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Any good smartphone GPS apps?

Old 07-11-2019, 10:04 AM
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Default Any good smartphone GPS apps?

Are there any GPS apps for iPhone that work without the cell towers? I dont need anything special, just a general idea of where the hell I am on these swamp areas - lost cell phone signal last time I was out.
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Old 07-11-2019, 10:08 AM
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iPhone let’s you download maps to be offline used. Google maps allows you to do the same.
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Old 07-11-2019, 11:49 AM
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I have used OsmAnd, though on Android. Works very well.

They will want to charge you for map downloads (the app itself is free), but you can just download the map files off the web (https://download.osmand.net/list.php) and transfer them to the phone yourself.
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Old 07-11-2019, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by anthem-00 View Post
iPhone let’s you download maps to be offline used. Google maps allows you to do the same.
Thanks, wasn't aware of this - would be good to have at least, but main issue is I need to position myself on the map so I know where I am in these mazes of swamp.
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Old 07-11-2019, 01:18 PM
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Get the navionics app

your phone does not need cell service for gps pos.
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Old 07-11-2019, 02:03 PM
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I've never had an iPhone; only Androids, and every one I've ever had, has a GPS built in to the phone. Navionics app charts, Geocaching apps, compass apps, and more, all work with the internal GPS chip and do not need cell towers.

If your iPhone doesn't include GPS in the basic (????) phones, maybe you could pick up an Android phone, download the apps you want (free, and can just turn on wifi for the download). After you do that, you will have a GPS position/navigation system in your pocket.

Doesn't iPhones include GPS?
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Old 07-11-2019, 02:16 PM
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C-map embark is a good one.


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Old 07-11-2019, 03:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Bison View Post
Be advised, if your intent is to employ the smartphone as a GPS device for navigation it will provide accurate information only so long as you are within cell service range. If you are intending to employ the maps outside the range of cell towers the GPS function will no longer function accurately, as the towers can no longer triangulate on your position, nor does the phone handset have any internal GPS reception capability. Cell tower to handset range is generally no more than a three mile range. So for inland lakes, rivers, or near shore the GPS app. may function, but beyond three miles from shore communication and GPS functions are null. Examples: Along the shores of the Great Lakes the GPS app would provide accurate data, but not when attempting to cross, say Lake Ontario from the US until the handset was in range of Canadian cells. During such a crossing the handset would experience about a 30 mile or one hour null period, during which a user would have to rely on a compass and dead reckoning. Off the Atlantic coast in excess of three miles the same situation would be experienced.

On land or on inland lakes there are few cell tower null zones (areas without cell service) so the maps and apps function and provide accurate information, but outside of cell service areas. The apps will not provide accurate data and the handset, android or iPhone, do not possess any inherent capability to receive information from GPS satellites. Your location on a map displayed on a cell phone is dependent upon cell towers triangulating your signal strength and approximating your position on a graphical map; within cell service areas the accuracy is quite good, but offshore it will be questionable and or null.

my iPhone does not require cell service to work. Only to have maps download.
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Old 07-11-2019, 03:13 PM
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I have a Droid and have accurately used my phone as a GPS 90 miles offshore in the Atlantic. I am 99% sure it is the same situation with apple.

And by the way, I love the navionics app.
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Old 07-11-2019, 03:18 PM
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Navionics on my Android..
We actually used it to verify POS 110miles out while fishing a few weeks ago. The Garmin MFD orientation heading was acting up so we used my phone to verify course and monitor our POS...it absolutely works well away from cell phone range..
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Old 07-11-2019, 03:27 PM
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https://www.gaiagps.com/
I used this on a recent trip out west. Just the base maps do a fair job of showing the smaller forest service roads and trails. I was far out of cell service for much of the trip, and have a complete track of everywhere we went.
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Old 07-11-2019, 03:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Bison View Post
Be advised, if your intent is to employ the smartphone as a GPS device for navigation it will provide accurate information only so long as you are within cell service range. If you are intending to employ the maps outside the range of cell towers the GPS function will no longer function accurately, as the towers can no longer triangulate on your position, nor does the phone handset have any internal GPS reception capability. Cell tower to handset range is generally no more than a three mile range. So for inland lakes, rivers, or near shore the GPS app. may function, but beyond three miles from shore communication and GPS functions are null. Examples: Along the shores of the Great Lakes the GPS app would provide accurate data, but not when attempting to cross, say Lake Ontario from the US until the handset was in range of Canadian cells. During such a crossing the handset would experience about a 30 mile or one hour null period, during which a user would have to rely on a compass and dead reckoning. Off the Atlantic coast in excess of three miles the same situation would be experienced.

On land or on inland lakes there are few cell tower null zones (areas without cell service) so the maps and apps function and provide accurate information, but outside of cell service areas. The apps will not provide accurate data and the handset, android or iPhone, do not possess any inherent capability to receive information from GPS satellites. Your location on a map displayed on a cell phone is dependent upon cell towers triangulating your signal strength and approximating your position on a graphical map; within cell service areas the accuracy is quite good, but offshore it will be questionable and or null.
I call BS. I’ve used both the c-maps and Navionics apps 40nm offshore and they were showing exactly the same cords as my evo 3
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Old 07-11-2019, 04:05 PM
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With iPads you need to have one with that is cellular capable to get the GPS functionality. However, you do not have to use the cell function or be in a cell service area for the GPS to work. It's just that in Apple's infinite wisdom, they only included the GPS function with the cellular hardware. If you have the GPS function, the iPad can use the cell location to get a rough idea of your location faster than it can get a GPS position. Once the GPS resolves, the position is updated (Androids usually do this too).

With Android devices you can get them with or without GPS (although most Android phones have GPS because of the E911 thing in NA). Android tablets may or may not have GPS.
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Old 07-11-2019, 05:03 PM
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A-GPS (Assisted mode GPS) which is used by smartphones, is making the time to fix shorter, and also allows fix under more difficult conditions. The accuracy is as good, or even better, when having GPS fix without assisted mode.

I have never heard about an Android tablet without GPS. And I've had more than 10 of them myself.
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Old 07-11-2019, 08:29 PM
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Originally Posted by MaddMac View Post
Navionics on my Android..
We actually used it to verify POS 110miles out while fishing a few weeks ago. The Garmin MFD orientation heading was acting up so we used my phone to verify course and monitor our POS...it absolutely works well away from cell phone range..
Thats great to know, thanks.
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Old 07-11-2019, 08:33 PM
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Based on all of the good things you guys are saying about Navionics going to give this a shot and download it, thanks.
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Old 07-11-2019, 09:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Bison View Post
Be advised, if your intent is to employ the smartphone as a GPS device for navigation it will provide accurate information only so long as you are within cell service range..
I'm generally in air plane mode when using gps apps because they draw the battery so much faster. the phone has a built in gps which still works totally fine in airplane mode. cell serivce is not needed.
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Old 07-12-2019, 05:29 AM
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Yesterday, I posted a reply regarding cell phones as a navigation tool. My response was based on my understanding of technology which I did not keep up on. Following the post, I explored the net and net and read I my knowledge of cellphone operations was at least 25 years in a rears. To all who saw and read my BS. Please accept my apology! To those of you who corrected my miss information, thank you. Thank you for educating me and thank you for dispelling the disinformation I had posted.

One of the aspects of The Hull Truth I really enjoy is the amount of learning one can attain.

Respectfully,
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Old 07-12-2019, 05:39 AM
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I use Backcountry Navigator Pro. It works without cell coverage and has a variety of maps to choose including topo, sat and marine. You have the ability to download the maps prior to leaving on a trip that will be out of cell range.
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Old 07-12-2019, 06:05 AM
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I have had Garmin Blue Chart on my phone for several years cause I thought I'd be transferring stuff to my Garmin GPS at the time (never really did) and it works when I get out of cell range.
Anyone have Garmin then switched away to something else like Navionics can comment on why the switch?

I have Simrad GPS units in the fishing boat and was looking to switch to something else if I could wirelessly transfer routes and stuff to the simrad
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