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Wanted. Fuel tank pressure tested

Old 02-07-2019, 01:56 PM
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Default Wanted. Fuel tank pressure tested

I am looking at boat in New Orleans. I am having a hard time finding someone who can pressure test a fuel tank. Any help, leads, referrals would be appreciated.

Thanks
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Old 02-07-2019, 02:01 PM
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How big of a tank? Assuming built in? Is the tank polymer or metal?
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Old 02-07-2019, 02:05 PM
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About 170 gallons. Aluminum.
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Old 02-07-2019, 04:08 PM
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It’s not that hard to do it yourself. Threaded nipple with a T for a gauge and then a valve and a fitting for air. Pancake air compressor, go up to 2/3 pounds, close the valve wait 10 min.
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Old 02-07-2019, 05:23 PM
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I know it's not that hard. And it surprises me that the places I called said they couldn't do it. They are happy to perform the engine inspection. I am flying down from North Carolina and can't bring the tools to do it myself.
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Old 02-07-2019, 06:08 PM
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170 gallons is a lot of volume of air...2 or 3 psi would be the max I would do. But, chances are, you will not be able to snoop all the seams/fittings for leaks. You would have to rely on a gauge with very little range/scale to see a leak. Then, you may not see it for a while, dealing with that volume. I have the capabilities via my place of employment. However, the smallest precision gauge I think we have is a 30 psi gauge. But, it’s digital and has a very high degree of accuracy.

Just thinking through this, you would need to plug off the fill cap and vent. Then, you may be able to pressure it up using the fuel line? Again, you would be heavily reliant upon the gauge. With that much volume...a small pinhole seep would take a long time to register a pressure drop.

Not a tough task...but, also not the most practical.
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Old 02-07-2019, 06:13 PM
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nobody wants to do it bc of the liability

I'd be willing to help you depending on what part of nola we're talking about. You own the liability, period.

DO NOT go more than 2-4 lbs psi. You can see the tank expand at that pressure and after 5-6 psi it literally can blow up.

The people that do this (and have the insurance etc to back it up) are generally tank builders/welders. We've had it done on yachts I ran (tanks in the 600-1,000 gallon range). Not something to take lightly.

And yes, you need a QUALITY low pressure gauge.

If it's an alum tank that's older just plan on replacing it.
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Old 02-08-2019, 07:08 AM
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PM sent rbhankins
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Old 02-08-2019, 07:20 AM
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If it was closer we would be glad to pressure test it. Sorry
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Old 02-15-2019, 12:08 PM
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I do it on every build, we go 1.5 psi for 20-30 min depending on size with max 0.1 psi drop due to any ambient air temp swings. Then soapy water on every weld and fitting. We use speclized gear that reads to the 0.001 psi on a calabrated digital readout.

If I had a boat for sale personally and you showed up with an air chuck and wanted to pull all my vent lines and blow my tank up over 3 psi, our conversation would be over.
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Old 02-15-2019, 12:53 PM
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just fill it with gas and use your nose unless you already know it's leaking?
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