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Boat capsized

Old 11-15-2020, 07:38 AM
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Default Boat capsized

Anyone know what happened in raritan bay yesterday ? I wasnt out but didnt seem real windy ..... RIP
Old 11-15-2020, 08:01 AM
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It was def sloppy around the hook later in the day. Didn't hear anything though.
Old 11-15-2020, 08:25 AM
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https://www.shorenewsnetwork.com/202...n-raritan-bay/
Old 11-15-2020, 09:48 AM
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That's terrible. It was definitely breezy yesterday afternoon in LI Sound -- a good 15-20. This is a tricky time of the year to be boating solo. Wear a PFD and be extra careful.
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Old 11-15-2020, 02:47 PM
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Good reason to be out in ocean water at any time in a much bigger boat. People don’t get it until it is too late. The family must feel terrible. No need for these situations.

And a life jacket will not do much good in cold water conditions that we are now beginning to experience.
Old 11-15-2020, 06:30 PM
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Originally Posted by foggysail View Post
And a life jacket will not do much good in cold water conditions that we are now beginning to experience.
The Coast Guard disagrees with this statement. Cold Water Survival

The Cold Facts:
  • Be aware that cold water (less than 70 degrees F (21 Degrees C)) can lower your body temperature. This is called hypothermia. If your body temperature goes too low, you may pass out and then drown. Even if you're wearing a PFD, your body can cool down 25 times faster in cold water than in air.
  • Water temperature, body size, amount of body fat, and movement in the water all play a part in cold water survival. Small people cool faster than large people. Children cool faster than adults.
  • But PFDs can still help you stay alive longer in cold water. They let you float without using energy and they protect part of your body from cold water. A snug-fitting PFD is better than one that's loose-f itting. When you boat in cold water, use a flotation coat or deck-suit style PFD. In cold water, they're better than vests because they cover more of your body.
  • When you're in cold water, don't swim unless you can reach a nearby boat, fellow survivor, or floating object. Even good swimmers drown while swimming in cold water. Swimming lowers your body temperature.
  • If a nearby floating object is large, pull yourself up on it. The more your body is out of water, the warmer you'll be. Don't use drownproofing methods that call for putting your face in the water. Keep your head out of the water to lessen heat loss and increase survival time.
  • Use of the HELP position will lessen heat loss. However, if you're wearing a Type III PFD, or if the HELP position turns you face down, bring your legs together tight and your arms tight to your sides and your head back. See the SURVIVAL POSITION examples shown below.
  • If there are others in the water, HUDDLE together for warmth. Keep a positive outlook. It will improve your chances of survival.
  • Always wear your PFD. Even if you become helpless from hypothermia, your PFD will keep you afloat.

How hypothermia affects most adults:
Water Temperature in Degrees
F (Degrees C) Exhaustion or Unconsciousness Expected Time of Survival 32.5 (0.3) Under 15 min. Under 15 to 45 min. 32.5 to 40 (0.3 to 4.5) 15 to 30 min. 30 to 90 min. 40 to 50 (4.5 to 10) 30 to 60 min. 1 to 3 hrs. 50 to 60 (10 to 15.5) 1 to 2 hrs. 1 to 6 hrs. 60 to 70 (15.5 to 21) 2 to 7 hrs. 2 to 40 hrs. 70 to 80 (21 to 26.5) 2 to 12 hrs. 3 hrs. to indefinite Over 80 (Over 26.5) Indefinite Indefinite

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Size:  866 Bytes PFDs FOR INFANTs
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Size:  866 Bytes DEFINITIONS
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Old 11-16-2020, 09:00 AM
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It turns out the Good Samaritan was the husband and daughter of a woman who works for me. They were going fishing on a friends boat when they were flagged down by another boat. They went over and saw the other boat. The husband and friend were able to pull the man out of the water and the daughter started CPR.

Very sad situation all around. The daughter is quite upset about it as is to be expected.

Maybe someone here knows the reason, but they said there was no AED on the coast guard boat. Is there a specific reason? Water related? Could the shock go through the person and screw up the boat somehow?
Old 11-16-2020, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Strike1 View Post

Maybe someone here knows the reason, but they said there was no AED on the coast guard boat. Is there a specific reason? Water related? Could the shock go through the person and screw up the boat somehow?
That is surprising if true. AED units can be operated safely aboard a vessel and are critical to CPR success. Coast Guard mandates that all commercial boats including 6-pack charters have CPR certified crew aboard.
Old 11-16-2020, 10:25 AM
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I'm also thinking that in the confusion of the scene if the husband and daughter just didn't see it etc. The CG may have assessed the situation and based on the age of the gentleman that passed, the water temp, time before they got there, etc they may have determined it was not necessary.
Old 11-16-2020, 12:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Napatree View Post
That is surprising if true. AED units can be operated safely aboard a vessel and are critical to CPR success. Coast Guard mandates that all commercial boats including 6-pack charters have CPR certified crew aboard.
I have asked the Coast guard and was given multiple reasons:
1) its against their policy (weak excuse)
2) none of their regular officers are trained to use (current models are super easy to use... they can talk to you...)
3) wet conditions could lead to the person administering and others getting shocked

I think there should be AEDs aboard every single CG boat. I think helos with medics aboard do carry one that can be dropped?

USCG Safe Boating D8 can you please comment?

Fact is AEDs save lives. I helped save one last year on the water.

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