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Fluke sashimi

Old 05-12-2015, 07:48 PM
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Default Fluke sashimi

OK, odd question, but is the fluke that sushi restaurants offer, the same as the fluke that we catch in NJ (summer flounder)? has anyone eaten this raw? When I eat it at the restaurant, it seems like a firmer texture that what I know from filleting local fluke growing up - but just wondering if anyone knows?
Old 05-12-2015, 08:02 PM
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I have always assumed that it is from local waters as I see it more in NJ than other place. I order it often - more for the novelty - but honestly think it's one of those fish better cooked than raw (this is from a guy that will only eat raw Salmon, go figure).
Old 05-12-2015, 08:50 PM
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it's delicious raw. I used to fish it commercially in the 90's. You had to bleed it and ice it right away. All the fluke were exported to Japan back then. Fresh fluke raw is hard to beat. Hirame is the name if you order it. Sometimes american sushi places try to get away serving halibut or other species as Hirame.
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Old 05-13-2015, 06:36 AM
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Second what big shrimpin said. You need to let the fish 'age' for 1-3 days in the fridge in order for the fillets to firm up like you would expect in a sushi restaurant. Also, wrap them in paper towels & plastic wrap and store in zip lock bags.
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Old 05-13-2015, 06:45 AM
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I have had it and enjoy it. Zero idea where it comes from though.

Poor fish though...they pulled it from the tank.

Put it on a piece of wood that had two nails in the front, pushed its head on the nails to keep it steady, skinned it, cut the sashimi from it and served it.
Old 05-13-2015, 07:13 AM
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Esuomm1, you prepare lobster sashimi in a similar fashion. A live lobster is placed on a platter and the tail meat exposed in it's shell. The live lobster is served to the table and you pick at the tailmeat. I've only seen it afar from another table. The poor lobsters antennae still moving around. I'm not a fan of that type of "cuisine".

Those that have tried fluke sashimi, what other fish does it compare to, if any? I'm a huge fan of red snapper sashimi, along with the regulars: tuna, salmon, etc...
Old 05-13-2015, 10:30 AM
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Rusty,
Fluke has a distinct aroma. It's quite difficult to compare with other fish but snapper is probably close.
And, the ribbon (side meat) is the delicacy part. It is crunchy and a bit fatty.

As for Lobster sashimi, My chef friend suggested me to rinse the tail meat with ice cold mix of sake/water for 15 seconds. This makes the meat bit firmer and tastier (Called "Arai" in Japanese).
Old 05-13-2015, 10:32 AM
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Here are some pics of sashimi I made (fluke, lobster, porgy and seabass)
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:34 AM
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Fluke
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:43 AM
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Porgy and seabass
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:43 AM
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Blackfish
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:48 AM
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False albacore
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Old 05-13-2015, 11:03 AM
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Thanks all for the informative replies - great stuff. Has anyone tried any other NJ species (weakfish, bluefish).

what is the method that I should use for "bleeding"? Can anyone describe it in detail? thanks.
Old 05-13-2015, 11:58 AM
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Great pics Rinoue! Please tell me those are from a restaurant in NJ. My fav sushi place went downhill over the past coupla years.

I'd also like to learn about the bleeding process. What about fileting at sea?
Old 05-13-2015, 12:25 PM
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You guys are making me hungry!
Old 05-13-2015, 04:49 PM
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I do make these.....it's quite difficult to find a good sushi restaurant nowadays.

To bleed to fish, cut a gill and leave it in a bucket for about 10 mins. Then, keep it in the cooler box with ice and SALT water.

Also, don't fillet the fish until you eat. Once you fillet it, the meat starts losing its fluid and lose the flavor (never store sliced fish more that 1hr!). I usually remove the head, scale, and clean the inside, then wrap it with a kitchen paper and plastic wrap.

As for knives, you don't need a Japanese sashimi knife. I sometime use it but I'm lazy to sharpen every time...my favorite is Global knife (stainless steel, I think 12 in). It keeps the sharpness long time and easy to clean.

Oh, This is important the the taste change as it gets aged. I keep the fish in the fridge(head, gut, scale removed) for several days. My general aging days are
Porgy/False Albacore/Mackerel/Triggerfish: 1-3 days
Fluke/Sea Bass/Striped Bass: 2-7 days
Blackfish: 3-10 days
Tuna: 4-9 days
Cod: no sashimi due to parasite issue
Of course, you can start eating them right away but you pretty much enjoy the texture rather than the sweetness/taste. I recommend everyone to eat several days to taste the difference.

Oh, here is my blackfish sashimi (sugata zukuri style: whole fish). Mine doesn't move while I eat

Hope this helps

Reo
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Old 05-13-2015, 05:12 PM
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Originally Posted by rusty spoke View Post
Great pics Rinoue! Please tell me those are from a restaurant in NJ. My fav sushi place went downhill over the past coupla years.

I'd also like to learn about the bleeding process. What about fileting at sea?
On the belly side lift the gill and slice the membrane . . . Then where the body narrows just above the tail next to the spine stick with a knife blade and twist.

When you hold the fish belly side up and head is pointed toward you (tail pointed away from you) poke a hole just to the left side of the spine and twist. You'll know you hit the spot when blood pours out. Let the fish bleed out in water for 3 - 5 minutes and then put in a saltwater ice slurry belly up. It sounds a bit cruel, but they go quick this way. The meat is delicious.

Don't fillet at sea . . . I don't think regs allow it and it's not clean enough if you are going to eat it raw.
Old 05-14-2015, 04:59 AM
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Again, great feedback. Thanks so much. This is the easy part....now I have to go out and catch all these fish.
Old 05-14-2015, 11:07 AM
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Erik,
I tried Sea Robin, Weakfish, Bluefish, Stargazer, Herring, and Squid so far.

Sea Robin: It is pretty good. I bring it home time to time but only large ones. Similar taste to Fluke but little softer.
Weakfish: Not bad but meat has no fat.
Bluefish: I regretted it. Meat is too soft and strong flavor.
Stargazer: Very firm meat. Taste similar to Fugu (Puffer Fish), it's a delicacy.
Herring: Nice sweet meat but too much bone. I had to slice it so thin, or marinate in a vinegar for a few hours.
Squid: My favorite all the time. I used to drive to Newport, RI from NJ just for squid fishing in May.
Old 05-14-2015, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by rinoue View Post
Erik,
I tried Sea Robin, Weakfish, Bluefish, Stargazer, Herring, and Squid so far.

Sea Robin: It is pretty good. I bring it home time to time but only large ones. Similar taste to Fluke but little softer.
Weakfish: Not bad but meat has no fat.
Bluefish: I regretted it. Meat is too soft and strong flavor.
Stargazer: Very firm meat. Taste similar to Fugu (Puffer Fish), it's a delicacy.
Herring: Nice sweet meat but too much bone. I had to slice it so thin, or marinate in a vinegar for a few hours.
Squid: My favorite all the time. I used to drive to Newport, RI from NJ just for squid fishing in May.
Damn bro... you are a brave man.

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