The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum

Go Back   >
Search


Like Tree1Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-06-2017, 09:57 AM   #1
Admirals Club
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: LI,NY
Posts: 805
Default Anchor purchase question

I do most of my anchoring in the great south bay on LI, NY. Its mostly a sandy bottom. The new boat I purchased will have a windlass. I like the look of a delta however i have only used danforths/fluke. Do any of you guys use a delta on the south shore of LI?
gina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2017, 11:18 AM   #2
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: NE
Posts: 297
Default

No matter what anchor you get proper setup is essential. Have enough chain and rode length for what conditions and depth you plan to anchor in. Anchoring is not an exact science but there are plenty of guidelines to follow, you can find that on Google. You will have to decide if you want all chain or chain and rope. Pros and cons for each. If you boat is on the cusp between anchor sizes go with the larger. Use the largest size chain that will fit through the windless.

Cheap fluke style anchors tend to bend the flukes up if they get hung up in rocks.

Im not in LI, area, Personally I have a plow anchor for my fishing drop anchor, oversized and 20ft of chain 600 ft of rope. If your not anchoring overnight offshore 300ft rope might be enough. I haven't dragged of my spot since I went to this. For overnighting in protected areas you may not need to go overboard, but don't skimp on the chain. Did I mention to make sure you have plenty of chain on your set up if you use rope as rode??

Rob

BTW use plenty of chain.
xr616 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2017, 11:45 AM   #3
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Stamford, CT
Posts: 2,226
Default

Kirk,

What did you do with the Contender? What did you get?
Scott1115 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2017, 12:45 PM   #4
Admirals Club
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: LI,NY
Posts: 805
Default

Scott, traded it in for a new 31t cape horn. Boat build will start in January. Excited is an understatement.
Scott1115 likes this.
gina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2017, 12:55 PM   #5
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: East Hampton Ct
Posts: 3,073
Default

We have a 20# Delta on 35ft of chain and 250' of 8 plaight 5/8 nylon for our 34C. We primarily anchor in Napatree and Block with no problems.
KeithS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2017, 01:12 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 2,279
Default

Kirk,

I had a 17lb Delta Stainless on my old boat, the 24 Holby with a Windlass. Great to look at on the bow but didn't love it for our local bottom.

My Everglades is a different boat altogether and I have a Fortress.
Avid 24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2017, 01:28 PM   #7
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Stamford, CT
Posts: 2,226
Default

Quote:
Scott, traded it in for a new 31t cape horn. Boat build will start in January. Excited is an understatement.
I wanted that boat so bad when you had it for sale prior to the repower but timing was piss-poor for me.
Scott1115 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2017, 01:29 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 150
Default

From WM

What are the typical bottom conditions?


Anchors need to develop enough resistance in the seabed to withstand the environmental forces on the boat - the wind and the waves. An anchor’s ability to develop resistance is entirely dependent on its ability to engage and penetrate the seabed. In all of our anchor tests, there always seems to be one undeniable conclusion: the selection of a suitable bottom for anchoring is a much more critical factor than the design of the anchor. So how do you choose the right anchor design? You must take expected bottom conditions into account. Here are some potential options, based on the seabed:


Sand: fine-grained sand is relatively easy for anchors to penetrate and offers consistently high holding power and repeatable results. Most anchors will hold the greatest tension in hard sand. Pivoting-fluke anchors and non-hinged scoop anchors are the best types in sand. The Rocna performed excellently in our anchor tests in sand.

The Fortress, an aluminum-magnesium Danforth-style, has shown incredible holding power in our 2006 anchor tests, with the 21lb. FX37 sustaining over 5,000lb. of load.

Mud: mud has low shear strength, and requires anchor designs with a broader shank-fluke angle and greater fluke area. This allows the anchor to penetrate deeply to where the mud has greater sheer strength. Mud is frequently only a thin layer over some other material, so anchors that can penetrate through the mud to the underlying material will hold more. Fortress anchors have greater holding power in mud because they can be adjusted from their standard 32° to a broad 45° fluke angle.

Rock and coral: holding power is most dependent on where you happen to drop the hook, rather than the type of anchor. Plow-shaped or grapnel-type anchors, with high structural strength to sustain the high point-loads, generally work the best. These anchors include the Claw, CQR, Delta, Rocna and Supreme.

Shale, clay and grassy bottoms: tough bottoms for all anchor designs, with the weight of the anchor, more than the design the most important factor in penetration and holding power. CQR, Delta, Rocna and Supreme anchors are thought to be good due to their ability to penetrate vegetation. However, these conditions have a high probability of false setting, due to the anchor catching on roots and protrusions, rather than something solid.
tonyc69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2017, 01:41 PM   #9
Admirals Club
THT sponsor
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Based in Cape Coral Florida, USA
Posts: 48
Default

Hi Gina, Take a look at our TPX anchors on our web site: www.anchorlift.com We have some testing results and comparison guides for reference. You can also call me directly to discuss.

Thanks
TheWindlassGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2017, 01:42 PM   #10
Admirals Club
THT sponsor
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Based in Cape Coral Florida, USA
Posts: 48
Default

Hi Gina, Take a look at our TPX anchors on our web site: anchorlift.com We have some testing results and comparison guides for reference. You can also call me directly to discuss.

Thanks
TheWindlassGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2017, 10:01 AM   #11
drd
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: CT
Posts: 182
Default

I have had deltas on my last 2 boats. They have worked great with both boats. If using it with a windless just check the windless specs for chain and rode size.
drd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2017, 04:15 PM   #12
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: CT
Posts: 260
Default

We have a 20lb delta, 30 ft of chain, 200 feet of 1/2 line. We anchor all over Connecticut, north shore of long island, and block island with no issue. I personally I like the anchor, sets quick and will continuously dig deeper into the ground. Like stated above, it is all about your anchor rode set up( chain, line and anchor).
Forrest Gump is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2017, 10:49 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 584
Default

I did some research for a purchase last year and what I found is that the newer style anchors generally perform better.

Rocna
Manson Supreme
Mantus

I purchased a Mantus anchor and am very satisfied with the performance. I switched to an all Chain rode this year for extra security.
kevincook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2017, 08:35 PM   #14
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 435
Default

Be careful here,a lot of these Post are from boaters who anchor in deep rocky fast moving water. In the GSB your rarely in water over 15 ft and it’s mostly sand.A good fluke anchor with 6 to ten ft of chain and 100 ft of 3/8 anchor line should do it.
getthenetmontauk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2017, 05:25 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 655
Default

My horrible experience with Delta anchors, a 55 and an 88# is they both plowed. OK, someone else’s experience may be different. My 55 is sold and I still have the 88 in like new condition where it will remain in my basement. OH, I use an all chain rode for those who may suggest using chain.
foggysail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2017, 08:26 PM   #16
Admirals Club
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Sharon, Ma.
Posts: 1,756
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by foggysail View Post
My horrible experience with Delta anchors, a 55 and an 88# is they both plowed. OK, someone else’s experience may be different. My 55 is sold and I still have the 88 in like new condition where it will remain in my basement. OH, I use an all chain rode for those who may suggest using chain.
How big is your boat?
South of Heaven is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 10:28 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 655
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by South of Heaven View Post
How big is your boat?
I have a 40’ Silverton aftcabin with a huge windlass. My boat size surely impacts the anchor load but it is very important that my anchor be reliable especially if I want to sleep at night. Currently l have an 80# Manson Supreme and even that has a couple of times been unreliable especially with a wind change and if the anchor is caked with mud. I also have a huge Fortress that is still in the shipping box unopened for a backup if needed.

I highly recommend most of the modern anchors over the older styles. So if your intention is to sleep on your boat, be careful making your choice for an anchor. OH— to further complicate things, consider how crowded our harbors are today. The idea of using a scope of 10 today is ludicrous.
foggysail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 07:15 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: NY
Posts: 364
Default

If your backup is literally unopened, I would at least take a look at it before it is quickly needed.
jvitiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2017, 09:11 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 584
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by foggysail View Post
......a wind change and if the anchor is caked with mud. .......

.
This is exactly why I selected the Mantus Anchor. This guy on Youtube has tested a lot of anchors.



I know the bottom conditions make a big difference but it is hard to get good data for all conditions.

Fortress has a good series of anchor testing. Here is one of the videos in that series, particularly the small FX-16 anchor.


kevincook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2017, 04:09 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 159
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kevincook View Post
This is exactly why I selected the Mantus Anchor.
X3 on the Mantus.... works great on the South Shore of Long Island!
kilodelta75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:08 PM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
©2009 TheHullTruth.com

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.9.3.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.