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I need a Neopolitan pizza crust recipe. UPDATED TO INCLUDE A REVIEW OF THE OVEN.

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I need a Neopolitan pizza crust recipe. UPDATED TO INCLUDE A REVIEW OF THE OVEN.

Old 05-09-2019, 09:45 AM
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Default I need a Neopolitan pizza crust recipe. UPDATED TO INCLUDE A REVIEW OF THE OVEN.

I just ordered a gas-fired pizza oven, which should be here in a few days. Supposed to get to 900+ degrees.
Anybody have a good recipe for a Neopolitan-style pizza crust?
I know I can get one online, but I thought I would reach out to THT to see if anybody has one they like and are willing to share.
I'm also open to general suggestions in terms using a pizza oven.
I've been eyeing these things up for a while and am pretty excited to give it a try.
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Last edited by superjag; 05-30-2019 at 09:40 AM.
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Old 05-10-2019, 04:01 AM
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This is the one I use. There is a recipe for the whole bag on the flour.

https://www.cento.com/recipes/pizza/...dough_ball.php
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Old 05-10-2019, 05:52 AM
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Originally Posted by UT_VOLS13 View Post
This is the one I use. There is a recipe for the whole bag on the flour.

https://www.cento.com/recipes/pizza/...dough_ball.php
Thanks. I will give that one a try.
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Old 05-10-2019, 08:22 AM
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What did you get for an oven?

Good luck with it
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Old 05-10-2019, 10:06 AM
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Originally Posted by superjag View Post
I just ordered a gas-fired pizza oven, which should be here in a few days. Supposed to get to 900+ degrees.
Anybody have a good recipe for a Neopolitan-style pizza crust?
I know I can get one online, but I thought I would reach out to THT to see if anybody has one they like and are willing to share.
I'm also open to general suggestions in terms using a pizza oven.
I've been eyeing these things up for a while and am pretty excited to give it a try.
We've tried a bunch, and this one is right up there. Doubly so because it's easy and you can do it in the afternoon.

Only ones that I have had that are better were cold fermented.
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Old 05-12-2019, 05:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Speedy Too View Post
What did you get for an oven?

Good luck with it
Roccbox. A buddy has one, and it is pretty great. Only real downside is you can't make pizzas bigger than 12", but with 90 second cook times, everybody can have their own pizza anyway.
It's supposed to be here tomorrow, and I'll try and post a full review when I have had a chance to use it a bit.
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Old 05-13-2019, 03:17 AM
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Thanks
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Old 05-14-2019, 02:38 PM
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This one is my favorite. I add a little more salt. Enjoy the new tool!

Tips to make the best homemade pizza crust
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Old 05-14-2019, 03:03 PM
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Neapolitan pizza dough has 4 ingredients, no more, no less.
If it's not these 4, you're doing it wrong. If you see ones that have oil or sugar....run.
- water
- yeast
- salt
- flour

I have spent many years perfecting this style dough...I can give you a starting point but I'm not posting it in this thread. PM me and I'll get you started on the right path.
Caputo 00 is a great flour, as is King Arthur bread flour...the former being in true Neapolitan style. You could honestly go down the rabbit hole on flours alone.

The only oil I use is to wipe down my containers I store the dough for the cold rise.
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Old 05-14-2019, 03:12 PM
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Originally Posted by 25WildBlue View Post
Neapolitan pizza dough has 4 ingredients, no more, no less.
If it's not these 4, you're doing it wrong. If you see ones that have oil or sugar....run.
- water
- yeast
- salt
- flour

I have spent many years perfecting this style dough...I can give you a starting point but I'm not posting it in this thread. PM me and I'll get you started on the right path.
Caputo 00 is a great flour, as is King Arthur bread flour...the former being in true Neapolitan style. You could honestly go down the rabbit hole on flours alone.

The only oil I use is to wipe down my containers I store the dough for the cold rise.
I'll never understand how some people can be secretive about a recipe, especially something like dough. take the recipe to your death that will show them
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Old 05-14-2019, 04:50 PM
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Originally Posted by BST24351 View Post
I'll never understand how some people can be secretive about a recipe, especially something like dough. take the recipe to your death that will show them
You do realize no single cook book in the world actually has exact recipes, right? Nobody who works hundreds of hours on something puts it out there. Always leave out one ingredient, one measurement a bit light/heavy. Just the way it works.
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Old 05-14-2019, 05:26 PM
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Originally Posted by TorFed View Post
You do realize no single cook book in the world actually has exact recipes, right? Nobody who works hundreds of hours on something puts it out there. Always leave out one ingredient, one measurement a bit light/heavy. Just the way it works.
I call bullshit on that. I'm sure it happens but not all the time. I've never read a cook book in my life so I dont really care. If I'm looking for something new to make I'll browse the web to get an idea on flavors to used and make my own recipe based of several I liked. I'm sure you mix flour water yeast and salt so good the gods float down to have a slice.

btw I share my fishing spots too so I guess I'm a different breed then the hull truth
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Old 05-14-2019, 06:15 PM
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I never said I wouldn’t share. I said I’m not posting it.
its only 4 ingredients but one of the best things I learned, from years of tinkering, is the process matters far more than the ingredients. I can make a great dough from ap flour because of the process alone.

I can give somone exact coordinates to fish on that I can almost guarantee holds fish. Or I can teach you what to look for on a chart, how to use your electronics, and what to look for on your sonar. Maybe you’ll take that knowledge and find your own spots, that far exceed anything I knew about.

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Old 05-16-2019, 05:45 AM
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https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/...as-pizza-dough

this one is EXCELLENT
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Old 05-16-2019, 07:04 PM
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The night before make a poolish...

Mix
500 grams of water (95 degrees)
500 grams of flour (caputo 00 pizzeria)
0.4 grams of yeast

Cover and let sit overnight. The next morning, the poolish should be bubbly and increased 2-3 times in volume

Mix
20 grams of fine sea salt with 125 grams of water (105 degrees)
500 grams of flour (caputo 00 pizzeria)
Poolish

Mix until ingredients come together
Perform 4 stretch and folds within the first hour. (Google this process)
Shape into a ball, cover, and let bulk ferment until doubled
Divide into 250 gram balls (for a 12” pizza) and shape then place in lightly oiled containers or bags
Let rest for 3 hours, or for a more developed flavor, refrigerate overnight. Remove balls from the refrigerator 2 hours before making pizza

I built a wood fired oven about 15 years ago and make pizza almost every weekend. I’ve tried many recipes and the only one I prefer over this uses a sourdough starter instead of commercial yeast.

The ingredients for great pizza is simple. The workflow and technique for mixing and shaping the dough takes a lot of practice.

Regarding the flour, if you use regular malted flour at true Neapolitan temperatures (900 degrees), chances are the dough will burn before the toppings are cooked properly. You really need Caputo 00 or a similar unmalted flour to cook at these high temperatures. Once you get the process down, you’re rewarded with a pizza that melts in your mouth.

I only use a maximum of 3 ingredients, including the cheese. This style dough is too delicate to support any more then that.

Last edited by twollman; 05-16-2019 at 07:10 PM.
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Old 05-17-2019, 10:48 AM
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I am no expert, this is not the correct way..but did have a pizza restaurant 1985 for a short time and still learning for home use. I still make dough...love to make pizza or anything Italian..actually made some last night.

I make it all in my Kitchen Aid Pro 600. No mess and if done correctly no mess in the bowl.

I start w 3 cups of 00 Cuputo flour...blue bag...drop in the bowl.
I grab some warm tap water..3/4-1 cup...preferable 105-110 degrees and drop in a bag of yeast...mix for a minute or so until frothy. let sit for 5 - 10 min. on the side
add 2 teaspoons of sugar to flour mix and start on #2 mix
I add in yeast solution and keep mixing
add sea salt to the mixture and add up to 1 more cup of flour slowly and water according.
The bowl should come clean...nothing on the sides after about 4 min of mixing. Dough should feel like a soft Booby..lol
I then cover w cheese cloth for about 3-4 hours.

It should yield about 42 oz or 3 14 oz dough balls for what I am doing tonight. Large 16-18" thin and crispy with a slight flop
I weigh each one roll them and put on a pan drizzled w EVO...and cover

The gran kids love them...they even help me...We sometimes make breakfast pizzas..or if I smoke some pulled pork i will make a tangy white sauce w vinegar and different cheese and stuff like pepperchinis..
enjoy and have fun...make some memories

I apologize for the big pics




Last edited by Jassman; 05-17-2019 at 03:19 PM.
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Old 05-30-2019, 09:39 AM
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Ok, I wanted to come back to this thread because I said I would review the pizza oven once I had a chance to use it a bit.
The oven I bought is called a Roccbox. I had done a bunch of research prior to buying it, and this one seemed have the features I was looking for (900+ degree cooking temps, stone floor, easy-to-use) and had almost universally positive reviews. Here is a picture of the box in which it arrived:


It was really well packed. You can see the two burners in this picture, one for gas, one for wood-burning. It also came with a really nice aluminum pizza peel that you can't see in the photo, as I had to remove it to show you the burners.



Set up was a breeze. It took about 3 minutes. You unfold the legs and attach whichever burner you want to use by screwing it on to the bottom.



Once it was all set up, it was just a matter of hooking up the propane tank and firing it up. This is where I ran into my first and only glitch. The burner ignites via a piezo-style igniter like a gas grill. On my burner, it took maybe 10 "clicks" of the knob to get the burner to light. When I pulled the burner off to look at it, I noticed that the probe for the igniter (where the spark comes out) was bent pretty close to the metal of the burner (like almost touching). I sent an email to the manufactured explaining what was happening and what I was seeing, and within the hour I had received a response confirming that the probe was probably too close. I bent the probe so it was a bit farther away (maybe 1/2" or so), and after that it lit flawlessly every time I clicked the knob. Here is a picture of the oven with the burner going.



They recommend that when you first get the oven, you run it for about 30 minutes on the lowest setting to help cure the oven, so I did that.
The next day I tried cooking in it. I used a recipe for the crust which was included in the recipe book which came with it. It is very similar to the recipe posted by Jassman. It took about 30 minutes for the oven to preheat.
After 30 minutes the temp gauge on the side of the oven read 950 degrees, and my infrared thermometer said it was actually closer to 975. The first pizza took about 80 seconds to cook. I actually had to turn the oven down a bit, as I barely had time to get the pizza in and get it turned once before the crust was getting pretty charred. Once I turned the burner down to about 3/4, the pizzas were taking a bit longer (just under 2 minutes) to cook, but it seemed like a much better balance in terms of charring the crust and making sure the ingredients were cooking nicely. The first picture below is the 3rd pizza I made, and by then I was getting a pretty good handle on it. Ignore the fact that there is only salami on one half of the pizza, it's what my son requested. The second picture is a spinach and artichoke heart pizza that my wife wanted. Both turned out really well I think.






I am still going through a bit of a learning curve in terms of making pizzas, but my learning is related to making pizza in general, like learning how to stretch the dough, using enough cornmeal to get the raw pizza to slide off the peel, etc., and is not really related to the oven itself.
As of today, I have made maybe 12 pizzas in this thing, and I'm going to say that it is pretty awesome. It seems really well constructed, and the only cleaning or maintenance which is required is to pull the burner off every few uses and just make sure there isn't any food stuck to it or in it. You don't have to clean the floor of the oven, as it gets so hot that it just burns itself spotless. A pepperoni fell off one of the pizzas when I was putting in the oven, and in about 30 seconds it was completely gone. There was just a tiny pile of gray ash where it had been. The outside of the oven is silicone, so it gets hot, but you can bump it or brush up against it without burning yourself. Also, you can apparently do steaks and some other foods in this oven as well, although I have not tried any of those yet.

I would definitely recommend that you consider this if you are in the market for a pizza oven.
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Last edited by superjag; 05-30-2019 at 09:48 AM.
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Old 05-30-2019, 01:05 PM
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Awesome cook and great oven choice. We've been using the Uuni oven for awhile now and just added the propane attachment which changes the entire game.

Couple of things that we've learned:
1. Turn the oven down. Yup. Something in the 750-800 range gives you just a bit more time to cook without burning. Flavor profile tends more towards caramelized than burnt.
2. Suuuuuuuper light on the toppings makes it way, way easier to get it on and off the peel as does working quickly with the ingredients
3. I personally really dislike having to use corn meal - I don't love it period, and I really don't like all the scorched cornmeal on the bottom of my pizza that starts to accumulate after the first few cooks. Last time around I had good luck just using flour on the peel - I rubbed it into the peel and then gave the peel a bit of a knock to get rid of the excess. Was pretty successful at getting a nice thin layer of flour that kept everything from sticking.

Good luck!
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Old 05-30-2019, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by MattGoose View Post
Awesome cook and great oven choice. We've been using the Uuni oven for awhile now and just added the propane attachment which changes the entire game.

Couple of things that we've learned:
1. Turn the oven down. Yup. Something in the 750-800 range gives you just a bit more time to cook without burning. Flavor profile tends more towards caramelized than burnt.
2. Suuuuuuuper light on the toppings makes it way, way easier to get it on and off the peel as does working quickly with the ingredients
3. I personally really dislike having to use corn meal - I don't love it period, and I really don't like all the scorched cornmeal on the bottom of my pizza that starts to accumulate after the first few cooks. Last time around I had good luck just using flour on the peel - I rubbed it into the peel and then gave the peel a bit of a knock to get rid of the excess. Was pretty successful at getting a nice thin layer of flour that kept everything from sticking.

Good luck!
have you stuck chicken wings in it yet?
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Old 05-30-2019, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post


have you stuck chicken wings in it yet?
I haven't.... We just got the propane attachment, and it really wasn't feasible when it was always ripping along at 950.

I'd be interested to try it though. I don't know that I've ever had high heat chicken wings, and would be curious about how the skin comes out. Not much time for the fat to render out. I did a set on the Kamado with the Vortex the other day at a higher temp than normal and the skin was pretty bad. I'm not a wing expert by an stretch though!
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