going to come out behind vs. just buying a few lobsters when you want them down at the dock off one of the commercial guys.


BUT - I loved it and think you should do it... You will undoubtedly lose some traps over the years and some will get damaged. Put them in close to the rocks where the big commercial boats dont want to (but not so close they will get destroyed)

Another thing to consider is that its very messy so if you are a "clean boat" guy you will scratch your deck, get seaweed and all types of growth everywhere, and likely bang up the hullsides (I used to keep a large section of roofing rubber on boat for this. Again, for me it was worth it. I only stopped when i got a bigger boat that I didnt want to mess up.
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Old 01-10-2019, 08:04 AM
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Build a LYS16 then you can rake clams and lobster with impunity.
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Old 01-10-2019, 10:06 AM
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When the lines been in the water for a long time it gets razor sharp with barnacles. Wear gloves. Bait and location are key as is rope length. I've had luck with bonito, bluefish, pogy racks. And bad luck with seabass,tog,scup racks but it could have been my location
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Old 01-11-2019, 12:28 PM
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Appreciate the info guys. ill keep you posted on how i make out!
Thanks
Jim
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Old 01-12-2019, 06:26 AM
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Ive done it on and off for 20 years (rec and commercially). Its a lot of work, by the time you get out, snag some bait, pull 5 traps, bait them, get back, clean the boat its a couple hours. I do it mainly with the kids now other wise I wouldn't even bother. I've had my best luck with scup and bluefish racks.

As far as losing traps, I've lost a few but I've had more trouble with guys just taking lobsters out of it.
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Old 01-13-2019, 07:50 AM
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I had 4-5 traps out of scituate for about 4 years. Key is to bait/check often which became a problem for me. Was great when kids were into it, but became more work than its worth. Commercial guys go parallel to beach, I was very careful not to set on them, but sometimes made costly mistakes. There are so many out there it can be difficult. If you have time and interest it can be very productive.
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Old 01-13-2019, 11:16 AM
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Can be fun and productive, but as mentioned it can be messy and time consuming. If you are planning on baiting and checking once a week don't expect many. Could neve figure it it poaching or they just figure out how to get out of the trap.
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Old 01-13-2019, 01:05 PM
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I got into it last season and had a great time and a great season, lots of lobsters!

I ran 5 -36" traps and bought one keeper trap to store them in when I wanted to save them up for a cookout or something.....but be sure to still band them (I double banned them) when putting them in the keeper trap so they dont fight and claw each other to death.

I went with new gear, it wasnt much more than beat up used gear for sale online. New England Marine and Industrial in Portsmouth NH set me up with everything I needed, they sell complete package setups (but upgrade the rope to 3/8" pot warp sinking rope), bouys, trap repair parts, banding gear and tools, etc. I think I spent about $580 for everything.. traps, rope, keeper trap, bands, tools, repair parts, bouys, special bouy paint, etc. New England Marine was great, I just told them I was a greenhorn newbie and to set me up with what I needed.

Its great to pull the traps after a days fishing and bring home some lobsters, I never seemed to get skunked.

Like others said, its very messy, especially early season with the sea lice.....but all worth it. If your concerned buy a decent tarp for the deck, and I used a big rubber welcome Mat from home depot on the gunwale to protect it. Also, I highly recomend the protective plastic corners they sell for the traps to protect your boat....especially if someone not familiar pulling traps is hauling them. I found a website that sold a manual Davitt that fit into my rod holder, it was well worth it and made for easy work hauling the traps.

Most of all have fun!
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Old 01-13-2019, 06:25 PM
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Originally Posted by liquid plumber View Post
I got into it last season and had a great time and a great season, lots of lobsters!
Most of all have fun!
Mind detailing your choices? Are there any clear choices for trap types? What did you get for a puller?
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Old 01-14-2019, 10:57 AM
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I'll second New England Marine and Industrial for lobster trap setups. I bought a few at their Marshfield location last year. They are very good quality, not the shit that is listed on CL.
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Old 01-14-2019, 04:24 PM
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https://www.discoverybaymarinegear.com/cgi-bin/qu

here is the manual lobster pot davitt puller i bought....i went with the standard 80 stainless model. I just modified it and notched the bottom of the davitt pole to go into my rod holder and click in like the butt end of a rod.

As far as traps, i went with the 36" trap from new England Marine, excellent quality traps.
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