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Garmin Paddle Wheel Speed Sensor?

Old 11-13-2016, 05:56 AM
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Default Garmin Paddle Wheel Speed Sensor?

I just bought a Garmin 840xs and need an 8 pin water paddle wheel sensor # 010-10279-03 but see that Garmin discontinued this sensor. Yes I can call them tomorrow but thought I’d ask here on what’s the replacement number is?
Old 11-14-2016, 09:01 AM
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So I called Garmin this morning and was told they don't have a replacement for the above paddle wheel sensor. They said to advertise a want ad for a used unit.... .
Old 11-14-2016, 09:11 AM
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Paddle wheels are OLD tech and horribly inaccurate.

Why not just use the GPS for speed?
Old 11-14-2016, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Yrral3215 View Post
Paddle wheels are OLD tech and horribly inaccurate.

Why not just use the GPS for speed?
You are wrong. Paddlewheels can be accurate and while an older technology, are not obsolete. They do foul easily which is a pain. GPS speed only provides speed over ground. This is better for navigation and ETA. Paddlewheel gives you speed through the water. This is very helpful for trolling. Imagine driving 3 knots SOG into a 3 knot current. Your boat speed through the water is actually 6 knots. You think you're lure is going slow enough but the fish aren't biting...
Old 11-14-2016, 01:45 PM
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In my experience, paddle wheels are least accurate at low/trolling speeds - even when new - and it just gets worse as they age. Partly, as you say, because they foul easily and quickly - especially in salt or brackish water. When was the last time you took yours apart and cleaned the bearings?

If you're concerned about consistent trolling speeds, then a trolling speed indicator is best. I just watch the line angle on the downrigger and/or check the lure action before dropping down.
Old 11-14-2016, 02:27 PM
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Can your unit connect to a nmea2000 network? If so there are paddle wheels for nmea2000. Or look at a different transducer manufacturer. I know the p66 came with a paddle wheel version
Old 11-14-2016, 04:26 PM
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Call Gemeco. They should have the replacement .
Old 11-14-2016, 08:42 PM
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As Norton suggests , the 8-pin P66 triducer may be a reasonable work-around, even if you have another T/D. :

http://www.westmarine.com/buy/garmin...ucer--13178363
Old 11-15-2016, 06:38 AM
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Check out the TM160M transom mount. 600w Medium Chirp with paddlewheel. Perfect for a 840xs
Old 11-15-2016, 06:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Amity83 View Post
Paddlewheel gives you speed through the water. This is very helpful for trolling. Imagine driving 3 knots SOG into a 3 knot current. Your boat speed through the water is actually 6 knots....
You're spot on. I troll for Stripers in the Sacramento River and use the paddle wheel speed exclusively. I won't go into details on why it's more accurate trolling in current rather than GPS speed.

I've used the P66 on my previous Garmin 4212 but it flucuated between 2-6mph and when I spoke to Garmin, they said that's just the way they work . So I sold the P66, bought a P79 shoot thru and installed a 6-pin paddle wheel, which recorded accurately.

Being that Garmin no long sells the 8-pin paddle wheel (for what ever their reason), I'll buy another 6-pin paddle wheel and a Wire Block Adapter 010-11613-00 that I used on the 4212 then call it a day.

Last edited by Reel Kahuna; 11-15-2016 at 07:02 AM.
Old 11-15-2016, 07:39 AM
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A very old "Salty Fisherman" who has since passed wrote this about paddle wheel speed.
Thought I'd share ....

One is wasting their time trying to troll by gps speed.

How can you even begin to use gps [ground speed] when there is current ?
Think about it, GPS speed is only good on a lake, or land locked water, where there is "NO" current, (aka horizontal movement of the water).

Now, going with the current or against the current, makes no difference, because the boat is going the same speed "OVER" the top of the water, as long as you haven't changed rpms on your engine.

Just some thing to think about...if you’re running a 19 pitch prop on you’re engine, in a perfect world, that prop is pushing your boat 19 inches with each revolution, but our world is not perfect, so lets say that 19p prop is pushing your boat 14 inches with each rev, & at 700 rpms your moving 2.6 mph on your paddle wheel, going with the current, now turn the boat around, & go against the current at the very same rpm, & see what your paddle wheel reads,....................it should read the same, 2.6 mph.

When you’re in neutral, your drifting with the current, & there is absolutely no resistance, so the boat doesn't know if it's going with, or against the current while in gear, all it knows is, it's going 2.6 mph "OVER" the top of the water in both directions, at the same rpm.

I took a guy out salmon trolling and on our way, we had to pass under the Golden Gate Bridge. It was right in the middle of a -1.9 minus tide, & the current was running about 5.5 mph out to sea.

I asked him to explain to me, just how anyone could even try to troll there using gps speed, as were already going 5.5 mph over the bottom ..."WHILE IN NEUTRAL", & putting the boat in gear, & going with the 5.5 mph current, is putting us at 7.9 mph. on the gps.

Now turn the boat around & try & troll against that outgoing current, heading east... the gps still reads 5.5 mph while the boat is in neutral, & when I put the engine in forward gear, it read, 3.5 mph on the gps,...."BUT" we were traveling backwards out to sea, while the engine was in forward gear heading inland, because the 2 mph the engine was giving us, wasn’t enough to overcome the 5.5 mph outgoing current, so looking at the shore, we were going backwards, but the boat was headed forward.

Don't even think you can use gps for trolling speed while on water where current is present.
Current is the horizontal movement of water, & tide is the vertical [up down] movement of the water.

Get a transducer with a paddle wheel on it & you will find while running at approx 700 rpm, you should be very close to 2.5 mph "OVER THE TOP OF THE WATER" no matter which direction your going, be it with the current, against the current, or even across the current, you’re over the top of water speed, will be the same at the same rpms.
When you’re trolling, never look at the shore [or gps] to adjust your speed, because you’re not taking the current into consideration if you do.

It's the speed the water is passing under your boat that counts, not the speed over the bottom of the river.

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