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28 day - Wet Aged tenderloin - Reverse seared

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28 day - Wet Aged tenderloin - Reverse seared

Old 10-07-2018, 03:08 PM
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Default 28 day - Wet Aged tenderloin - Reverse seared

Just did my 1st wet aging and it turned out amazing. No question at all that the process worked. Picked up a whole tenderloin from Sams, kept it in the original sealed packaging and placed it in the back of the fridge for 28 days past the sell by date. At 28 days I removed it from the packaging and cut into 8” long sections and sealed with a chamber vac and froze them for later.

Just took one out, cut it into two 4” thick filets and trimmed the outside. Went on the Kamodo joe at 250 for 20 min with a few chunks of hickory till they reached 120, then removed, cranked up the grill to 700 and reverse seared for 2 min on each side. What came out was absolute perfection, perfect crust on the outside and medium rare plus on the inside. Served with some blue cheese crumble and a couple lobster tails...Swear they were better than any steakhouse I’ve been to. The wet aging process is as much a game changer for me as the ceramic grill. It’s that good.


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Old 10-07-2018, 04:29 PM
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Great job! Going to try this soon.
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Old 10-07-2018, 05:03 PM
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Sounds really good. Grilled a couple of rib eyes over the campfire Friday night. Never did this before but I'm gonna do it again!
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Old 10-07-2018, 05:41 PM
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Rotten beef yum! Just kidding. Sounds amazing and I might actually try this. Doesn't take any special equipment. Just a strong stomach I guess.
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Old 10-07-2018, 05:43 PM
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I agree I love them 28 and wet.
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Old 10-08-2018, 09:10 AM
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Originally Posted by hjorgan View Post
Rotten beef yum! Just kidding. Sounds amazing and I might actually try this. Doesn't take any special equipment. Just a strong stomach I guess.

No special equipment. Just put it on the lower shelf, all the way in the back where it would stay more a consistent temp. Fridge is set at 34 degrees. I did my research on google. Many people go much longer than 28 days, but 28 is considered ideal. When unpacking there was no foul or odd smell. A strong foul odor would indicate something went wrong. I just set an alarm in my calendar. I have to admit it was tough letting a $100 piece of meat sit for that long but everything was just fine. They do the exact same thing at fancy steakhouses. You typically see Aged beef advertised. If they don't specify dry aged, then it's wet aged. There was absolutely no question that it worked. The results were incredible. This process is best done with primal cuts (large cuts like whole tenderloins in the thick cryovac packaging)


We plan to build a new lake home in a couple years, and I'm planning to give dry aging a go and want to install one of these as a showpiece!

https://www.dry-ager.com/en/


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Old 10-08-2018, 01:47 PM
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wet aging whole tenderloins does not make a ton of sense in my opinion - it is already a very tender cut and so aging to make it even more tender ends up pushing it into the Omaha steak realm (not good at all IMO) and you end up eating something that is almost devoid of beef texture. Also wet aging whole tenderloins in that much blood (there is typically a lot of blood in cryo'd tenderloins) results in a very mineral-y taste and smell - not necessarily bad but not preferred by many. I guess the best thing that can be said about wet aging is no loss of meat unlike dry aging. I am also struggling with your decision to wet age for 28 days and then freeze the whole thing rather than cooking/eating. It seems to me that there is going to be enzyme and bactiue

Also you should join Costco as much of their beef is offered in prime cuts- last time I checked Sams beer is all choice.....
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Old 10-09-2018, 08:41 AM
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Here u go.
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Old 10-09-2018, 09:02 AM
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Looks amazing. I assume you could do the same with a rib loin?
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Old 10-09-2018, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by NC Mike View Post
Looks amazing. I assume you could do the same with a rib loin?
Absolutely, just get a large whole primal cut in cryovac and let her sit in the fridge. There are companies that sell large wet aging bags made specifically for this but it much easier to just find them already sealed. Try it and let me know what you think. I won’t go back now after trying this.


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Old 10-09-2018, 03:12 PM
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Originally Posted by sclancy View Post
wet aging whole tenderloins does not make a ton of sense in my opinion - it is already a very tender cut and so aging to make it even more tender ends up pushing it into the Omaha steak realm (not good at all IMO) and you end up eating something that is almost devoid of beef texture. Also wet aging whole tenderloins in that much blood (there is typically a lot of blood in cryo'd tenderloins) results in a very mineral-y taste and smell - not necessarily bad but not preferred by many. I guess the best thing that can be said about wet aging is no loss of meat unlike dry aging. I am also struggling with your decision to wet age for 28 days and then freeze the whole thing rather than cooking/eating. It seems to me that there is going to be enzyme and bactiue

Also you should join Costco as much of their beef is offered in prime cuts- last time I checked Sams beer is all choice.....
Can’t remember what was going on around day 28 but I recall being too busy to cook it so it was frozen after sealing with a Vacmaster chamber vac. I would agree with you on dry aging a tenderloin but not wet aging. All of the biggest and most popular steakhouses age their beef, including tenderloins so cant say I’d agree with you about it not being preferred by many. What turned out was as good if not better than any steakhouse. A tenderloin straight out of the package is tender but it just isn’t the same as an aged one, I’m now certain of that. There’s a place in Tampa called master purveyors that has over 20 different types of beef tenderloin. The place is amazing.

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Old 10-09-2018, 03:24 PM
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IMO the vacuum did more to your meat than sitting in the fridge for 28 days. Ths vac pulled water from the meat and concentrated the flavor. The sear was enhanced because of the reducfion in moisture. Try unpacking the loin and setting in the fridge, thereby drying, for 15 days, then vac for 15 to redisteibute the juices, then do your sear again. On top of that, Sam's sells pretty good loins.
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Old 10-10-2018, 09:44 AM
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Originally Posted by sclancy View Post
wet aging whole tenderloins does not make a ton of sense in my opinion - it is already a very tender cut and so aging to make it even more tender ends up pushing it into the Omaha steak realm (not good at all IMO) and you end up eating something that is almost devoid of beef texture. Also wet aging whole tenderloins in that much blood (there is typically a lot of blood in cryo'd tenderloins) results in a very mineral-y taste and smell - not necessarily bad but not preferred by many. I guess the best thing that can be said about wet aging is no loss of meat unlike dry aging. I am also struggling with your decision to wet age for 28 days and then freeze the whole thing rather than cooking/eating. It seems to me that there is going to be enzyme and bactiue

Also you should join Costco as much of their beef is offered in prime cuts- last time I checked Sams beer is all choice.....
A couple of things in here that are worth expanding on.

It is not blood in the packing. It is myoglobin and does not contribute to either the smell or taste in the same way that actual blood does.

When you dry age, you don't lose meat. You do lose water, but not meat.

Freezing would most likely kill off bacteria, not exacerbate the problem.

Most beef is wet aged to some degree - the time it spends in the cryo from the processor to your home all counts as wet age time.
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Old 10-10-2018, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by airbrush View Post
IMO the vacuum did more to your meat than sitting in the fridge for 28 days. Ths vac pulled water from the meat and concentrated the flavor. The sear was enhanced because of the reducfion in moisture. Try unpacking the loin and setting in the fridge, thereby drying, for 15 days, then vac for 15 to redisteibute the juices, then do your sear again. On top of that, Sam's sells pretty good loins.
No.....

I'm not sure why he opened the cryo bag it came in just to reseal it - but he just vacuum sealed it in another bag. If he hadn't frozen it he would just be wet aging it further.

When you dry age (like you say in the fridge) the meat on the outside becomes desiccated. Resealing in a vac bag isn't going to rehydrate that portion of the meat - it is trimmed prior to cooking.
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Old 10-10-2018, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by OffshoreApparel.com View Post


Absolutely, just get a large whole primal cut in cryovac and let her sit in the fridge. There are companies that sell large wet aging bags made specifically for this but it much easier to just find them already sealed. Try it and let me know what you think. I won’t go back now after trying this.


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Are you referring to the Umai bags?
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Old 10-10-2018, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by MattGoose View Post
Are you referring to the Umai bags?
Those are dry age bags. There are some very big vac bags out there already cut to size that will hold an entire rib/strip loin if desired. Popular with folks that order sides of beef and home butcher them.

For instance Uline sells them up to 24x36". They are a bit different than foodsaver bags, as they don't have the texturing those do to assist with vacuuming.

https://www.uline.com/BL_5563/Vacuum...cuum+Food+Bags
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Old 10-10-2018, 10:21 AM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
Those are dry age bags. There are some very big vac bags out there already cut to size that will hold an entire rib/strip loin if desired. Popular with folks that order sides of beef and home butcher them.

For instance Uline sells them up to 24x36". They are a bit different than foodsaver bags, as they don't have the texturing those do to assist with vacuuming.

https://www.uline.com/BL_5563/Vacuum...cuum+Food+Bags
But those are just vacuum bags, right?

I mean, there's nothing special about them that makes them for wet aging?
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Old 10-10-2018, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by MattGoose View Post
But those are just vacuum bags, right?

I mean, there's nothing special about them that makes them for wet aging?
Correct. Some of the home butchering/self sufficiency supply sites advertise them as wet age bags though. Can't point you to one right off, but have seen them in the past and chuckled.
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Old 10-10-2018, 11:22 AM
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Is the cryo that y'all keep referring to just the packaging that the meat is in when you buy it at the grocery store or costco?
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Old 10-10-2018, 11:50 AM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
Correct. Some of the home butchering/self sufficiency supply sites advertise them as wet age bags though. Can't point you to one right off, but have seen them in the past and chuckled.
OK, fair enough

Thanks!
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