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72’ Viking Sinks Off Port Canaveral

Old 10-09-2018, 04:27 PM
  #41  
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Does give you another option to dewater as long as engines are running , situations can very . A small cost on a Sporty to include but I have doubts that in a situation where they are employed it turns out well for the boat . Probably provides more " Hope " then anything practical .
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Old 10-09-2018, 04:32 PM
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[QUOTE=20biminitwist;11886387]
Originally Posted by BoulderGT3 View Post
[left]


You hole one your done with this water shut off valve above. Not even a Y valve in the photo.


Gonna take some bad ass crew to maintain water levels in a bilge by pumping out bilge water with the mains.
I think it's a little better than that but it is going to take a steady state engine speed and as you point out, someone that knows how to open and close the two vales in the Goldilocks scenario. The other thing is that by the time you get water that deep in the bilge the chance of something catching and plugging a strainer is very high.

Again, I check them yearly but I don't count on them to save me. Liferaft, EPIRB, Ditch bag and I have a decent tender on the front I could get off. At least there are multiple options but the best one is to not hit anything. I've had a couple of near misses.
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Old 10-09-2018, 04:33 PM
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Originally Posted by ed d View Post
Does give you another option to dewater as long as engines are running , situations can very . A small cost on a Sporty to include but I have doubts that in a situation where they are employed it turns out well for the boat . Probably provides more " Hope " then anything practical .
agreed. Usually only one engine is plumed with a crash valve and 50/50 that’s not the one wither the catastrophic shaft tear.
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Old 10-09-2018, 05:58 PM
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[QUOTE=BoulderGT3;11886491]
Originally Posted by 20biminitwist View Post
I think it's a little better than that but it is going to take a steady state engine speed and as you point out, someone that knows how to open and close the two vales in the Goldilocks scenario. The other thing is that by the time you get water that deep in the bilge the chance of something catching and plugging a strainer is very high.

Again, I check them yearly but I don't count on them to save me. Liferaft, EPIRB, Ditch bag and I have a decent tender on the front I could get off. At least there are multiple options but the best one is to not hit anything. I've had a couple of near misses.
Crash valves are like homeland security and TSA. I just got off a plane from Mexico this morning at 2 AM. Not a very good experience at DFW but the extra measures of safety made me feel safe.

I agree with you 100%. I bet the Spencer a FUNDAY had crash valves.
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Old 10-09-2018, 06:29 PM
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Back to the original OPs post. Where is the info on this story. Have asked all around the port and no one has heard anything about this. Starting to sound like fake news.
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Old 10-09-2018, 07:52 PM
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They finished raising the boat yesterday and it was towed in. My friend headed back to Stuart from Canaveral today. He said he will post pictures from his underwater camera on his FB page in a few days.
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Old 10-10-2018, 05:32 AM
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Where did they tow the boat to,and any info on the people onboard the boat.
Please post a link to the photos here so we all can see it.
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Old 10-10-2018, 06:31 AM
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Originally Posted by BADFI$H View Post
They finished raising the boat yesterday and it was towed in. My friend headed back to Stuart from Canaveral today. He said he will post pictures from his underwater camera on his FB page in a few days.
Was it Peter?
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Old 10-10-2018, 11:24 AM
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Sub'd
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Old 10-10-2018, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
Was it Peter?
No, Mark.
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Old 10-10-2018, 04:15 PM
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Where can I purchase the salvaged boat? I have a set of Yamaha OX66s that I need a hull for...
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Old 10-11-2018, 10:54 AM
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raising a 72 foot boat in 130 ft of water in the seas and wind we had on Monday? I guess it takes a ship to do that, but still. I would like to see the pics as well. thanks.
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Old 10-11-2018, 11:48 AM
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[QUOTE=BoulderGT3;11886491]
Originally Posted by 20biminitwist View Post
I think it's a little better than that but it is going to take a steady state engine speed and as you point out, someone that knows how to open and close the two vales in the Goldilocks scenario. The other thing is that by the time you get water that deep in the bilge the chance of something catching and plugging a strainer is very high.

Again, I check them yearly but I don't count on them to save me. Liferaft, EPIRB, Ditch bag and I have a decent tender on the front I could get off. At least there are multiple options but the best one is to not hit anything. I've had a couple of near misses.
In your case I can certainly see the crash pump advantage, it might buy you time to deploy the tender and maybe get a good game plan started.
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Old 10-11-2018, 05:08 PM
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[QUOTE=mikeloew;11892020]
Originally Posted by BoulderGT3 View Post
In your case I can certainly see the crash pump advantage, it might buy you time to deploy the tender and maybe get a good game plan started.
I'm anxious to hear what's up with the 72'.

Re. the pumps. I think it's a pretty unique situation where you would use them to effect but it's purely situational. I don't want anyone in the engine room if they don't know what they're doing, the boat is pitching or if there is any risk of it going down. Get on the raft, toss the EPIRB and say good bye to the boat.
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Old 10-11-2018, 05:48 PM
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I think a better solution for a crash pump would be a pulley driven centrifugal pump off the engine, maybe with an electric clutch. Could have one both port and starboard and they could run dry with no issues. Flip a switch at the helm and you're pumping 10,000 GPH or more and virtually no maintenance if you don't use it.
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Old 10-11-2018, 06:05 PM
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Originally Posted by fireisland1 View Post
Let’s just say you are 20 miles out and you slam something. The bilge pumps can’t keep up so you open the crash pump valves. Now your engines are keeping up enough. So they start sucking air waiting for more water. Not you burnt up both pumps. Engines are now shut down. I don’t see how this set up helps. Unless someone is in the bilge actually closing valves which would be very dangerous. I might be missing something.
‘I carry a separate 4000 GPH electric pump completely separate from all mechanical systems. I can also put it in the flooded compartment as needed.
Just to put this in perspective a bit. A 4000-GPH rated pump won't put out anywhere near that if if has to raise the discharge above pump level, because they are rated with no discharge hose attached. A Johnson 4000 is rated at 2600-GPH with a 3-ft lift to discharge. But for easy calculation let's be generous and your pump 3600-GPH. That's 60 gallons per minute.

Take a look at this chart (and many others if you care to search), and you will see that a little 1.5" hole two feet below the waterline will flood at a greater rate. And it will be adding 500 pounds of water per minute to your vessel.
.


I'm in no way denigrating your efforts to have extra dewatering capability onboard. Just trying to bring a bit of perspective. A glance at these numbers will help visualize the flooding rate of larger hull punctures at other depths. Heck, even easy to see why the failed hose on a frozen, "always left it open" 1.5" seacock on the hull bottom will sink almost any vessel in short order.

I could go on about wood plugs, crash mats, etc, but lots of previous posts about it.

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Old 10-11-2018, 06:31 PM
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For the money you figure a diesel trash pump with quick start would be a great solution
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Old 10-11-2018, 06:40 PM
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OCN, I completely agree with your charts. The only thing my 4K might keep up with is a damaged stuffing box leak, etc.
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Old 10-11-2018, 06:49 PM
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Originally Posted by ocnslr View Post
Just to put this in perspective a bit. A 4000-GPH rated pump won't put out anywhere near that if if has to raise the discharge above pump level, because they are rated with no discharge hose attached. A Johnson 4000 is rated at 2600-GPH with a 3-ft lift to discharge. But for easy calculation let's be generous and your pump 3600-GPH. That's 60 gallons per minute.

Take a look at this chart (and many others if you care to search), and you will see that a little 1.5" hole two feet below the waterline will flood at a greater rate. And it will be adding 500 pounds of water per minute to your vessel.
.


I'm in no way denigrating your efforts to have extra dewatering capability onboard. Just trying to bring a bit of perspective. A glance at these numbers will help visualize the flooding rate of larger hull punctures at other depths. Heck, even easy to see why the failed hose on a frozen, "always left it open" 1.5" seacock on the hull bottom will sink almost any vessel in short order.

I could go on about wood plugs, crash mats, etc, but lots of previous posts about it.

Brian
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Old 10-12-2018, 05:31 AM
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Originally Posted by BoulderGT3 View Post
My valves are right at the steps going down into the engine room. I go through the messy exercising of them 1/yr. That said, I wonder how much they really would pump out? I doubt they'd keep up with a shaft that is pulled or a rudder that's broken off.
The crash pumps would keep up with a pulled shaft. They'll suck an engine room dry a lot quicker than you'd think. Unfortunately I know. The rule on my boat is...if crap hits the fan and we need to do the crash pumps, start 1/2 way...so engines are pulling 1/2 from engine room, 1/2 from sea and watch the coolant temp. Or, if someone is able to stay in ER, go all out and just work the valve as needed.
Good idea exercising them.
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