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using feet to propel a kayak

Old 12-05-2015, 10:03 AM
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Just what I was afraid of, just when everyone seems to think one is better then the other someone comes along and disputes the others and an argument forms.

Overall it seems that using ones legs has more advantages that I could use over using just ones arms. For my needs it sounds like a Hobie type yak is best for my needs and uses. I don't fish in super shallow waters and getting where I want to be fast along with the ability to use my arms as an alternate means of propulsion can't hurt.

Thanks to all for the great replies, next for me is to wait until spring to test a few.
Old 12-05-2015, 11:02 AM
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We are all passionate about the different styles. The fact of the matter is I could do more than half of my fishing out of an inner tube or even a waxed card board box. The info though presented here did get a little out of hand and I am guilty of propagating much of it, as you said, give them all a try and pick the one best for you. I started out in a nine ft paddle mini-x out in the open ocean. People thought i was crazy but I still caught fish.

Rather than focusing on the argumentative side, just know that any craft that can safely get you on the water will catch fish. I have been an avid fisherman all of my life. But since 2011 when I started kayak fishing, it revolutionized the way I look at fishing and I have caught more fish and enjoyed every minute of it. I own powerboats but they have gone unused since 2011.

Good luck in your selection! Just be prepared for an addiction that is insanely fun!
Old 12-06-2015, 01:01 PM
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When it comes to hull speed, I can easily maintain it far longer in my mirage revolution than I could in a paddle kayak. People in different physical condition may have other results, and a longer narrower boat may have a significantly higher hull speed.
For me the greatest advantage of the mirage drive is it's absolute silence at low speed. I can move without noise or surface disturbance, even against a breeze. It seems that even at low cadence, the mirage produces quite a bit of thrust.
Old 12-07-2015, 12:23 PM
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It all depends what you want to do. I have a sit in Wilderness Systems touring yak. I also have very light weight carbon fiber paddles. I can paddle circles around my brother and his hobie mirage yak
Old 12-07-2015, 01:42 PM
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I have just finished reading all three pages of this interesting thread and as an owner of a Wavewalk 500 will add my two cents. About twenty years ago I fished for a season out of a long sit inside kayak adapted for fishing. It worked but was uncomfortable and very unstable. Two years ago I started looking at standup kayaks to be able to fish the shallow marsh areas off the ICW near my home. I looked at many SUP kayaks and was thinking the Jackson Cosa or Cuda would work for me. Then I heard about the Wavewalk. I learned that instead of reaching for a pull-up handle to stand you simply stood up from a normal sitting position. That attracted me to look further into the Wavewalk which I eventually bought.
The Wavewalk doesn't come with all the fancy accessories that others have unless you chose to purchase them. I got the standard model with two flush mount rod holders. I soon started to add my accessories like a homemade paddle holder to lay the paddle in on the side of the boat to minimize noise and a anchor trolley on the side. I also got a Stix It anchor pole. A couple cleats help to tie off the anchor line or pole.
The cockpit is 6 feet long which is a saddle seat. This allows for so much storage I never worry about how much equipment I bring. You sit on this saddle that I would compare to sitting on a commode (opened myself for jokes here) on which you can move along all 6 feet. You can change your leg position for comfort, stand up to stretch or paddle and of course fish. The stability is amazing. It is only 28 inches wide so it's not like a big heavy wide SUP. Each hull is about 4inches wide so it is fast and nimble. Standing and paddling is a breeze especially with a tail wind. I have some back issues so being able to stand and paddle for long distances is a relief at times.
Speaking of stability, after a few months I tried throwing a cast net from it for shrimp. The past two years I have filled my freezer with a year plus supply of nice greentail shrimp. I now have a culling board and container for the shrimp rigged for the front of the cockpit.
Transport is easy, no special cartop carrier. Just a standard roof rack and ropes or rachet straps. Launching and retrieval is easy as you enter over the stern and out the front. Never get wet. Falling out or tipping over is almost impossible. Others have their wet suit etc and I wear shorts or jeans and water shoes or white shrimper boats.
I could go on but the Wavewalk may not be for everyone but I will guarantee you all that it is perfect for a great many, especially fisherman. I know that pedal kayaks are nice for fishing but to me overrated and doesn't trump comfort and staying dry. Anyone looking at a kayak for any type of activity should do themselves a favor and give the Wavewalk a long hard look.
Old 12-07-2015, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Stief47 View Post
I have just finished reading all three pages of this interesting thread and as an owner of a Wavewalk 500 will add my two cents. About twenty years ago I fished for a season out of a long sit inside kayak adapted for fishing. It worked but was uncomfortable and very unstable. Two years ago I started looking at standup kayaks to be able to fish the shallow marsh areas off the ICW near my home. I looked at many SUP kayaks and was thinking the Jackson Cosa or Cuda would work for me. Then I heard about the Wavewalk. I learned that instead of reaching for a pull-up handle to stand you simply stood up from a normal sitting position. That attracted me to look further into the Wavewalk which I eventually bought.
The Wavewalk doesn't come with all the fancy accessories that others have unless you chose to purchase them. I got the standard model with two flush mount rod holders. I soon started to add my accessories like a homemade paddle holder to lay the paddle in on the side of the boat to minimize noise and a anchor trolley on the side. I also got a Stix It anchor pole. A couple cleats help to tie off the anchor line or pole.
The cockpit is 6 feet long which is a saddle seat. This allows for so much storage I never worry about how much equipment I bring. You sit on this saddle that I would compare to sitting on a commode (opened myself for jokes here) on which you can move along all 6 feet. You can change your leg position for comfort, stand up to stretch or paddle and of course fish. The stability is amazing. It is only 28 inches wide so it's not like a big heavy wide SUP. Each hull is about 4inches wide so it is fast and nimble. Standing and paddling is a breeze especially with a tail wind. I have some back issues so being able to stand and paddle for long distances is a relief at times.
Speaking of stability, after a few months I tried throwing a cast net from it for shrimp. The past two years I have filled my freezer with a year plus supply of nice greentail shrimp. I now have a culling board and container for the shrimp rigged for the front of the cockpit.
Transport is easy, no special cartop carrier. Just a standard roof rack and ropes or rachet straps. Launching and retrieval is easy as you enter over the stern and out the front. Never get wet. Falling out or tipping over is almost impossible. Others have their wet suit etc and I wear shorts or jeans and water shoes or white shrimper boats.
I could go on but the Wavewalk may not be for everyone but I will guarantee you all that it is perfect for a great many, especially fisherman. I know that pedal kayaks are nice for fishing but to me overrated and doesn't trump comfort and staying dry. Anyone looking at a kayak for any type of activity should do themselves a favor and give the Wavewalk a long hard look.
a great review of the wavewalk kayaks very similar to the ones I saw on another board. if their marketing efforts would focus on discussion like this, they would sell many more of them. I was actually quite interested in the design for stand up and bowfishing possibilities.

what type of fishing do you do? have you had a chance to fish it in open ocean conditions in say 2 to 3 ft Wind waves? do you have any pics or video of fishing in rougher conditions or surf launches. ?

I was really curious and was considering different models for different conditions. and as a senior poster your info would mean a lot more to me.

thanks for the information.
Old 12-07-2015, 07:24 PM
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The kayak fishing I do inshore in mostly shallow water under 10 ft deep. Usually it is a marsh type area for Red Drum, Speckled trout and flounder. I also have a 22ft CC that I use in the ocean out to about 40 miles. I have never tried using my Wavewalk in the surf or the ocean and I see no reason why one couldn't. Being open you may take on some water launching. I would add some extra flotation if I tried it. Spray hood may help but you may still take on water. Bailing isn't a big deal. I have a bleach bottle bailer but have never used it. I have not had a reason or the interest to use it in the surf. Someday I may add a small gas motor to increase my range. I think a 2 to 3 foot sea that isn't breaking much would be no problem. I have been caught in many big boat wakes that were no problem, even standing.
One person mentioned how quiet the Hobie fins are which makes sense on the surface. I wonder if sub surface they cause turbulence or noise that would scare fish. If you try a little you can paddle with very little, if any, noise and turbulence.
The wavewalk website has some video of surf launches I think. Maybe there are some posts of ocean fishing. A Nantucket Sleigh Ride with a big fish would be fun. I've done it with a descent Drum inshore.
Oh, one last thing, I think that other companies including Hobie do a pretty good job of hyping there product also.
Old 12-08-2015, 08:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Stief47 View Post
The kayak fishing I do inshore in mostly shallow water under 10 ft deep. Usually it is a marsh type area for Red Drum, Speckled trout and flounder. I also have a 22ft CC that I use in the ocean out to about 40 miles. I have never tried using my Wavewalk in the surf or the ocean and I see no reason why one couldn't. Being open you may take on some water launching. I would add some extra flotation if I tried it. Spray hood may help but you may still take on water. Bailing isn't a big deal. I have a bleach bottle bailer but have never used it. I have not had a reason or the interest to use it in the surf. Someday I may add a small gas motor to increase my range. I think a 2 to 3 foot sea that isn't breaking much would be no problem. I have been caught in many big boat wakes that were no problem, even standing.
One person mentioned how quiet the Hobie fins are which makes sense on the surface. I wonder if sub surface they cause turbulence or noise that would scare fish. If you try a little you can paddle with very little, if any, noise and turbulence.
The wavewalk website has some video of surf launches I think. Maybe there are some posts of ocean fishing. A Nantucket Sleigh Ride with a big fish would be fun. I've done it with a descent Drum inshore.
Oh, one last thing, I think that other companies including Hobie do a pretty good job of hyping there product also.
good stuff. though the topic is pedal vs paddle this type of info should be the type of review for the wavewalker, not the report I originally called BS on which is just ridiculous.

I waS looking for a platform for potential fly fishing and bow fishing in shallow weed filled lakes for pike where something like this might be ideal. I troll a lot in open ocean or jig over specific areas in heavy current so the hands free aspect of a Native Propel or Hobie mirage drives is too much of an advantage to give up. but for your application and for something like bowfishing in shallow waters, I can see the wavewalker as a possible option. Im considering the new Hobie mirage drive paddle board for that application still because im so impressed with the Hobie Drives but Thanks for the info! Much more informative and believable.
Old 12-10-2015, 05:42 AM
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I'm glad to see this thread and all the actual users chime in, I'm watching for a used hobie with mirage to give that a try.
Old 12-10-2015, 06:10 AM
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Thanks Kardinal. Each kayak has it's advantages and it's all personal needs and preference. I have trolled while paddling and it was fine in the inshore waters. I can see why deep jigging would be easier in a pedal drive, especially in moving water. For me it was all about comfortable back friendly seating and ease of standing. After getting it I have become very happy with the other attributes and may move up to the larger new W700 model.
Good talk and info on this thread.
Old 01-05-2016, 10:45 AM
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I wanna put up an additional 5 grand on the boy (out****** vs Adult (wave walker) Being a 2015 pa 14 owner all I can say is that Gonzeaux is so lost and confused about the reality of Kayak fishing. Please tell be how well that upright sitting position or kneeling sitting position works for you with a twenty mile wind in your face LMAO. I have peddled over 15 miles in 2 -4 ft seas and 15 mile an hour winds in the gulf. Do you have any similar experiences? The bottom post is a 7 ft Blacktip! Sorry for the passion but his comments are ridiculous! PS I am unable to post additional pics of catches for some reason. I was wanting to post the most beautiful 4ft Bull Mahi I caught on my 5th trip out in a yak 3 miles south of Pensacola Beach Pier.
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Old 01-12-2016, 03:05 PM
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Kayak Definition: "a long narrow boat that is pointed at both ends and that is moved by a paddle with two blades" - MERRIAM-WEBSTER

After looking over my buddies Hobie Pro Angler the other day it's clear that these are not kayaks anymore. They are boats. Pedal boats. They are way too heavy and bulky to keep calling them kayaks in my opinion. It's a different class of craft. Each has different benefits and it's a matter of what suits your needs and budget. Just an opinion.

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Old 01-12-2016, 06:30 PM
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Originally Posted by dchristie7 View Post
Kayak Definition: "a long narrow boat that is pointed at both ends and that is moved by a paddle with two blades" - MERRIAM-WEBSTER

After looking over my buddies Hobie Pro Angler the other day it's clear that these are not kayaks anymore. They are boats. Peddle boats. They are way to heavy and bulky to keep calling them kayaks in my opinion. It's a different class of craft. Each has different benefits and it's a matter of what suits your needs and budget. Just an opinion.
I hear you. My Arctic Hawk is 17'11" and probably weighs well under 50 lbs. It moves like a dream compared to these heavy plastic barges.

But it is hard to fish out of. Too tippy.
Old 01-12-2016, 06:51 PM
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Let me clear up something about pedal vs paddle. I will tie the stern of my Hobie Revo up to the stern of two of those Wavewalks with the strongest paddlers you can find, and I will pull them backwards and catch fish while I am doing it.
Old 01-13-2016, 01:21 PM
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Originally Posted by dchristie7 View Post
Kayak Definition: "a long narrow boat that is pointed at both ends and that is moved by a paddle with two blades" - MERRIAM-WEBSTER

After looking over my buddies Hobie Pro Angler the other day it's clear that these are not kayaks anymore. They are boats. Peddle boats. They are way to heavy and bulky to keep calling them kayaks in my opinion. It's a different class of craft. Each has different benefits and it's a matter of what suits your needs and budget. Just an opinion.



Not that it really matters but Hobie doesn't call the Pro Angler a kayak. They aren't trying to fool anyone. I can't afford one but I can tell you it is a fantastic fishing platform. And it is pedal not peddle.............. unless you are selling them. ;?

Sorry, couldn't help myself.
Old 01-13-2016, 03:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Paul Barnard View Post
Let me clear up something about pedal vs paddle. I will tie the stern of my Hobie Revo up to the stern of two of those Wavewalks with the strongest paddlers you can find, and I will pull them backwards and catch fish while I am doing it.
No doubt. People don't understand the power of the Mirage Drive until they experience it. The power reminds me more of a diesel truck rather than a sports car. In other words the drives will not scream across the water, but they will take plenty of wind and current abuse before it really slows down.

I had two friends come up to the side of my Hobie to hang on while I brought them home for a few miles into some bad current. They simply could not maintain paddle strokes necessary to get them home without intense struggle. By contrast, I sipped on a beer while towing the three of us back to the truck with one Mirage Drive.

I can also attest to a handful of kayak friends that went cheap the first or second time purchasing kayaks. All of them upgraded to Hobie kayaks eventually.
Old 01-13-2016, 05:20 PM
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_+1 to that, my buddy has a hobie revo 16 and he towed his two dive buddies to the ramp because the wind picked up. Its no joke...

His only complaint after kicking our asses is..i wish mine was a POS so I could drag it off the cliffs, rocks, driveways. I told him soon enough, the new factor will wear off
Old 01-14-2016, 08:15 PM
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Originally Posted by trout25red View Post
No doubt. People don't understand the power of the Mirage Drive until they experience it. The power reminds me more of a diesel truck rather than a sports car. In other words the drives will not scream across the water, but they will take plenty of wind and current abuse before it really slows down.
Ok. But outside of fishing and diving, that diesel truck comparison is hardly favorable to the Hobies. The Mirage 16 weighs nearly 100 lbs. A 17' or 18' sit in kayak typically weighs about 50 lbs. or less. Even a less expensive plastic version still weighs a lot less than that Hobie. And you don't sit on top of it while it plows ahead, you essentially wear it, controlling it with your hips as well as your paddle strokes. You are not riding it, you and the boat are functioning as a unit. It is a completely different animal.

You don't get that with a pedal kayak.
Old 01-15-2016, 06:38 AM
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Originally Posted by rwmct View Post
Ok. But outside of fishing and diving, that diesel truck comparison is hardly favorable to the Hobies. The Mirage 16 weighs nearly 100 lbs. A 17' or 18' sit in kayak typically weighs about 50 lbs. or less. Even a less expensive plastic version still weighs a lot less than that Hobie. And you don't sit on top of it while it plows ahead, you essentially wear it, controlling it with your hips as well as your paddle strokes. You are not riding it, you and the boat are functioning as a unit. It is a completely different animal.

You don't get that with a pedal kayak.
The OP (who is now banned) was interested in fishing kayaks. A pedal craft is superior in every way as a fishing craft.
Old 01-15-2016, 09:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Paul Barnard View Post
The OP (who is now banned) was interested in fishing kayaks. A pedal craft is superior in every way as a fishing craft.
I get that. But the discussion ended up being a little more general re pedal vs. paddle.

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