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Boat Collision Today in the Chesapeake Bay

Old 08-21-2018, 04:09 AM
  #81  
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Originally Posted by gregb5220 View Post
And that, my friends, is why your required to have radar on at ALL times.
Is that a joke? Hope so. Think he has a radar on that cockpit station?
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Old 08-21-2018, 06:03 AM
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11. Am I required to have Radar? Radar is not required on vessels under 1600 GT (33 CFR 164.35), however, Rule 7 states that proper use shall be made of radar equipment if fitted and operational. In other words, whoever has one must use it. The Navigation Rules are not meant to discourage the use of any device, rather they expect prudent mariners to avail themselves of all available means appropriate...as to make full appraisal of the situation (Rule 5), e.g. the use of radar. At issue is whether the use of radar is appropriate in the prevailing circumstances and that is a determination made by the Master; and, ultimately decided by a trier of fact.

Should you be in a collision how would a judge/jury rule on your contention that the use of radar was impracticable (due to electrical drain, crew shortages, etc.)? Also, if a collision does occur, then there was obviously a risk of collision beforehand. Could the determination of that risk have been made sooner with the use of radar? It is difficult to answer such questions because the circumstances of each case are different.

https://www.navcen.uscg.gov/?pageNam...ulesFAQ#0.3_11
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Old 08-21-2018, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by zam View Post
That must be really depressing, get a brand new charter boat, thinking your dream has finally come true, then in an instant its over, he could make a comeback though
If he's able to financially weather this, and assuming he still has a passion to try chartering/guiding, I hope he does come back. Learn from it, impart the lessons learned during boat safety lectures or the like. I don't know how much genuine prep work he did (aside being an avid angler), but maybe take on an experienced mate -- at least at first -- to help learn the ropes and ease distractions. Give it a rest for a bit, think on it and, if the passion and ability remain, start again.
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Old 08-21-2018, 09:57 AM
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This radar feature would have saved millions of $$ worth of damage if simply used by captains....... engage the radar's alert system. You simply define the search area and range. Anytime a target enters that area, an audible alarm is triggered until the Captain manually turns it off. I use it all the time especially on my runs of 1 hour or more.
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Old 08-21-2018, 11:58 AM
  #85  
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Originally Posted by chrisrack View Post
This radar feature would have saved millions of $$ worth of damage if simply used by captains....... engage the radar's alert system. You simply define the search area and range. Anytime a target enters that area, an audible alarm is triggered until the Captain manually turns it off. I use it all the time especially on my runs of 1 hour or more.
Do you run that way in a crowded waterway? Must sound like a beep fest on your boat!
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Old 08-21-2018, 12:13 PM
  #86  
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Originally Posted by Corndog38 View Post
Is that a joke? Hope so. Think he has a radar on that cockpit station?
No its not a joke at all. I could name 10 charter boats in my area that have a second monitor in the back deck. And if he doesn't than that station should be used for docking only and not chasing fish. Pretty simple.
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Old 08-21-2018, 01:11 PM
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That was an interesting read over on the sea ray forum. Had to open a cached copy because the OP deleted it. Of course, nothing is ever really gone on the internet. One of the things he said was "We were underway for about 10 minutes, and I estimate our speed was around 30 knots". He never said where the captain was. Presumably he was at the forward helm. or the poster would have said where he was. He could have fallen asleep though. Long day, up very early, hustled all day, wouldn't be the first cap to z out in a comfy helm chair. Or, he could simply have been distracted at the wrong time. Do cell phones work there?

Monitors visible to the pit are very common up here as well. Though usually they are used for the bottom machine and not radar. It helps mates set the baits.
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Old 08-21-2018, 07:05 PM
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Originally Posted by dsharp View Post
Apparently the dipshits on the east coast don't know how to run a boat. Three collisions and one jetty smck in two weeks, wow.
Without addressing this incident, wasn't that a TEXAS sport fish that T-boned a shrimper while running at speed on A/P with the "captain" in the cockpit measuring and taking photos with a marlin, and no one at the helm?

Stupid, careless, unobservant and negligent are not geographically limited.

Brian
Master, Oceans, Steam, Motor or Sail, 1600-tons
Chief Mate, Oceans, Unlimited
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Old 08-21-2018, 07:38 PM
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Originally Posted by dsharp View Post
Apparently the dipshits on the east coast don't know how to run a boat. Three collisions and one jetty smack in two weeks, wow.

We will work on our boating skills, you work on border security..Deal?
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Old 08-22-2018, 03:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Capt. Dan View Post
Do you run that way in a crowded waterway? Must sound like a beep fest on your boat!
Common sense is becoming a lost quality.
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Old 08-22-2018, 10:48 AM
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Count me as one that is very glad this was posted. It's worth everyone's time to stare at a picture like that and really consider "how could that have happened" and avoid the temptation to brush it off as "because someone was an idiot." I know that was my initial reaction. But anyone who has been operating boats long enough and hasn't had a moment, or perhaps a close call, when they realized they weren't paying close enough attention probably isn't being honest with themselves. I've caught myself snapping at my wife sometimes when she points out every boat (many a very, very low collision risk) that we could possibly run into. My takeaway from this is that while I'd also appreciate her "adjusting the gain" a little bit, I need to make it a point to encourage her continuing to keep a close walk and speak up if there's any doubt.
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Old 08-22-2018, 04:41 PM
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Originally Posted by chrisrack View Post
Common sense is becoming a lost quality.
"Becoming"...Hell,I don't think there is much Common Sense left now in this Society!
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Old 08-27-2018, 07:29 AM
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Default Another boat crash

Just so the west coast doesn't feel left out. Sailboat crashes into a docked aircraft carrier in San Diego
http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/public-safety/sd-me-midway-crash-20180826-story.html
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Old 08-27-2018, 02:35 PM
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Originally Posted by km1125 View Post
Are they in training for the Navy?
I guess if that was the criteria we can then assume that the dipshits on the west coast don't know how to operate a car. go back where you came from!
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Old 08-27-2018, 02:54 PM
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Originally Posted by efitzgerald1 View Post
I guess if that was the criteria we can then assume that the dipshits on the west coast don't know how to operate a car. go back where you came from!
They sure as hell don’t know how to work a voting booth!
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Old 08-27-2018, 03:52 PM
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Several of you commented on the speed of each boat, the visibility of each, and the maneuverability. It bears repeating.

In addition to waterway rules, common sense is required. The sails were up, making the boat very visible. Compared to the sailboat, the power boat could turn on a dime in any direction …. if the PB skipper noticed the SB. How could he miss the huge sails? The mainsail and the genoa were both up. With the sails to port, the sailboat could see the PW coming from the starboard side but would have little ability to turn out of danger. The PB was going at least 20 knots, maybe more. Only the PB had the ability to turn out of the way, which it could do easily to pass astern - just a nudge to port and pass on the stern of the sailboat - 10 feet is all that would be needed. But that's only if the PB skipper was watching.

I don't think the "if the SB had engine on" argument holds water - the PB skipper could not have heard the SB motor over the din of his motor, and even if the SB had engine on, why did the PB plow into the big-as-day boat? We were not there, so lets let the Coasties gather the facts, but some things are pretty telling.
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Old 08-31-2018, 05:14 AM
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Clipped this from CSR, posting here for those who haven't seen it:

[quote]
winch1995 said:Yesterday, I was passenger on a 34' fishing charter out the eastern shore MD below the bridge. We had fished all morning and by noon we headed in. It was brand new dead rise boat, first trip out. 6 passengers plus the Captain.

We were underway for about 10 minutes, and I estimate our speed was around 30 knots.

Visibility was unlimited.

Most of the passengers were hanging out enjoying the ride, and no one was really paying attention the situation on the water.

I was on a port side bench seat, looking toward the stern. Suddenly, a guy yells "WATCH OUT!!!". I spun around to look forward and all I saw was white sail through the windshield.
Then impact. We t-boned a 30' sailboat with 2 guys in the cockpit. We were thrown to the deck. Now we are on top of the sailboat as you can see by the picture below.

Our captain was kind of dazed, so being an experienced boater, I first told everyone to grab a life vest. We did a head count and injury check and nothing serious beyond cuts, scrapes, and bruises. I could not tell what was happening on the sail boat. Anyway, I turned on the marine radio and Mayday'ed. CG answers and I give GPS coordinates. The guys in the sailboat are shaken up but ok (everyone was shaken up but no panic).

So now we are sitting up on top of the sail boat, with our stern precariously close to being swamped. I found the bilge pump switch and turned it on to "auto" but it did not appear to be working. Switch to manual mode and it started pumping water overboard. The switch set up required that you hold the switch down for the pump to work.

Now I'm at the helm holding this fricking switch down, dangerously close to swamping, and I'm thinking if we swamp, I'm gonna be trapped in the cockpit with no way out. It was kind of dicey at that point.

CG arrives about 15 minutes later and transfers the sail boaters to another boat, then they start to transfer the 6 passengers from the charter to another boat. I have to admit that the CG did an awesome job. Once we were all safely transferred, the CG actually went back to the charter boat and retrieved our coolers!!

DNR, Marine Police, Fire Boats, Tow Boats, we had 'em all.

I was kind of surprised that only 1 boater offered assistance.

So, as far as I know, no serious injuries, but we were so lucky in that respect. It could have been a whole lot worse.

For the life of me, I cannot understand how this happened. Broad daylight, Captain was not drinking, etc. One guy said that he thought the sail boat changed tack.

I guess my big lesson is this: Stay far away from all other boats because you don't know what they might do.

Sharing this story reluctantly since the Captain is a good guy, but it's all over the news anyway. As a Captain of your vessel, be alert at all times. Don't put yourself in a situation where you are too close to other boats. As a passenger, be a second set of eyes for the Captain. Give wide berth to other vessels.

Stuff happens fast.

I have this anxiety right now about boating, but I'm gonna go down to my 27' Sun Dancer and do some maintenance work. I'm sure I'll get over it but I'll not forget yesterday.[\quote]
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Old 08-31-2018, 11:54 AM
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A sailboat with a motor on all ahead fwd still doesn't go that fast, especially dragging all that sail area around. It's like a jogger encountering an elderly grandma shuffling slowly with a walker. Even if she's on your side of the sidewalk it's much more efficient if you change your own course.
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