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Gulf dead zone thoughts

Old 06-11-2019, 03:13 AM
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Default Gulf dead zone thoughts

https://katc.com/news/covering-louis...f-of-mexico-2/ kinda new too offshore fishing what are yall thoughts on past dead zones? Do you still catch fish in these so called dead zones.

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06-11-2019, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by snapperkiller View Post
The dead zone is also usually located at the very bottom. Usually less that 10%. The algae and nutrients in the rest of the water column make for excellent fishing. That is one reason the bottom has no oxygen left.
Wrong. The dead zone is always under my boat wherever I seem to go fishing. At least that's my excuse from now on.

Old 06-11-2019, 06:30 AM
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they put this same report out every year. the "dead zone" is one of the best fisheries in the world.
Old 06-11-2019, 07:21 AM
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Know some of the people that measure it each year, not computer models. Actual real science where measurements are taken, finding are studies and a factual conclusion is drawn. The facts never make it to the news. What is reported each year and what is actually happening in real life are not the same. The gloom and doom forecast of the "dead zone" follows the same narrative as global warming, over-hyped bullshit.
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Old 06-11-2019, 08:20 AM
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Weird, I smashed a 5 man limit of 15+ pound snapper in that dead zone just two weeks ago....
Old 06-11-2019, 08:39 AM
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The dead zones are areas of low oxygen. Nutrients come in, cause algae blooms, algae dies and depletes oxygen. More nutrients equal more algae blooms. Scientists routinely sample the waters, measure the O2 and make plots/charts of the various levels. No guessing, just straight numbers, this sample from this location had x amount of O2 per liter

They are making predictions that the increased nutrient run off from the floods this year will increase low O2 areas. Their sampling will tell whether their predictions were correct
Old 06-11-2019, 08:55 AM
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Better known as Muddy Water!!!
Old 06-11-2019, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by dryhydro View Post
Better known as Muddy Water!!!
Yes, "muddy water" extends out pretty far near Freeport, TX, too. Some of my go to Kingfish spots have not been productive even though water temp seems high enough. They seem to be staying deeper, too.
Old 06-11-2019, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by dryhydro View Post
Better known as Muddy Water!!!
You can have muddy water without it being low in oxygen
Old 06-11-2019, 10:16 AM
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Yep!!!
Old 06-11-2019, 10:47 AM
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The dead zone is also usually located at the very bottom. Usually less that 10%. The algae and nutrients in the rest of the water column make for excellent fishing. That is one reason the bottom has no oxygen left.
Old 06-11-2019, 11:20 AM
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The thickness of the dead zone is on average less than a meter, starting at the sea floor. If you are targeting marine species that live and swim more than three feet above the bottom, fish away.
Old 06-11-2019, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by snapperkiller View Post
The dead zone is also usually located at the very bottom. Usually less that 10%. The algae and nutrients in the rest of the water column make for excellent fishing. That is one reason the bottom has no oxygen left.
Wrong. The dead zone is always under my boat wherever I seem to go fishing. At least that's my excuse from now on.

Old 06-11-2019, 03:20 PM
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Its a naturally occurring phenomenon greatly exacerbated by human activity and it has some good and some bad impacts on the various fisheries. All in all its safe to say wed probably be better off with less dumping of chemicals and pollutants in the ocean.
Old 06-11-2019, 06:30 PM
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Originally Posted by jjc0009 View Post
Weird, I smashed a 5 man limit of 15+ pound snapper in that dead zone just two weeks ago....
coordinates? LOL Just kidding.
Old 06-11-2019, 06:44 PM
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Originally Posted by bluescholar View Post
Its a naturally occurring phenomenon greatly exacerbated by human activity and it has some good and some bad impacts on the various fisheries. All in all its safe to say wed probably be better off with less dumping of chemicals and pollutants in the ocean.


What pollutants are you talking about? man made fertilizer copies natural decaying matter. Mother nature makes massive amounts of fertilizer, floods tend to pick up more of the natural decaying matter.
Old 06-11-2019, 06:47 PM
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Originally Posted by bluescholar View Post
Its a naturally occurring phenomenon greatly exacerbated by human activity and it has some good and some bad impacts on the various fisheries. All in all its safe to say wed probably be better off with less dumping of chemicals and pollutants in the ocean.
Your "colleagues" specifically name it the dead zone. I see mountains of life in it.

Your "colleagues" say there is a shortage of trigger and snapper. I see more trigger and snapper than ever in my grey haired life.

I say your opinion shouldn't be dumped in the ocean either.

There was a time when Walter Cronkite gave us the straight dope, and those days are gone. Men like you can make the models say whatever you want, and you paint a "dead zone" every time or nobody would listen. We aren't buying it anymore. We are using safer pesticides, refrigerants, fertilizers and farming techniques not because an overeducated blowhard told us too, but because it makes common sense.

So go ahead and tell us again not to dump our used oil in the bay because you're changing the world. Ugh.
Old 06-12-2019, 05:17 AM
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This is simple geometry. 8,000 square miles = area. 8,000 square miles 6" thick = volume. The area calculation is more shock and awe. If we realized the dead zone was actually only a thin layer at the bottom, it becomes less newsworthy.
Old 06-12-2019, 07:48 AM
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Originally Posted by SuperDave4x4 View Post


coordinates? LOL Just kidding.
Turn around the tip of Dauphin Island and run 34.7 miles at 177.7 degrees LOL. Should get you pretty close
Old 06-12-2019, 08:03 AM
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ummm.........thats my spot!!!!!
Old 06-12-2019, 07:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Jeepman View Post
What pollutants are you talking about? man made fertilizer copies natural decaying matter. Mother nature makes massive amounts of fertilizer, floods tend to pick up more of the natural decaying matter.
mercury?

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