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VHF radio and transducer question

Old 09-02-2014, 06:56 PM
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Default VHF radio and transducer question

What is the purpose of a VHF receiver that is NMEA 2000 compatible? Is it worth it to spend the extra coin on one of those?

Also, is there only StructureScan ducer (the LSS-2)? Is the 83/200 ducer that comes with the Lowrance bundle the better frequencies for 0 - 150' of water, or would I be better served to purchase a through-hull 50/200 since there seems to be no such thing as a through hull 83/200?

TIA!
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Old 09-03-2014, 05:08 AM
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Nmea compatible VHF allows it to communicate with your gps and take advantage of the dsc feature which among other things is a one button distress call that transmits your gps coordinates to the coast guard.
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Old 09-03-2014, 05:27 AM
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As Akgoff4 said, you can tie it into your unit, but there are NMEA2000 and NMEA0183 compatible units, both have the ability to transmit GPS data, but NMEA2000 has the capability of being tied into certain MFD's via the NMEA2000 network.

The LSS-2 is a structure a structure scan only transducer, and for shallower waters the 83/200 transducer is probably your best bet. Once you start getting past around 200' you will probably want to bump up to the 50/200.

Keith
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Old 09-03-2014, 06:12 AM
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If your plotter/MFD isn't 2000 compatible then it's not worth it.
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Old 09-03-2014, 07:16 AM
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It seems that a DSC VHF is less expensive than a NMEA 2000 VHF. What does interfacing the VHF with the MFD do for you?

Also, how good is the 83/200 ducer included with the Lowrance units?
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Old 09-03-2014, 07:28 AM
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NMEA2000 will basically be just a plug and play connection rather than hardwired in like NMEA0183 would be. You will also be able to use GPS from your MFD if you choose to and if the VHF doesn't already have one installed. You will also be able to view AIS data and from your MFD and your VHF as well as what was mentioned earlier about the DSC using your GPS to show your position in case of an emergency.

Keith
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Old 09-03-2014, 07:49 AM
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i bought a garmin VHF100 which was NMEA0183, i have GPS data from the 840xs chartplotter going to the VHF for DSC, for me i don't have a NMEA2000 network and my engine being a 2006 mercury I didn't really feel there was a need with smartcraft guages plus you have to buy the merc monitor or extra crap to get it to output NMEA2000 data. Some of the newer engines have a plug and play ability to output NMEA2000 data which is very nice, if that is yours...i would look into it.

NMEA2000 network is very nice if you have engine data, and other data you basically can view / configure on any device, it's a very nice plug and play type network. If i were you it would depend on your engine and if you wanted that data accessible on other devices.

I would agree with threeriversmarine on the ducer advice, thru hull definately if you're going deeper, but for those depth you should be fine.

make sure you at least get a NMEA0183 VHF and register it to get a MMSI, boatus, seatow and a few other places you can register a VHF radio to you and your boat.
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Old 09-06-2014, 07:29 PM
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Its makes more sense to get a radio like the Standard Horizon Explorer 1700. Excellent radio with built in GPS so no need for connecting with your plotter.
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Old 09-07-2014, 04:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Capt.Puddie View Post
Its makes more sense to get a radio like the Standard Horizon Explorer 1700. Excellent radio with built in GPS so no need for connecting with your plotter.
I like this idea. This unit makes it very easy to get GPS on your VHF especially if it is remotely mounted such as an overhead electronics box. No need to run any wires as this unit has a built in GPS. The only wires you would need to connect it power/ground, and antenna.

Mike
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Old 09-07-2014, 05:50 AM
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Originally Posted by AFBoggy View Post
It seems that a DSC VHF is less expensive than a NMEA 2000 VHF
A radio having DSC capabilities and a radio having NMEA-2000 capabilities are separate features. One does not replace the other.
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Old 09-07-2014, 09:15 AM
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New recreational boat VHF radios are required by law (FCC) to provide an operating mode called Digital Selective Calling, DSC (class D) , the radio can have a built-in GPS or connect to an existing GPS device, using NMEA 0183 or NMEA 2000 communication protocol to to be compliant with the DSC requirements.

From BoatUS
DSC VHF radios WILL:

  • Have a One-Button Emergency Transmit capability that sends out the vessel's unique MMSI number and, if properly connected to a GPS or Loran, the vessel's latitude/longitude position.
  • Continue sending the distress signal even if the captain is incapacitated.
  • Allow for a non-experienced VHF user to send, with the pressing of one button, a goof-proof continuous distress message.
  • Privately hail another DSC equipped vessel, or shore station, with a known MMSI number. Like having a "VHF phone number" this avoids having to monitor high traffic channels just for a hail from your boating buddy. It even "rings" your radio, similar to a telephone, notifying you that you have a call and then switches you automatically to the channel your caller is waiting on.
  • If properly connected to a Loran or GPS, a "Polling" feature transmits your vessel's position, in digital display, that can be monitored by DSC equipped home station/fleet station or boat.
  • Fully function as all other regular VHF radios.
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Old 09-07-2014, 10:43 AM
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The 83/200 Lowrance gives OK performance for 0-150', if you want better performance you should go CHIRP. With a Lowrance unit you then need SonarHub in addition to a TM150M or B150M transducer. If you buy Simrad NSS Evo2 instead of Lowrance SonarHub is integrated.
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Old 09-07-2014, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by cptkatz View Post
New recreational boat VHF radios are required by law (FCC) to provide an operating mode called Digital Selective Calling, DSC (class D) , the radio can have a built-in GPS or connect to an existing GPS device, using NMEA 0183 or NMEA 2000 communication protocol to to be compliant with the DSC requirements.

From BoatUS
DSC VHF radios WILL:

  • Have a One-Button Emergency Transmit capability that sends out the vessel's unique MMSI number and, if properly connected to a GPS or Loran, the vessel's latitude/longitude position.
  • Continue sending the distress signal even if the captain is incapacitated.
  • Allow for a non-experienced VHF user to send, with the pressing of one button, a goof-proof continuous distress message.
  • Privately hail another DSC equipped vessel, or shore station, with a known MMSI number. Like having a "VHF phone number" this avoids having to monitor high traffic channels just for a hail from your boating buddy. It even "rings" your radio, similar to a telephone, notifying you that you have a call and then switches you automatically to the channel your caller is waiting on.
  • If properly connected to a Loran or GPS, a "Polling" feature transmits your vessel's position, in digital display, that can be monitored by DSC equipped home station/fleet station or boat.
  • Fully function as all other regular VHF radios.
Is it better to purchase one with the GPS built in, such as the Standard Horizon Gx1700, or one that borrows from your GPS/fishfinder, such as the Gx1600?
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Old 09-07-2014, 06:08 PM
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Well...its much simpler to have it internal. ..no connections to make and you will have a backup GPS position available. It also gives you speed and COG. They are stellar radios imo. Very nice display as well.
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Old 09-07-2014, 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by AFBoggy View Post
Is it better to purchase [A VHF Marine Band Class-D DSC radio] with the GPS built in...?
A VHF Marine Band DSC Class-D radio with its own GNSS receiver in the radio is a self-contained system. It will be able to originate DSC transmission with position data included all by itself. That might prove useful in an emergency.
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Old 09-07-2014, 07:39 PM
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Originally Posted by InternationalMarineMike View Post
I like this idea. This unit makes it very easy to get GPS on your VHF especially if it is remotely mounted such as an overhead electronics box. No need to run any wires as this unit has a built in GPS. The only wires you would need to connect it power/ground, and antenna.

Mike
I understand the GPS antenna is internal to the radio. If I mounted in my overhead aluminum electronics box, would it still work? My MFD with internal antenna didn't work when I installed it in the aluminum e-box...I had to use an external antenna.
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Old 09-07-2014, 10:38 PM
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http://www.thegpsstore.com/Standard-...VHF-Radio.aspx

here is a great deal... $30 rebate as well. ..
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Old 09-07-2014, 11:54 PM
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Originally Posted by CLM65 View Post
I understand the GPS antenna is internal to the radio. If I mounted in my overhead aluminum electronics box, would it still work? My MFD with internal antenna didn't work when I installed it in the aluminum e-box...I had to use an external antenna.
No, it will probably not work. If you already have an external antenna in a NEMA2000-network with your MFD, then a VHF with NEMA2000 will be very easy to add to the network.
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Old 09-08-2014, 05:07 AM
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If a DSC distress signal is put out, does the chartplotter (Garmin VHF 100 & 1041 XS connected NMEA 0183) show the location of the distress signal? Or do I have to manually enter the lat/lon of the distress call?
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Old 09-08-2014, 05:48 AM
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Originally Posted by leftyNC View Post
If a DSC distress signal is put out, does the chartplotter (Garmin VHF 100 & 1041 XS connected NMEA 0183) show the location of the distress signal? Or do I have to manually enter the lat/lon of the distress call?
When a VHF Marine Band Class-D DSC radio makes a DSC Distress Alert transmission, it sends the vessel position in the transmitted data. The radio uses the position data is has available. The position data can be from a electronic connection to a GNSS receiver or from data the user has manually entered.
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