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U.S. Atlantic Dolphin Fishery Management Plan

Old 03-15-2019, 09:26 AM
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Default U.S. Atlantic Dolphin Fishery Management Plan

Figured I should post this here as well U.S. Atlantic Dolphin Fishery Management Plan
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Size:  102.2 KBIn 2007, the Magnason-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSFCMA) created eight regional fishery management councils around the United States. Among them, the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council (SAFMC) is responsible for recommending and developing the fishery management plan for dolphin off eastern Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. Currently, the SAFMC is in the process of receiving public comments regarding potential changes to the fishery management plan for dolphin targeted in those areas. The Council is pursuing options to revise 13 different actions that include topics such as redefining optimum yield for dolphin, allowing adaptive management of sector annual catch limits, modifying authorized gear that may be onboard when possessing dolphin or wahoo, modifying recreational vessel trip limits, and remove the operator card requirement for the fishery. Now is your time to voice your opinion on these matters while the SAFMC is in the public scoping phase. Click here to submit your public comments regarding these matters to the SAFMC. Click here to learn more.
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Old 03-15-2019, 09:28 AM
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Dolphin Wahoo Amendment 10


Dolphin Wahoo Amendment 10

Dolphin Wahoo Amendment 10

In March 2016, the Council directed staff to begin development of a joint dolphin wahoo and snapper grouper amendment to examine different ways to allocate or share quota between the commercial and recreational sectors for dolphin and yellowtail snapper.

The Council approved the amendment for scoping hearings, which were held in August 2016. Options included a common pool allocation, a reserve category, temporary or permanent shifts in allocation, combined annual catch limits, and creating gear allocations in the commercial dolphin fishery. In December 2016, the Council considered approving the amendment, for public hearings in early 2017. Instead, the Council directed staff to continue to develop Dolphin Wahoo Amendment 10 and include an action to revise the Allowable Biological Catch Control Rule to include a carry-over provision from one fishing year to the next. The Council also directed staff to develop actions that would eliminate the operator card requirement in the Dolphin Wahoo Fishery Management Plan, revised optimum yield, and allow properly permitted vessels with gear onboard that are not authorized for use in the dolphin wahoo fishery to possess dolphin or wahoo. Consequently, the Dolphin Wahoo Fishery Management Plan actions were not approved for public hearings.

After having stopped work on the amendment until the revised MRIP data are available, the Council directed staff to start work again on the amendment with the inclusion of additional items to allow bag limit sales of dolphin for dually permitted for-hire and commercial permit holders, modify gear, bait, and training requirements in the commercial longline fishery for dolphin and wahoo to align with HMS requirements, reduce the recreational vessel limit for dolphin, revised the ACLs to accommodate new MRIP data, and revise sector allocations.

The Council will next consider Amendment 10 at the March 2019 meeting.

GET INVOLVED –
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Council Process

  • Pre-Scoping: June 2016
  • Scoping: August 2016
  • Public Hearing:
  • Final Approval:

NMFS Process

  • Secretarial Review:
  • Rule Making:
  • Implementation:
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Old 03-15-2019, 10:47 AM
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https://billfish.org/featured/dolphi...gement-update/



Dolphin Wahoo Fishery Allocation UpdateFebruary 28, 2019/in Advocacy, Featured, NewsName:  mahi.jpg
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Size:  11.1 KBThe Billfish Foundation recently submitted comments again to The South Atlantic Fisheries Management Council regarding the future management of a dolphin (mahi mahi) and wahoo fishery.

The Amendment looks to modify the management strategy for mahi-mahi that would better ensure healthy population levels into the future. Central to protecting mahi-mahi is a restriction of pelagic longline gear by not authorizing the fishery an allocation. While these fish are known to reproduce and grow quickly, it takes only a few pelagic longline vessels to fish down a species. Whereas far less of an impact is made by individual anglers fishing from either private or charter vessels. Pelagic longline vessels also have a greater range, in most cases, than a private boat or charter boats with anglers, giving them the capacity to catch many other species beyond the range of recreational fisheries.

If allowed, longline fishing would negatively impact not only recreational fishing, an important fishery to many, but other associated species. Just in Florida, within one year, over a half a million recreational fishing trips were made for mahi-mahi, which generated strong economic returns to businesses, jobs and to the state.

Authorizing a gear-based allocation strategy for mahi-mahi, which prohibits pelagic longline gear from receiving an allocation is crucial and should be approved in Amendment 10. If you would like to submit your comments please go here.

Read our official comments to the committee below.

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Old 03-15-2019, 10:49 AM
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In 2017 I was told they are going to raise the min size to 22 and boat limit to 20 in 2020 (rec anglers)
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Old 03-15-2019, 01:54 PM
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Maybe when they get dolphin to one per person with a 6 day per year open season, crowds of people will finally force politicians to rein in the "fisheries management train wreck".
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Old 03-15-2019, 06:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Grunts N Grits View Post
Maybe when they get dolphin to one per person with a 6 day per year open season, crowds of people will finally force politicians to rein in the "fisheries management train wreck".
Yep, dolphin fishing has been getting better every year.
Bigger fish and more of them in the last 20 years.

It may be what we end up with and there is no doubt the trend for the last 10 years going forward the fish are smaller and there are fewer of them. Ask anyone in the Keys or look at the tournament results in the last 10 years for that area.
Ask Piner Wahoo and see what he has to say.

Too many idiots taking 10 per person of 20 inch fish. That to include charter boats and recreational anglers.

Seen way to many boats run up to the dock with 60 peanuts.
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Old 03-15-2019, 06:35 PM
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I’ve been hearing that crap for the last 30 plus years. The amount of people who actually do that is few and far between. On top of it, there is absolutely no science to back up.any claim that the population is diminishing. People claiming it is because they’re not catching fish is not proof, or anything close to it.
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Old 03-15-2019, 07:16 PM
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Mahi are the fastest growing fish in the world and there are billions of them. That doesn't mean we should waste any, of course. But there's no way we are putting a dent into their populations, especially on the recreational side. As a pelagic offshore fish, they are constantly on the move, and their absence from a zone one year doesn't by itself mean anything. There's been no scientific data demonstrating any problem with our Western Atlantic mahi population. Further restrictions are simply unwarranted.
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Old 03-15-2019, 07:24 PM
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The only threat to Dolphin is commercial fishing. Period.
Hell you could argue there were more fish when there was no size or bag limit for recs.
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Old 03-15-2019, 09:14 PM
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I remember back when people would avoid the peanuts , now people take the whole school . The dolphin fishery has been declining for over a decade , it used to be a year round fishery , with decent size fish around . Now it's smaller schools of peanuts . Most people have no idea how good it used to be . The norm was 30-40 lb fish year round , with some larger ones around as well . If you don't see that the fishery is in trouble , you just haven't been fishing here very long .

I hope they move the minimum to at least 27 in , give those fish a chance to spawn a couple more times . A 20in fish isn't really worth cleaning anyway . In a couple of years the whole east coast would have a nice year round dolphin fishery of decent size fish , instead of the diminishing runs of fish each year

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Old 03-15-2019, 09:48 PM
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Originally Posted by jillybird View Post
Mahi are the fastest growing fish in the world and there are billions of them. That doesn't mean we should waste any, of course. But there's no way we are putting a dent into their populations, especially on the recreational side. As a pelagic offshore fish, they are constantly on the move, and their absence from a zone one year doesn't by itself mean anything. There's been no scientific data demonstrating any problem with our Western Atlantic mahi population. Further restrictions are simply unwarranted.

Yes they are the fastest growing fish , but there are less of them coming through each year , and those peanuts are being harvested by the bucket full . Doesn't take a scientist to see how big the decline in fishing has been the last decade . It's pathetic and absolutely needs to be regulated , would really be nice to have a solid fishery once again .


They do grow fast , it's amazing how big they can get when given the chance .

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Old 03-16-2019, 02:36 AM
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Step one: reduce the commercial quota and eliminate Long-Lining. Long-Lining has detrimental effects far beyond just Pelagic fish, other sea life such as turtles, sharks, and other protected species all fall victim to Long-Lining. It blows my mind that this archaic method is still used. Don't even get me started on trawling and how the shrimpers off east central florida regularly break laws without any consequences.

Before you flame me; I'm a responsible sportsman who's been fishing the atlantic for over 20 years and I've seen the decline first hand. I'm not saying we need regulations as drastic as Red Snapper... but some common sense laws would do alot of good. As recreational anglers we have a responsibility to practice sustainable fishing methods if we want this resource to be available for future generations.
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Old 03-16-2019, 06:00 AM
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The problem is what we will get is laws just like we have for ARS. We still have ignorant limits and seasons for them, even when there’s no doubt there is no shortage of them. As I already posted, I’ve been hearing the crap about all theses people keeping the “whole school” for years, but see almost zero stars vidence of it. As for dolphin being a year round fishery, that’s never been true. Yeah, there’s always a few around, but they are mainly a spring/summer fish. Always been that way, always will. I was there for the “good old days”. They weren’t any different than now.
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Old 03-16-2019, 06:01 AM
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Originally Posted by JMarkB View Post
I’ve been hearing that crap for the last 30 plus years. The amount of people who actually do that is few and far between. On top of it, there is absolutely no science to back up.any claim that the population is diminishing. People claiming it is because they’re not catching fish is not proof, or anything close to it.
Then you may better walk the docks a bit. I have 40 years of dolphin fishing experience fishing the waters off the Keys recreational, Commercial and the last 20 Charter fishing. I fish it for the prime months of June and July. Review this thread here below and you will see what many are seeing. Note in this thread the talks of limit catches of 40 to 60 fish, even pics of a charter boat to prove it. When there are over 1/2 a million trips in Florida alone per year targeting dolphin that is a lot of fish being taken.
Dolphin in the keys
As for science there is being research done right now due to the concerns and observations of many. Don Hammond a noted researcher has been tagging and studying these fish for a long time. He has noted commercial fishing pressure, rec pressure and habitat. He also observed a year with the year of young fish were very scarce.

As PJE mentioned if you have fished this fishery very long for just for more than just a few times a year it is easy to see the decline in numbers and especially size. I have fished quite a few keys Dolphin tournaments, 10 years ago it would take a well over 30 lb fish to even think about collecting a check. Today, not so much!
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Old 03-16-2019, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by JMarkB View Post
The problem is what we will get is laws just like we have for ARS. We still have ignorant limits and seasons for them, even when there’s no doubt there is no shortage of them. As I already posted, I’ve been hearing the crap about all theses people keeping the “whole school” for years, but see almost zero stars vidence of it. As for dolphin being a year round fishery, that’s never been true. Yeah, there’s always a few around, but they are mainly a spring/summer fish. Always been that way, always will. I was there for the “good old days”. They weren’t any different than now.
Well something needs to be done , otherwise it will just continue to get worse . As was mentioned above , walk the docks sometime and see for yourself . And yes , it was a year round fishery . There used to be decent sized pairs around all year , on a regular basis , but that was a long time ago .

Serious question .... Do you really think the fishing is the same as it was a decade or so ago ?
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Old 03-16-2019, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by pje View Post
Well something needs to be done , otherwise it will just continue to get worse . As was mentioned above , walk the docks sometime and see for yourself . And yes , it was a year round fishery . There used to be decent sized pairs around all year , on a regular basis , but that was a long time ago .

Serious question .... Do you really think the fishing is the same as it was a decade or so ago ?
How about 60 years ago? I've been fishing in South Florida and the Bahamas all my life and I GUARANTEE you there are not as many dolphin as there used to be. When I was a kid we would often feed the neighbors with our catch, many of which were over 30 pounds. We didn't even have outriggers. Today it's all live bait at multiple depths and kites and if we get a few good ones it's a good day.

I would be perfectly all right with a larger minimum length and a 20 per boat limit. I hope they do it.
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Old 03-16-2019, 01:05 PM
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I’d look at climate change and commercial fishing pressure before looking at rec anglers decimating the fishery.
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Old 03-16-2019, 02:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Eye8atoad View Post
I’d look at climate change and commercial fishing pressure before looking at rec anglers decimating the fishery.

The commercial PLL pressure has a lot to do with it as well , and hopefully they will do something about it , but a good portion of it is out of US waters . But something also has to be done about the way they are managed here now , because it's just not working . We are getting smaller schools of smaller fish each year , and yet most people think the fishing is good , when it's actually declining more and more each year . I hope they raise the size limit , it would be nice to catch decent size fish in the Atlantic again .
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Old 03-16-2019, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Eye8atoad View Post
I’d look at climate change and commercial fishing pressure before looking at rec anglers decimating the fishery.
I would not even go there.

The state of Florida is approaching 22 million people and many more anglers and tourist.

You might want to look at the limits of fish not open to commercial fishing. They are strict and getting tighter for reason.

Mark my words and you will see the harvest adjustments for all inshore fish to include the prolific sea trout. Don't even think a rec fishery can't be over fished unless you just moved here last week.
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Old 03-16-2019, 03:27 PM
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Post the science? Let’s see some data. I mean the seatrout were crushed by the red tide not rec anglers?
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