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Where did the inshore lobster traps go??

Old 05-04-2019, 06:54 PM
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Default Where did the inshore lobster traps go??

I'm older than dirt, but I remember I used to have to dodge small floats from lobster traps all over lis and bis. Some were recreational, but most were comm. It was hard to travel at night in a small boat without getting tangled up in them.

Now, nothing.

Are the regs keeping them away or are the lobsters just gone from our waters? I don't even see many deep water high flyers on the way to the canyons, and those I do see I'm told are mostly crab traps (deep water crab are profitable here) talking to the boats.

Not just long island sound. All the way out to the canyons traps are going away. Good structure to target mahi. too bad whatever the reason.......
Old 05-04-2019, 08:42 PM
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LIS became basically a lobster-free zone about 10 years ago, they've actually made a little comeback recently but not too much. One theory is the pesticide they used to kill mosquitoes because of West Nile wiped them out. Whether it's true or not I don't know.

As to the rest of it, things are changing. Species we've never seen have shown up and some we know have moved and/or diminished. The water's gotten warmer , I don't think that's in doubt.

If there were lobsters there somebody would be fishing them.
Old 05-04-2019, 08:51 PM
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Originally Posted by gerg View Post
I'm older than dirt, but I remember I used to have to dodge small floats from lobster traps all over lis and bis. Some were recreational, but most were comm. It was hard to travel at night in a small boat without getting tangled up in them.

Now, nothing.

Are the regs keeping them away or are the lobsters just gone from our waters? I don't even see many deep water high flyers on the way to the canyons, and those I do see I'm told are mostly crab traps (deep water crab are profitable here) talking to the boats.

Not just long island sound. All the way out to the canyons traps are going away. Good structure to target mahi. too bad whatever the reason.......
Bugs are GONE, it’s really sad. I’ve dove shipwrecks in RI & BI Sounds for decades. Used to be by August I was sick of lobster, now hardly ever see a keeper. South of Block Island in the 150’ depth range occasionally come across some decent sized lobos but they’re few and far between. I keep hoping for a comeback but it’s not happening.

I think the pesticide theory is as good as any BUT I would not discount the Black Sea Bass invasion having something to do with it. Perhaps it’s coincidence, but it seems like the more Black Sea Bass I encounter the fewer bugs I see. I would think hordes of Black Sea Bass feasting on baby lobsters can’t be doing much to help the lobster population.....
Old 05-04-2019, 09:15 PM
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The bass have to be a factor at some level I'd think.
Old 05-05-2019, 04:04 AM
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Seabass... I fish south of Nomans around lobster gear. They amount of baby lobsters they puke up really is astonishing.
Old 05-05-2019, 07:46 PM
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I’m a strong believer in the pesticide theory. The timing of the die off right after the spraying.
Old 05-05-2019, 09:30 PM
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I believe the pesticide took out the LIS lobsters and maybe to a smaller degree parts of BIS but not north of there or offshore. As you say, the timing was on the money. And the crash was pretty much instant.
Old 05-06-2019, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by gerg View Post
I'm older than dirt, but I remember I used to have to dodge small floats from lobster traps all over lis and bis. Some were recreational, but most were comm. It was hard to travel at night in a small boat without getting tangled up in them.

Now, nothing.

Are the regs keeping them away or are the lobsters just gone from our waters? I don't even see many deep water high flyers on the way to the canyons, and those I do see I'm told are mostly crab traps (deep water crab are profitable here) talking to the boats.

Not just long island sound. All the way out to the canyons traps are going away. Good structure to target mahi. too bad whatever the reason.......
There are so many traps up in North MA, NH and Southern Maine where I fish I wish there were 75% less. I hate getting big fish on and worrying about lobster gear.
Old 05-06-2019, 11:12 AM
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I am not a big "global warming" nut but there was an article about sea temps and lobster populations a few years back ill see if I can find it...
Old 05-06-2019, 11:17 AM
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the amount of baby bugs i see in the bellies in BSB.... whoa.

BSB are gorging themselves on them. Lobsters dont stand a chance.
Old 05-06-2019, 11:43 AM
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The lobsters voted with their feet on the subject of climate change which isn't happening
Old 05-06-2019, 11:59 AM
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don't quote me on precise #'s and years haven't read the stats in a while. 1995 2 million lbs of lobster harvested from LI sound, 2005 200,000 lbs
Old 05-06-2019, 12:47 PM
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I can see how pollution could have an impact inshore, but even the high flyers are thinning out all the way to the canyons, and a lot of those are crab traps (I didn't realize there was a crab fishery here, but apparently there is).

This seems to be happening way out into the deep water.
Old 05-06-2019, 12:50 PM
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i do recall this from back in the day as well, pretty sure it didn't help anything.

https://www.nytimes.com/1996/01/22/u...y-thought.html
Old 05-06-2019, 01:35 PM
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It's likely a combination of factors.

The lobster shell disease in Long Island Sound was especially bad, and whatever lobster survived were not particularly enticing to eat.
See here: The mystery of lobster shell disease | Deep Sea News

An abundance of black sea bass has hurt the juveniles.
Mosquito pesticide is especially harmful to larval arthropods, which is partly why in the Keys the switched to a mosquito larvecide that only kills mosquito larvae.
And yes, Climate Change is real, the earth is round, vaccines work, and Long Island Sound is absolutely warming to the point that Homarus is no longer using those waters for adult habitat.
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Old 05-06-2019, 02:49 PM
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Originally Posted by burningdaylight View Post
It's likely a combination of factors.

The lobster shell disease in Long Island Sound was especially bad, and whatever lobster survived were not particularly enticing to eat.
See here: The mystery of lobster shell disease | Deep Sea News

An abundance of black sea bass has hurt the juveniles.
Mosquito pesticide is especially harmful to larval arthropods, which is partly why in the Keys the switched to a mosquito larvecide that only kills mosquito larvae.
And yes, Climate Change is real, the earth is round, vaccines work, and Long Island Sound is absolutely warming to the point that Homarus is no longer using those waters for adult habitat.

Spot on!
Old 05-06-2019, 02:53 PM
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When did the BSB population invade BIS and LIS?
Old 05-06-2019, 03:05 PM
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Originally Posted by sammythetuna View Post
When did the BSB population invade BIS and LIS?
i didn't say invasion...

just saying for every BSB i cut open there are 4-8 lobster in its guts. you do the math.
Old 05-06-2019, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by sammythetuna View Post
When did the BSB population invade BIS and LIS?
Been that way for awhile out at the Block.....they're worst then the bluefish, sometimes when eel fishing for bass......
Old 05-07-2019, 04:29 AM
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May 18th. We do this for the baby bugs.
And for the fryer, the grill, and ceviche, but also, now, for the bugs....
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