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72’ Viking Sinks Off Port Canaveral

Old 10-08-2018, 07:20 AM
  #21  
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Yikes!
A couple of big sporties I've been have had "crash valves" installed on the engines for just such an emergency. Throw the valve and the engines suck water from the bilge instead of the through hulls, turning them into 1000 hp bilge pumps.
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Old 10-08-2018, 07:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Commocean View Post
I have to say, one of my biggest fears is tagging something like that in open water. At least with storms and lightning, you can run and duck on most cases, but the thought of running over a container or other large floating object is just freaky. With most emergencies, you can make some measured decisions and take some measured action, but something like that requires immediate and critical thinking/action.
I hate to say this but that is one of my biggest fears also that is why I hate going out before the sun breaks the horizon and stay in or around the mouth of the port getting bait fish until it starts to get light out there.People say thats why they get radar systems but they will not show what is floating.
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Old 10-08-2018, 07:28 AM
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Buddy used to mate on a Merrit I think it was. Cold molded or wood. They hIt a telephone pole at thirty knots halfway from MA to BDA. Split the telephone pole in half almost no damage whatsoever
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Old 10-08-2018, 07:42 PM
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Originally Posted by TopCat View Post
Yikes!
A couple of big sporties I've been have had "crash valves" installed on the engines for just such an emergency. Throw the valve and the engines suck water from the bilge instead of the through hulls, turning them into 1000 hp bilge pumps.
Great if you can overcome the panic, electricity (turn off generator), noise, heat (all SF’s should have ear muffs readily accessible), steam, etc. The idea of pulling a shaft scares the shit outa me.

Would like to hear more more about what happened.
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Old 10-09-2018, 06:25 AM
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Didn'r Richard Branson lose 2 boats trying to set a transAtlantic record? Seems one sank in a very short time from hitting debris.
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Old 10-09-2018, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by BOSBoatMan View Post
Buddy used to mate on a Merrit I think it was. Cold molded or wood. They hIt a telephone pole at thirty knots halfway from MA to BDA. Split the telephone pole in half almost no damage whatsoever
It doesn't matter what the boat is made out of if your running gear impacts something like that at speed your gonna snatch out shafts or punch a strut through the bottom. You better be damn quick to get to the crash valves to save a boat. Damn water logged telephone pole is like running up on the rocks.
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Old 10-09-2018, 08:18 AM
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I talked to a captain yesterday who was running a Blue hulled 72' Viking and was at Cape Marina for a bit. Hopefully it wasn't him. Super nice guy.
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Old 10-09-2018, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by slipkid View Post
Great if you can overcome the panic, electricity (turn off generator), noise, heat (all SF’s should have ear muffs readily accessible), steam, etc. The idea of pulling a shaft scares the shit outa me.

Would like to hear more more about what happened.
My valves are right at the steps going down into the engine room. I go through the messy exercising of them 1/yr. That said, I wonder how much they really would pump out? I doubt they'd keep up with a shaft that is pulled or a rudder that's broken off.
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Old 10-09-2018, 09:46 AM
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Originally Posted by BADFI$H View Post
A friend who is a technical and recovery diver told me he is working a salvage on a 72 foot Viking in about 130 ft of water off of Port Canaveral. The story is that the boat hit a telephone pole (30 footer) and ripped the prop and shaft off the bottom of the boat.

Anyone hear about this or know who it was?
I've been following this thread expecting that it described a recent event, but other than this thread, I can find nothing about it, and the comments herein don't provide anything other than speculation. As Badfish asked, does anyone have any real information?
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Old 10-09-2018, 09:51 AM
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Originally Posted by BoulderGT3 View Post
My valves are right at the steps going down into the engine room. I go through the messy exercising of them 1/yr. That said, I wonder how much they really would pump out? I doubt they'd keep up with a shaft that is pulled or a rudder that's broken off.
You would be surprised
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Old 10-09-2018, 10:53 AM
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Broke a shaft at the coupling on a 57' Carolina boat about a decade and a half ago. Shaft slid back in the strut until it hit the rudder, leaving the shaft tube wide open. Shoved a towel in the shaft tube to slow down the flow of water and the bilge pumps were able to keep up until we were able to get her on the hill - about 7 hours from 45nm offshore. Getting a strut punched through the hull would be a totally different deal but you can survive a pulled shaft or a broken rudder with a little quick thinking and action.
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Old 10-09-2018, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by MayhemFT View Post
You would be surprised
I hope you’re right and I hope I never find out. 😀
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Old 10-09-2018, 11:14 AM
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Engine cooling pumps used as crash pumps are pretty useless if a shaft pulled out. Way more water will come in than gets pumped.

Best thing to do is dive in and try to shove towels in the holes. Pretty dangerous, though. Suction can grab hold of you and then game over for you.

Even worse sometimes the impact breaks the case of the marine transmission and half the guts try to go out the hull, strut punctures upward and rudder gets ripped out. Pretty much game over then.

I've investigated several of these incidents. Ugly, all of them.
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Old 10-09-2018, 12:11 PM
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Damn.... What a horrible event.
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Old 10-09-2018, 12:17 PM
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[QUOTE=BoulderGT3;11885000]My valves are right at the steps going down into the engine room. I go through the messy exercising of them 1/yr. That said, I wonder how much they really would pump out? I doubt they'd keep up with a shaft that is pulled or a rudder that's broken off.[/QUOT

Can you explain the use of crash valve? you shut off the thru hulls and open the valves to the bilge. the engine sucks all water coming in. what happens if the water level drops and the engines suck air? you would quickly burn up the impellers I would think then trying to reprime would be impossible. I just don't understand unless it is going to sink without them anyway. but if you are still running and trying to make home port, you could lose both engines.
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Last edited by fireisland1; 10-09-2018 at 12:54 PM.
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Old 10-09-2018, 12:29 PM
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Originally Posted by BoulderGT3 View Post
....That said, I wonder how much they really would pump out? I doubt they'd keep up with a shaft that is pulled or a rudder that's broken off.
My guess would be they move a lot of water. I had a rubber wet exhaust coupler blow out on a 47' crewboat, and it filled the aft water tight compartment up 1-2 feet before I realized I was in trouble. Putting that pumping capacity to good use may not save the ship in a major flooding, but it would allow precious time to make radio calls, grab ditch bags, vests, rafts, etc
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Old 10-09-2018, 02:20 PM
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[QUOTE=fireisland1;11885789]
Originally Posted by BoulderGT3 View Post
My valves are right at the steps going down into the engine room. I go through the messy exercising of them 1/yr. That said, I wonder how much they really would pump out? I doubt they'd keep up with a shaft that is pulled or a rudder that's broken off.[/QUOT

Can you explain the use of crash valve? you shut off the thru hulls and open the valves to the bilge. the engine sucks all water coming in. what happens if the water level drops and the engines suck air? you would quickly burn up the impellers I would think then trying to reprime would be impossible. I just don't understand unless it is going to sink without them anyway. but if you are still running and trying to make home port, you could lose both engines.
You’re pretty much spot on. Close the sea cocks and open the valves. I guess you could do each partially to keep from burning up the impeller. At that point though, I think i’m Looking for the life raft. Pictures are below.


Seacock is on the right side. Strainer pick up by the red knob.

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Old 10-09-2018, 03:13 PM
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Let’s just say you are 20 miles out and you slam something. The bilge pumps can’t keep up so you open the crash pump valves. Now your engines are keeping up enough. So they start sucking air waiting for more water. Not you burnt up both pumps. Engines are now shut down. I don’t see how this set up helps. Unless someone is in the bilge actually closing valves which would be very dangerous. I might be missing something.
‘I carry a separate 4000 GPH electric pump completely separate from all mechanical systems. I can also put it in the flooded compartment as needed.
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Old 10-09-2018, 03:47 PM
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For belt and suspenders I think the crash pump valves are a great idea except a quarter turn valve would be better.
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Old 10-09-2018, 03:55 PM
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[QUOTE=BoulderGT3;11886162]
Originally Posted by fireisland1 View Post
You’re pretty much spot on. Close the sea cocks and open the valves. I guess you could do each partially to keep from burning up the impeller. At that point though, I think i’m Looking for the life raft. Pictures are below.


Seacock is on the right side. Strainer pick up by the red knob.
It's all BS.

You hole one your done with this water shut off valve above. Not even a Y valve in the photo.

Rocking boat with cooling water to the mains maybe before they run dry and cook the engines for an overheat or eat an impeller.
Try to plug the leak by any means and for sure don't f up your power plants to get you home or at least hold you to the sea state for a rescue..

Their ain't no float switch on most crash pumps. You suck the bilge dry and your main engines are toast from overheat and your ass is dead in the water.

Remember, the engine water intake varies at speed to the amount of water pumped from the mains.

Gonna take some bad ass crew to maintain water levels in a bilge by pumping out bilge water with the mains.
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