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Sous Vide Container Bag Holder

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Old 02-06-2018, 06:10 AM
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Default Sous Vide Container Bag Holder

Here is a sous vide bag holder I have been using that works really well. It is made from an Ikea stainless steel pod lid organizer. By itself the organizer works fine. The accordion style allows you to adjust it to fit your container and bag width.

The addition of some 1/4 inch I.D. tubing from your local hardware store make is even more useful. I used a heat gun to soften the tip of the tubing so it would stretch over the tips at each end of the organizer. I made sure the length of tubing I used created a handle that would sit just below the lid of either my 12 quart cambro style sous vide container or the 24 quart Coleman stacker cooler that I use for longer cooks.

I added a 3rd length of tubing that I fastened to one handle tight with a zip tie. I made the length so that when the organizer was stretched out fully I had enough length to wrap around the other handle. I used another zip tie put on loosely so the tubing can be squeezed in and out of it allowing me to adjust the length. This piece of tubing allows acts as a hold down across the bags to prevent them from floating up.

Using this setup I am able to arrange all the bags at once outside the hot water bath, fasten them in place, and then lower them in all at once. It also allows me to remove them all at once. The tubing handles are cooler than the stainless steel to the touch and are much more comfortable to grab in 150 F water quickly with bare fingers.

Organizer from Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TJTWR04...iglink20417-20
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Old 02-06-2018, 06:30 AM
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Very nice. Just pulled the trigger on a cooker, and added one of these to the order. Have a bigger cook coming up Saturday that the crock pot wasn't going to work for. Hoping to make use of it along with the crock pot setup to be able to do proteins and veggies at the same time at 2 different temps.

This is the cooker I ordered. They sell the same thing at Sam's and it has great reviews. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

PS: Great boat. I had a Pulse 1800 from 2005 - 2016. Only sold it because I needed something with better seating options and toddler containment.

Last edited by autobaun70; 02-06-2018 at 09:36 AM. Reason: Forgot link
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Old 02-06-2018, 08:58 AM
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I almost bought a similar one as well but ended up with the one I have because I preferred the removable mount over the fixed clip. Not an issue with the Rubbermaid/Cambar style containers or a pot, but it doesn't work as well with the cooler setup.

The Sams unit looks nice and comes with a divider as well. I am sure it will work great because these are pretty simple units without wifi or Bluetooth.

Hope the lid organizer works out as well. I had seen the Ikea recommended on Amazon and just ordered with the cooker. Then I saw a more expensive bag holder that looked similar to the Ikea one but it had handles. That's where I came up with the idea to add the tubing. I was also having problems with some of my bags wanting to float so I was able to address that as well.

Good Luck with the cook! Will be looking for pics!

I have owed my McKee Pulse since 2000 and love it. Very capable boat offshore for its size and it is still a good family/ICW boat.
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Old 02-09-2018, 07:41 AM
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Got in my cooker. Haven't cooked with it, but did a test run in water to get a feel for it. Super simple controls, and it holds temp well. It took cold tap water at just below 50 degrees to 150 in about 20 minutes (roughly 2 gallons). Then tried it using hot tap water (right at 120 degrees), and it got it from 120 to 165 (poultry temp) in under 10 minutes. Definitely looking forward to having this as an addition to the kitchen arsenal. Also got in the ikea divider you posted. Should work really well.
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Old 02-09-2018, 02:39 PM
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That seems pretty quick. My water usually starts around 115 - 120 is and it seems like it take 20 - 30 minutes for mine to get to 150ish. I will have to time mine next time.

Check out the Joule app. It gives you a visual guide to temp and time. Also check out the Serious Eats Sous Vide guide: http://www.seriouseats.com/tags/sous%20vide

I have found for the thicker fillets from Costo that 150 for 1.5 hours was good. I believe the Joule app says 149 for 1.5 hours. No reason to go to 165, meat will still get pasteurized. Read the Serious Eats chicken guide for an explanation.

http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/07/t...en-breast.html

Good luck with you cook.
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Old 02-09-2018, 03:12 PM
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Originally Posted by rldraugh View Post
That seems pretty quick. My water usually starts around 115 - 120 is and it seems like it take 20 - 30 minutes for mine to get to 150ish. I will have to time mine next time.

Check out the Joule app. It gives you a visual guide to temp and time. Also check out the Serious Eats Sous Vide guide: http://www.seriouseats.com/tags/sous%20vide

I have found for the thicker fillets from Costo that 150 for 1.5 hours was good. I believe the Joule app says 149 for 1.5 hours. No reason to go to 165, meat will still get pasteurized. Read the Serious Eats chicken guide for an explanation.

http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/07/t...en-breast.html

Good luck with you cook.
Awesome. Have you ever done any sous vide in advance, and then refrigerated until needed? I have 3 boneless thighs going now, which won’t be eaten tonight.
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Old 02-12-2018, 05:32 AM
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I have not done it in advance but a lot of the articles talk about using an ice bath to quickly chill it and leaving it in the bag and storing in the refrigerator to finish off later. By keeping it sealed you are not exposing it to any bacteria and by using a ice bath you bringing it down through the danger zone quickly.Seems like a good idea.

One of the articles talked about doing chicken breasts with different seasonings all at once in separate bags to finish off for different meals during the week. Makes sense, I just have not got around to giving it a try.

How did your cook go over the weekend?
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Old 02-12-2018, 05:44 AM
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Originally Posted by rldraugh View Post
I have not done it in advance but a lot of the articles talk about using an ice bath to quickly chill it and leaving it in the bag and storing in the refrigerator to finish off later. By keeping it sealed you are not exposing it to any bacteria and by using a ice bath you bringing it down through the danger zone quickly.Seems like a good idea.

One of the articles talked about doing chicken breasts with different seasonings all at once in separate bags to finish off for different meals during the week. Makes sense, I just have not got around to giving it a try.

How did your cook go over the weekend?
Makes sense. Hadn't thought about using multiple seasonings. Chicken I cooked the other night is getting finished tonight. I've read about a few different methods for doing this. Consciousness seems to be to initially warm up the chicken in hot water, and then move them to the pan for finishing. Really hoping it goes well, as we have 2 small kids currently. Quick to the table, semi healthy meals are tough to come by currently.

Cook over the weekend went really well. Creme Brulee came out excellent, as did the steak. While sous vide really works well with a high end steak, I think it really benefits a run of the mill steak more. With higher end meat, to me the true benefit is a much lower chance of screwing it up. With run of the mill stuff, you can tell a big difference in the tenderness of the meat if you give it a good bit of time in the water, say 3-4 hours.
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Old 02-12-2018, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
Got in my cooker. Haven't cooked with it, but did a test run in water to get a feel for it. Super simple controls, and it holds temp well. It took cold tap water at just below 50 degrees to 150 in about 20 minutes (roughly 2 gallons). Then tried it using hot tap water (right at 120 degrees), and it got it from 120 to 165 (poultry temp) in under 10 minutes. Definitely looking forward to having this as an addition to the kitchen arsenal. Also got in the ikea divider you posted. Should work really well.
No such thing as poultry temp anymore


Check the Serious Eats guide to chicken, 150 or so for the best chicken you've ever had
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Old 02-12-2018, 06:26 PM
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So I finished some chicken thighs that I cooked in the sous vide late last week. Cooked some onions, pulled them, then seared the chicken, and returned the onions to the pan to steam them to temp. They came out good, but simply reheating whole in the pan is way too slow to achieve my goal of in the table in 20 min or less. Going to try again and slice them first next time. Perhaps give them a sear, pull and slice, and return to the pan. May also play around with some heat supplementation from the microwave prior to hitting the pan. As juicy as they are, I have to think they will be pretty durable in that regard.
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Old 02-13-2018, 08:01 AM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
So I finished some chicken thighs that I cooked in the sous vide late last week. Cooked some onions, pulled them, then seared the chicken, and returned the onions to the pan to steam them to temp. They came out good, but simply reheating whole in the pan is way too slow to achieve my goal of in the table in 20 min or less. Going to try again and slice them first next time. Perhaps give them a sear, pull and slice, and return to the pan. May also play around with some heat supplementation from the microwave prior to hitting the pan. As juicy as they are, I have to think they will be pretty durable in that regard.
I'm not yet convinced on the time shift benefit of sous vide...

I'm not sure about you, but I know with our kids right now there is plenty of time to get something started (drop a bag in hot water) and then finish while they eat or when they go to to bed.

You can knock out thighs in an hour, so would it be feasible to do them fresh rather than trying two or three ways to get them to reheat?
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Old 02-13-2018, 08:22 AM
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Originally Posted by MattGoose View Post
I'm not yet convinced on the time shift benefit of sous vide...

I'm not sure about you, but I know with our kids right now there is plenty of time to get something started (drop a bag in hot water) and then finish while they eat or when they go to to bed.

You can knock out thighs in an hour, so would it be feasible to do them fresh rather than trying two or three ways to get them to reheat?
At this point the toddler eats with us, fairly early, usually between 5-6. One of the goals is to be able to group prep work together as well. Ideally if I can break down a whole package or 3 of meat, season, prep, and seal all at once.

Very well may not be the magic wand I was hoping for, however it is definitely a great tool to have in the arsenal.
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Old 02-13-2018, 08:32 AM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
At this point the toddler eats with us, fairly early, usually between 5-6. One of the goals is to be able to group prep work together as well. Ideally if I can break down a whole package or 3 of meat, season, prep, and seal all at once.

Very well may not be the magic wand I was hoping for, however it is definitely a great tool to have in the arsenal.
You've got yourself together better than we do

If you kept the thighs in one layer in the bag, you might be able to bring it back up to temp pretty quickly in the sous vide while the onions cook then sear them off in the pan?
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Old 02-13-2018, 08:39 AM
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I have a Anova Sous-Vide.
I drank the kool-aide and I couldn't wait to get one. I was going to be in cooking Utopia.
I studied the methods and science. Times and recipes.
My results so far have been meh and if I use my Thermapen MK4 and cook stuff in more traditional methods, I get very good results without all the extra effort of using the sous-vide cooker.

...and don't tell me it's not that much extra effort. It is in many cases.
I am still going to use the sous-vide and see what I can get out of it but I'm no longer an advocate.
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Old 02-13-2018, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by netjob View Post
I have a Anova Sous-Vide.
I drank the kool-aide and I couldn't wait to get one. I was going to be in cooking Utopia.
I studied the methods and science. Times and recipes.
My results so far have been meh and if I use my Thermapen MK4 and cook stuff in more traditional methods, I get very good results without all the extra effort of using the sous-vide cooker.

...and don't tell me it's not that much extra effort. It is in many cases.
I am still going to use the sous-vide and see what I can get out of it but I'm no longer an advocate.
1. What are you cooking?
2. How?
3. What did like? Not like about what you made?
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Old 02-13-2018, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by MattGoose View Post
You've got yourself together better than we do

If you kept the thighs in one layer in the bag, you might be able to bring it back up to temp pretty quickly in the sous vide while the onions cook then sear them off in the pan?
Lack of daycare is the only thing that makes it possible. My mom and MIL are the ones that make that possible. I have given serious though into reheating in hot water. I'm thinking, but don't know for sure, that it won't really matter if it is done so at a higher than desired temp, if done for a short duration.

Also may just continues to use the crock pot rig for that. Big benefit of it compared to a regular sous vide rig is that it can be set to a timer. I know neither my mom or MIL will be willing to fiddle with turning on the sous vide, but could easily toss the food in the crock pot at a particular time or another. At that point not really a big benefit of cooking ahead, other than to make the food fridge stable for a longer period of time, though that could greatly reduce the possibility of food waste.
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Old 02-13-2018, 08:56 AM
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Originally Posted by netjob View Post
I have a Anova Sous-Vide.
I drank the kool-aide and I couldn't wait to get one. I was going to be in cooking Utopia.
I studied the methods and science. Times and recipes.
My results so far have been meh and if I use my Thermapen MK4 and cook stuff in more traditional methods, I get very good results without all the extra effort of using the sous-vide cooker.

...and don't tell me it's not that much extra effort. It is in many cases.
I am still going to use the sous-vide and see what I can get out of it but I'm no longer an advocate.
Biggest benefit I have found so far is that it in many cases takes away the importance of timing and paying attention during the cook.

For instance, we did a very good ribeye a little over a week ago. Close to a $50 piece of meat. Having little kids, had a full blown diaper emergency right at time to pull it out and finish it. No big deal, handled the situation, and then finished the steak. Had I been doing reverse sear in the oven or cooking it on the grill, either the steak or the serving temp would have been greatly sacrificed.

Biggest thing I learned early on regarding a "meh" finish to a dish. When it comes out of the sous vide bag, get the meat DRY on the outside. Can't emphasize this enough. If you don't, you won't get a good finish at all.
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Old 02-13-2018, 09:16 AM
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Originally Posted by MattGoose View Post
1. What are you cooking?
2. How?
3. What did like? Not like about what you made?

So far I have cooked a few steaks and a few pork loins.

They were cooked using Anova recommended temps and times.

The steaks I cooked for 1 hour @ 133deg. I finished them off using a Weber chimney charcoal starter. Still working on that one as the steaks weren't that thick and the searing may have been better in a cast iron skillet.
Sous-vide favors a real thick steak. I can't always buy expensive cuts though.

The loins were cooked for 1 hour @ 140 deg and seared on a cast iron skillet.
Flavor was fine and it was juicy but texture felt raw.

The next time I cooked @ 145deg for 1 hour. Still seemed raw. Thermapen showed correct temperature. I seared quickly on hot propane grill this time.

I'll keep working on it to find the right settings for me but I quickly learned it isn't a fool proof method for perfection. Whatever that is.
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Old 02-13-2018, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by netjob View Post
So far I have cooked a few steaks and a few pork loins.

They were cooked using Anova recommended temps and times.

The steaks I cooked for 1 hour @ 133deg. I finished them off using a Weber chimney charcoal starter. Still working on that one as the steaks weren't that thick and the searing may have been better in a cast iron skillet.
Sous-vide favors a real thick steak. I can't always buy expensive cuts though.

The loins were cooked for 1 hour @ 140 deg and seared on a cast iron skillet.
Flavor was fine and it was juicy but texture felt raw.

The next time I cooked @ 145deg for 1 hour. Still seemed raw. Thermapen showed correct temperature. I seared quickly on hot propane grill this time.

I'll keep working on it to find the right settings for me but I quickly learned it isn't a fool proof method for perfection. Whatever that is.
For beef/pork, especially less expensive cuts, stretch out the time. I've done a lot of steaks at 3-4 hours. My go to method is to sous vide them long, and finish in a pan. To finish, I start with the fat cap, and get a lot of fat rendered off of it, along with some canola oil and butter. Finish off the edges, and then do each side.

On steak specifically, avoid doing multiple (1 per person) thinner steaks, and rather do 1 thicker steak, sliced to serve. May not be the situation, but that's how I read it. I love great steaks, but also can't do really good meat all that often without sacrificing elsewhere. My crowd (wife's family specifically) took a long time to convince that it was better to serve a lesser amount of good meat, rather than one thinner steak per person. To me, even if the portions of meat are much less, it is the way to go, and can be supplemented by vegetables, salad, etc.
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Old 02-13-2018, 10:39 AM
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Originally Posted by netjob View Post
So far I have cooked a few steaks and a few pork loins.

They were cooked using Anova recommended temps and times.

The steaks I cooked for 1 hour @ 133deg. I finished them off using a Weber chimney charcoal starter. Still working on that one as the steaks weren't that thick and the searing may have been better in a cast iron skillet.
Sous-vide favors a real thick steak. I can't always buy expensive cuts though.

The loins were cooked for 1 hour @ 140 deg and seared on a cast iron skillet.
Flavor was fine and it was juicy but texture felt raw.

The next time I cooked @ 145deg for 1 hour. Still seemed raw. Thermapen showed correct temperature. I seared quickly on hot propane grill this time.

I'll keep working on it to find the right settings for me but I quickly learned it isn't a fool proof method for perfection. Whatever that is.
Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
For beef/pork, especially less expensive cuts, stretch out the time. I've done a lot of steaks at 3-4 hours. My go to method is to sous vide them long, and finish in a pan. To finish, I start with the fat cap, and get a lot of fat rendered off of it, along with some canola oil and butter. Finish off the edges, and then do each side.

On steak specifically, avoid doing multiple (1 per person) thinner steaks, and rather do 1 thicker steak, sliced to serve. May not be the situation, but that's how I read it. I love great steaks, but also can't do really good meat all that often without sacrificing elsewhere. My crowd (wife's family specifically) took a long time to convince that it was better to serve a lesser amount of good meat, rather than one thinner steak per person. To me, even if the portions of meat are much less, it is the way to go, and can be supplemented by vegetables, salad, etc.
I agree with what Autobahn says on this...

Pork tenderloin is tough... There's definitely a texture thing going on with it down that low, but the more I try it the more I like it. 150 was a good starting point for pork.

On steak, thicker is better. Roasts are great too.

On recommended cooking times, those are typically minimum cooking times. There's no harm (with most things) letting it stretch out a bit longer.

Check out the Serious Eats guide, as well as Chef Steps. Have some great guidance.

Just remember how long it took for you to get good with a grill and a thermapen!
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