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Length of battery time on the water?

Old 10-17-2008, 05:18 AM
  #21  
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Default Re: Length of battery time on the water?

I monitor the voltage on the chartplotter, when it gets to 11.5, I crank. But I have older engines and 11.5 does it, newer engines require more. I also usually keep one of the two batteries off while drifting just for a reserve. I also have a portable kicker just in case.
Just a footnote too, I have both of my batteries deep cycle.........working out pretty good too......can anchor up or drift for about 5 hours before any concern. That's chartplotter, vhf, radio for music, and bumping on the livewell from time to time. Also ocasionally freshwater pump, head flush, and raw water wash down.
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Old 10-17-2008, 05:34 AM
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Default Re: Length of battery time on the water?

BoozeMonkey - 10/16/2008 8:49 PM

I was looking at the Cabaela's AGM batt. wow, the group 24 models weigh 53 pounds! I know i cant live without one but couldnt they find a way to cut the weight. I know its the backpacker in me that wants ultra light, i just figured i would weigh my boat down with freshly caught cod not batteries lol
If you have NASA's budget, you can reduce the weight. For the rest of us, power = weight. Look at other batteries; same power, same weight (or close). If it were practical to make high power, low weight storage batteries, we would all be driving around in electric cars.
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Old 10-17-2008, 05:37 AM
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Default Re: Length of battery time on the water?

for those of you that are really discharging your batts on drifts and then recharging - remember deep discharges are life draining on the batt...better to have more capacity and only draining 20% and then topping off. AGM's can take this much better that lead acid types....
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Old 10-17-2008, 12:06 PM
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Default Re: Length of battery time on the water?

Very true... If you drain a typical cranking battery it is essentially ruined. A deep cycle however can be drained completely and recharged. I've heard, but have yet to be able to confirm, that deep cycles can cause alternator damage because they want a slow steady charge to recharge them which puts a strain on an alternator since its trying to charge it quickly. When I bought my boat I was told by the dealership that they would not install a deep cycle in my boat because it would void the warranty on the alternator. I did however advise anyone with a battery charger to get a deep cycle as their reserve battery for when they are just floating, and when they dock their boat just to hook the battery charger up to recharge the deep cycle.
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Old 10-17-2008, 12:22 PM
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Default Re: Length of battery time on the water?

lknTP17 - 10/17/2008 3:06 PM

Very true... If you drain a typical cranking battery it is essentially ruined. A deep cycle however can be drained completely and recharged. I've heard, but have yet to be able to confirm, that deep cycles can cause alternator damage because they want a slow steady charge to recharge them which puts a strain on an alternator since its trying to charge it quickly. When I bought my boat I was told by the dealership that they would not install a deep cycle in my boat because it would void the warranty on the alternator. I did however advise anyone with a battery charger to get a deep cycle as their reserve battery for when they are just floating, and when they dock their boat just to hook the battery charger up to recharge the deep cycle.
1. Correct on totally discharging a "starting battery"

2. Not true on a Deep Cycle battery. Discharging more than 50% will seriously shorten the life of a deep cycle battery.

3. BS on the alternator story and BS on your boat dealer. He knows how to sell boats but apparently, not much else. A deep cycle battery will not harm the alternator. Many boats come from the factory with deep cycle batteries as the "house bank". Mine has four.
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Old 10-17-2008, 01:24 PM
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Default RE: Length of battery time on the water?

There is a difference between Marine deep cycle and actual deep cycle. Marine deep cycles are masked as a half cranking half deep cycle and are more on the cranking side. Cranking batteries are not designed to be discharged at all, while deep cycles can be without hurting the life of the battery. And yes you can drain a deep cycle fully and it will not do as much damage as draining a cranking. You are right that they are designed to be drained to around 50%. However, the argument with an alternator and a deep cycle is that an alternators purpose is to constantly replace the power being lost to keep a constant around 14 volts. Deep cycles are designed to be charged slowly, and if you drain a deep cycle to 10 volts, its trying to cram 4 volts into the battery instantly which puts a strain on the alternator. Again I've heard both sides of the story not only from my dealership but from battery manufacturers and other forums. I've yet to find an article that did research on this. Either way, the battery wasn't a selling point on the boat and opted for a 2nd cranking battery and have yet to have problems.
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Old 10-17-2008, 04:25 PM
  #27  
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Default Re: Length of battery time on the water?

Would this be a decent single battery for my boat?

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...rine+Batteries

Why or why not?
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Old 10-17-2008, 04:36 PM
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Default Re: Length of battery time on the water?

BoozeMonkey - 10/17/2008 7:25 PM

Would this be a decent single battery for my boat?

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...rine+Batteries

Why or why not?
good choice! - actaully about the best battery you can buy - an AGM made by the odyssey people and they wear like iron. I'm partial to them as I own 4 of them (the odyssey counterpart). buy it and forget about batt problems for 5 years or so...maybe longer....
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Old 10-17-2008, 04:42 PM
  #29  
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Default RE: Length of battery time on the water?

lknTP17 - 10/17/2008 1:24 PM There is a difference between Marine deep cycle and actual deep cycle. Marine deep cycles are masked as a half cranking half deep cycle and are more on the cranking side. Cranking batteries are not designed to be discharged at all, while deep cycles can be without hurting the life of the battery. And yes you can drain a deep cycle fully and it will not do as much damage as draining a cranking. You are right that they are designed to be drained to around 50%. However, the argument with an alternator and a deep cycle is that an alternators purpose is to constantly replace the power being lost to keep a constant around 14 volts. Deep cycles are designed to be charged slowly, and if you drain a deep cycle to 10 volts, its trying to cram 4 volts into the battery instantly which puts a strain on the alternator. Again I've heard both sides of the story not only from my dealership but from battery manufacturers and other forums. I've yet to find an article that did research on this. Either way, the battery wasn't a selling point on the boat and opted for a 2nd cranking battery and have yet to have problems.
The alternator voltage is regulated so that is not the issue. The potential problem with alternators and deep cycle banks are that if you have to replace too many amp hours drained out of deep cycles then the alternator has to work at full output for too long to try to bring the battery(ies) back up. Unless the alternator has enough output to bring the batteries back up in a reasonable time then is gets too hot. As an alt heats up the amp output is reduced so an alt rated for say 100 amps may only be putting out 80-85% of that when it is hot.
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Old 10-17-2008, 04:42 PM
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Default Re: Length of battery time on the water?

whew!...I was looking at a couple others but this one had the best reviews by far. Thanks for all the tips Glen. I should be able to drift fish with this for a little while right? like I said im just running a vhf & GPS/sonar....and rarely a live well pump
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Old 10-17-2008, 04:50 PM
  #31  
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Default Re: Length of battery time on the water?

BoozeMonkey - 10/17/2008 7:42 PM

whew!...I was looking at a couple others but this one had the best reviews by far. Thanks for all the tips Glen. I should be able to drift fish with this for a little while right? like I said im just running a vhf & GPS/sonar....and rarely a live well pump
absolutley...I still don't like you tunring off the motor with just one batt - if you don't want to add one, think about a emergency $75 dollar jump pack you can carry...as not matter how good the batt, sh** happens...if you can keep the batt charged while at home with a battery tender ($35) the battt will last a lot longer....

google "battery tender"
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Old 10-22-2008, 07:37 PM
  #32  
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Default Re: Length of battery time on the water?

How about one of these?

Never have a dead battery again!

Battery Brain prevents a dead battery using micro-electronic technology to continually monitor your battery’s voltage and isolate it from any possible discharge. It will even disconnect it from the vessel's electrical system, at a predetermined level, to ensure that you always have enough power to start your engine. You'll save on towing and replacement battery costs and reduce the risk of theft with remote disconnection. Easily installs on the positive terminal with a wrench and a screwdriver. Waterproof and designed for marine use. Maximum ignition surge current 1100A, normal operating mode, 250A. Draws 10mA in operation.


http://www.smgy.net/

Designed specifically for marine use
Extra rugged for saltwater durability
Running capability of 1,000 amps for 20 consecutive seconds
Single moving part
Stainless-steel hardware
Salt water corrosion resistant, with marine grade construction
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Includes 2 remotes
Marine Battery Brain, Type III (with Remote) $99.99
Marine Battery Brain, Type IV (with Wired Manual Switch) $99.99





http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs...9&classNum=208
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Old 10-22-2008, 07:48 PM
  #33  
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Default Re: Length of battery time on the water?

BuddahB - 10/16/2008 7:06 PM I generally run out to the fishing grounds with the battery switch on "ALL", then if I intend to drift I switch to one or the other so If I run it low I still have a fully charged secondary battery to start. At least I hope so...
I'm not sure I'd do that either. I'm c+p this from Grady White's web site; it's a pretty good explanation on how to properly use a battery switch with a single engine:

Battery select switches are found on boats with two or more batteries. They designate which battery or battery bank is being used for starting the engine, powering the accessories and receiving a charge from the outboard engine(s). There are four positions on the switch: 1, 2, BOTH and OFF. Position 1 pulls from Battery 1 or Bank 1; Position 2 pulls from Battery 2 or Bank 2. The BOTH position is utilized when you cannot crank the engine in Positions 1 or 2 alone due to weak batteries, and combines the power from both batteries or banks. After starting an engine the switch should be returned to the 1 or 2 position. We do not recommend operating for extended periods in the BOTH position. In normal use with twin engines, select Position 1 on one switch and Position 2 on the other so both batteries are being used and charged. On single engine applications, alternate between Position 1 and 2 routinely. The OFF position should be used only when the engine is not running to secure the electrical system and prevent accidental discharge. The bilge pump automatic float switches will still operate when the switch is in the OFF position. Note: Never turn the battery select switch to the OFF position while an engine is running, including passing through the OFF position when switching from 1 to 2. This can cause damage to the engine's charging system.
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