Notices
Like Tree3Likes

Where to buy whole beef Briskets

Reply

Old 02-08-2017, 03:21 PM
  #21  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Raleigh/Southport, NC
Posts: 4,429
Default

Originally Posted by MattGoose View Post
Wow - you're running flats for 11-12 hours?!? Damn. A 12lb packer finished up in 12 hours for me at 250. The point end was perfect, the flat was a bit toasted.

Do you put anything in with the foil?
I'm running at a lower temp, 225 max and occasionally lower. They come out fantastic. Don't put anything in when I wrap them in the foil (they sill have most of the original brown suger-based rub on them).
jcbadabing is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2017, 07:23 AM
  #22  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,138
Default

Originally Posted by jcbadabing View Post
I'm running at a lower temp, 225 max and occasionally lower. They come out fantastic. Don't put anything in when I wrap them in the foil (they sill have most of the original brown suger-based rub on them).
Worth a try - I run across flats all the time at the grocery store but never full packers.

The flavor of the flat was great, just too dry for me.

Will give it a shot!
MattGoose is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2017, 08:02 AM
  #23  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: ocean city MD
Posts: 151
Default

i have always had luck getting mine at sams club
nposterl is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2018, 01:40 PM
  #24  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,177
Default

Bahaman, I assume you are in Alabama, but I am in Texas, on the SE coast.

I bought a very nice, whole packer brisket (~15 lbs) a couple weeks ago for $1.69 per lb. That isn't an unusual price lately, from most any major grocery here. They are always available, and Costco and Sam's here are not priced differently.

While pulled pork from a pork butt is a really good thing to eat, I do not know a single person that would consider pork butts as a substitute for brisket.



Originally Posted by Bamaman View Post
Any grocery store can order you any such cut of beef--through their wholesale supplier.

But as a southerner (and not a Texan), I'm not a brisket fan. We can buy good whole pork shoulders or boston butts for 1/4th the price of beef. And 12 hours @ 225 degrees, it melts in your mouth.
chaco is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2018, 04:18 PM
  #25  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Raleigh/Southport, NC
Posts: 4,429
Default

Originally Posted by chaco View Post
Bahaman, I assume you are in Alabama, but I am in Texas, on the SE coast.

I bought a very nice, whole packer brisket (~15 lbs) a couple weeks ago for $1.69 per lb. That isn't an unusual price lately, from most any major grocery here. They are always available, and Costco and Sam's here are not priced differently.

While pulled pork from a pork butt is a really good thing to eat, I do not know a single person that would consider pork butts as a substitute for brisket.
Dang, $1.69/lb is a great price. I ran about 50 pounds of brisket yesterday. The "packers" were $3.19/lb, the flats were $5.99/lb. Got the freezer loaded up -- should last a while, but that stuff is like crack.
jcbadabing is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2018, 06:16 AM
  #26  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Posts: 875
Default

I tried smoking briskets twice in the past and both came out pretty dry. I think I want to give it one more shot. We have a local butcher. What exactly do I need to order?
Knoxes is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2018, 06:52 AM
  #27  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Jupiter
Posts: 2,693
Default

Got all of mine at Costco.

For Christmas I cooked the whole thing (16#'er) but mostly I'll trim the flat and end up cooking two pieces. I usually start the thinner section about 3-4 hrs after the larger. Dont trim any of the fat off. I cook fatty side up the whole time.

Slow and low!!!
Tainui is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2018, 06:58 AM
  #28  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Jupiter
Posts: 2,693
Default

Originally Posted by Knoxes View Post
I tried smoking briskets twice in the past and both came out pretty dry. I think I want to give it one more shot. We have a local butcher. What exactly do I need to order?
Are you starting directly from the fridge or letting the meat reach ambient temp before you put it in the smoker?

You could try a pork shoulder first. Those are cheaper and pretty fatty. The fatty cuts are the most juicy IMO and I never trim any off. You can cut/eat around it once its finished but don't trim anything off before you cook.
Tainui is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2018, 07:47 AM
  #29  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,177
Default

Originally Posted by jcbadabing View Post
Dang, $1.69/lb is a great price. I ran about 50 pounds of brisket yesterday. The "packers" were $3.19/lb, the flats were $5.99/lb. Got the freezer loaded up -- should last a while, but that stuff is like crack.
Yeah, brisket is so popular around here that there is a large supply. That price is not for a prime level cut of meat.
.
chaco is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2018, 07:50 AM
  #30  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Amongst the FL fishies
Posts: 6,475
Default

Originally Posted by JW5050 View Post
Hey guys,

Just wondering where you BBQ guys ususally buy whole beef briskets from? I had ordered a case of them from a local SAMs club (75-80 pounds) total. It was listed on their website, but I was emailed shortly after saying that my order was cancelled due to them no longer carrying whole briskets.
I dont necissarily need a whole case, this was a one time big order for a group of friends who all were looking.
Anyway, it doesnt seem like butchers or supermarkets around here carry whole briskets, just wondering about ordering online and where you all order from!
Thank you!!
Jim
I just bought a couple whole briskets from Sam's Club about two week ago.
airbrush is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2018, 05:04 PM
  #31  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Raleigh/Southport, NC
Posts: 4,429
Default

Originally Posted by Knoxes View Post
I tried smoking briskets twice in the past and both came out pretty dry. I think I want to give it one more shot. We have a local butcher. What exactly do I need to order?
Did you smoke flats (the thinner half of the brisket) or "packers" (the thicker half)? You need to be a bit more careful with the flats as they don't have as much fat content. Unless your smoker is set on blast furnace it should be hard to dry out a packer half as the fat content is so high -- usually a hard fat cap and a thick layer of soft fat in the middle. Smoke for 7 hours at 225 (no higher!), then double-wrap in foil and smoke for another few hours until done.
jcbadabing is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2018, 10:16 AM
  #32  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,138
Default

Originally Posted by jcbadabing View Post
Did you smoke flats (the thinner half of the brisket) or "packers" (the thicker half)? You need to be a bit more careful with the flats as they don't have as much fat content. Unless your smoker is set on blast furnace it should be hard to dry out a packer half as the fat content is so high -- usually a hard fat cap and a thick layer of soft fat in the middle. Smoke for 7 hours at 225 (no higher!), then double-wrap in foil and smoke for another few hours until done.
Just a quick clarification....

A whole brisket is known colloquially as a packer.

A whole brisket is made up of two muscles, the flat and the point.

The line of fat in in the packer is what separates the flat from the point.

Good luck!
chaco likes this.
MattGoose is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2018, 10:50 AM
  #33  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Posts: 875
Default

Originally Posted by jcbadabing View Post
Did you smoke flats (the thinner half of the brisket) or "packers" (the thicker half)? You need to be a bit more careful with the flats as they don't have as much fat content. Unless your smoker is set on blast furnace it should be hard to dry out a packer half as the fat content is so high -- usually a hard fat cap and a thick layer of soft fat in the middle. Smoke for 7 hours at 225 (no higher!), then double-wrap in foil and smoke for another few hours until done.
Pretty sure it was a packer - I think it was at least 12 lbs. My guess is that I trimmed off too much fat, but I was following directions from another site. My smoker will hold at 225F, and I have a Maverick thermometer. I remember that it stalled for a really long time and I think I gave up after a few hours (probably totaling 18 or so - definitely overnight). I did not wrap it. So, the lack of fat content and stalling is probably what ruined it.
Knoxes is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2018, 12:46 PM
  #34  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Jupiter
Posts: 2,693
Default

Originally Posted by Knoxes View Post
Pretty sure it was a packer - I think it was at least 12 lbs. My guess is that I trimmed off too much fat, but I was following directions from another site. My smoker will hold at 225F, and I have a Maverick thermometer. I remember that it stalled for a really long time and I think I gave up after a few hours (probably totaling 18 or so - definitely overnight). I did not wrap it. So, the lack of fat content and stalling is probably what ruined it.
My Christmas was 18 hrs for 18 lbs @ 150*. I wrapped after a few hours of stall at 160* and cooked a few more hours to finish it off up to 185*. Takes a loooooong time but so worth it in the end.
Tainui is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2018, 12:49 PM
  #35  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Raleigh/Southport, NC
Posts: 4,429
Default

Originally Posted by MattGoose View Post
Just a quick clarification....

A whole brisket is known colloquially as a packer.

A whole brisket is made up of two muscles, the flat and the point.

The line of fat in in the packer is what separates the flat from the point.

Good luck!
Thanks for the clarification, was never sure what the thicker part was called. I just called it a heart attack on a plate.
jcbadabing is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2018, 06:58 AM
  #36  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,138
Default

Originally Posted by Knoxes View Post
Pretty sure it was a packer - I think it was at least 12 lbs. My guess is that I trimmed off too much fat, but I was following directions from another site. My smoker will hold at 225F, and I have a Maverick thermometer. I remember that it stalled for a really long time and I think I gave up after a few hours (probably totaling 18 or so - definitely overnight). I did not wrap it. So, the lack of fat content and stalling is probably what ruined it.
I'd argue that getting a brisket that is moist all around is one of the harder things to consistently do in BBQ.

No other cut of meat (that I'm aware of) is actually two cuts in one, has such massive variation in thickness from one end to the other and is comprised of two muscles with massively different fat contents.

Getting a nicely done brisket is a combo of time, specific piece of meat, cook temp and tech that all happen to work out together.

A lot of people cook brisket based on when the flat is done and then make burnt ends out of the point. I'd also say that sometimes the flat isn't actually dry - it just seems so in comparison to the incredibly moist point.

One thing that I've found helpful for all BBQ is an extended rest in an insulated cooler - a couple hours for it to all settle back in is amazing. Time for all the juices to redistribute or something, I don't know. But a nice long rest is the single biggest piece of advice that I would give.

Alllllllllllllllll of that being said - beef short ribs give you a very, very similar taste and texture but are much, much easier to get consistently right.
chaco and StateRoad42 like this.
MattGoose is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2018, 09:58 AM
  #37  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 160
Default

Every Daytona 500 we do short ribs for this exact reason. We have folks over and cook a ton of 'em. They cook faster, easier and come out like marshmallow burnt ends. Absolutely love 'em. Sams in FL usually carries points and flats. I've never seen a full packer at my local one in two years. I asked once and the butcher said he would try and order one but neither of us followed up on it. I like to cook brisket a few times a year just to remind myself I can. Publix will special order them for you at a premium.
StateRoad42 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2018, 08:57 AM
  #38  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,138
Default

Originally Posted by StateRoad42 View Post
Every Daytona 500 we do short ribs for this exact reason. We have folks over and cook a ton of 'em. They cook faster, easier and come out like marshmallow burnt ends. Absolutely love 'em. Sams in FL usually carries points and flats. I've never seen a full packer at my local one in two years. I asked once and the butcher said he would try and order one but neither of us followed up on it. I like to cook brisket a few times a year just to remind myself I can. Publix will special order them for you at a premium.
I'm curious if I have my terminology wrong?

These were big, came on multiple ribs and were amazing.

Not what I would call a traditional short rib?

Don't know - love short ribs too. But I think these were called beef plate ribs? I don't know
MattGoose is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2018, 09:06 AM
  #39  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 160
Default

Originally Posted by MattGoose View Post
I'm curious if I have my terminology wrong?

These were big, came on multiple ribs and were amazing.

Not what I would call a traditional short rib?

Don't know - love short ribs too. But I think these were called beef plate ribs? I don't know
I could be wrong on the terminology as well. But the ones I typically find come three to a pack cut with bone in. A lot of short ribs are removed from the bone and cut crosswise as opposed to lengthwise (when they are on menus etc). I like the ones that are longways and bone in. Could be plate ribs but they’re packaged as “shorts” round here.
StateRoad42 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2018, 10:10 AM
  #40  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,177
Default

I didn't realize the packer cut briskets were such a local thing. They are in very store here, all through the year.

I looked over some at a Kroger last week that were priced at $1.89/lb and the ones in the case ran 14 to 17 pounds.

I cook ribs of various types fairly often, and they too are common and low cost meats around here. What we see most are racks of ribs.

The cooking for ribs is not like the low heat smoking of a brisket. I do ribs on low temp (225-250) smoker as well, but the time needed is 3 or 4 hours, not 8 to 12. While keeping them warm in a cooler box is a good way to serve them, it is not considered part of the cooking process, like it is for the brisket cut.
chaco is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: