Go Back  The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum > REGIONAL BOATING & FISHING GROUPS > Florida & Georgia
Reload this Page >

Casino boat cruise out of Port Richie catches fire

Notices
Like Tree2Likes

Casino boat cruise out of Port Richie catches fire

Old 01-15-2018, 05:26 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Tampa
Posts: 2,258
Default Casino boat cruise out of Port Richie catches fire

sounds like a pretty crazy afternoon yesterday. I keep my boat nearby and we pass this shuttle all the time.

http://www.cnn.com/2018/01/15/us/florida-casino-boat-fire/index.html
787337 is offline  
Old 01-15-2018, 06:56 PM
  #2  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 5,215
Default

Originally Posted by 787337 View Post
sounds like a pretty crazy afternoon yesterday. I keep my boat nearby and we pass this shuttle all the time.

http://www.cnn.com/2018/01/15/us/flo...ire/index.html
Lot of fire real quick. A COI vessel eaten up in seconds that is supposed to have a working fire suppression system. This stinks just about as bad as that boat did.
20biminitwist is offline  
Old 01-15-2018, 08:40 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 846
Default

Happen to be in FL and watching the news reports.

TV reporter kept saying how people had to jump in the "frigid" water. I didn't know you did frigid down here. Then she said the water was 60 degrees.

Sorry for the person who lost their life of course, but frigid? Really? Lots of places that's a day at the beach in August.
ronp364 is offline  
Old 01-16-2018, 03:59 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Tampa
Posts: 2,258
Default

Originally Posted by ronp364 View Post
Happen to be in FL and watching the news reports.

TV reporter kept saying how people had to jump in the "frigid" water. I didn't know you did frigid down here. Then she said the water was 60 degrees.

Sorry for the person who lost their life of course, but frigid? Really? Lots of places that's a day at the beach in August.
Sub 60 degree water on a sunny 85 degree day feels brisk but is doable. But the same water temps on a 50 degree day with strong winds is a little different. Especially when itís a bunch of people who never intended to go in the water.

But yes, the locals donít like to get in the water until itís 80 degrees. Ha! Iíll swim 12 months a year, but I would not have chose to go swimming on Sunday.
787337 is offline  
Old 01-16-2018, 05:05 AM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Jax, FL
Posts: 1,740
Default

Originally Posted by ronp364 View Post
Happen to be in FL and watching the news reports.

TV reporter kept saying how people had to jump in the "frigid" water. I didn't know you did frigid down here. Then she said the water was 60 degrees.

Sorry for the person who lost their life of course, but frigid? Really? Lots of places that's a day at the beach in August.
Lots of places where they don't have a choice! 60 degree water is cold.
acme54321 is offline  
Old 01-16-2018, 06:20 AM
  #6  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 5,215
Default

Originally Posted by acme54321 View Post
Lots of places where they don't have a choice! 60 degree water is cold.
Loss of dexterity in 60 degree water can occur in as little as 15 minutes. They were lucky they were near the shoreline. Lots of elderly use that shuttle. Had they been in open water the outcome could have been a lot worse. That boat runs about 10 miles offshore to the casino boat.
StateRoad42 likes this.
20biminitwist is offline  
Old 01-17-2018, 05:00 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 846
Default

I get it. You pay to get on a boat, you don't expect to be jumping off, especially into less than tropical water. And it may not turn out well for some if they have to.

It's just a terminology thing.

A few years ago I was down and there was a cold snap, where it was going to be 30 degrees on a Monday morning. The TV news people were saying people should watch their kids on the morning bus stop for frostbite.

Of course southern news people have no patent on sensationalism, just ways of applying it that are amusing to northerners.
ronp364 is offline  
Old 01-17-2018, 06:45 PM
  #8  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Bradenton, FL
Posts: 234
Default

Originally Posted by ronp364 View Post
I get it. You pay to get on a boat, you don't expect to be jumping off, especially into less than tropical water. And it may not turn out well for some if they have to.

It's just a terminology thing.

A few years ago I was down and there was a cold snap, where it was going to be 30 degrees on a Monday morning. The TV news people were saying people should watch their kids on the morning bus stop for frostbite.

Of course southern news people have no patent on sensationalism, just ways of applying it that are amusing to northerners.
Kinda like how places up north warn of extremely dangerous heat when the temperature is even the slightest bit over 90.
StateRoad42 likes this.
JP11283 is offline  
Old 01-17-2018, 08:04 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 124
Default

As a coast guard inspected vessel (subchapter ĎTí or ĎKí) a fire suppression system and heat detection would be installed.
If the engine room is small enough then a pre-engineered system may be installed which is basically a fire extinguisher with a sprinkler type head that discharges a gas. Upon actuation of this system an alarm goes off at the helm and the engine shuts down. Using this type of system when the system operates the boat is dead in the water unless an override switch is used. This gas needs to be contained in the engine room (all exhaust air closed off which again includes engine/s, generators, etc) in order to be effective in suppressing a fire.

If the vessel has an engineered suppression system installed then other agents like CO2 or FM200 would be used. This system would be manually activated by the captain or instructed mate by used of a manual release pull station (or locally at the cylinder/s). In this case a separate fire alarm system would be installed to alert the helm of an overheat or fire condition. Upon receipt of an alarm the engine room would be checked to see whatís going on. If there is a fire then the captain needs to assess his options as once the system is activated the boat again will have no power hence no ability to maneuver if navigating.

I would love to know what happened here. Would not be surprised if there was a fuel leak of some sort or spray of fuel on a hot turbo. The USCG will do a VERY thorough investigation and eventually will publish the results.
Splisskin is offline  
Old 01-17-2018, 11:38 PM
  #10  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Bradenton, FL
Posts: 234
Default

Originally Posted by Splisskin View Post
As a coast guard inspected vessel (subchapter ĎTí or ĎKí) a fire suppression system and heat detection would be installed.
If the engine room is small enough then a pre-engineered system may be installed which is basically a fire extinguisher with a sprinkler type head that discharges a gas. Upon actuation of this system an alarm goes off at the helm and the engine shuts down. Using this type of system when the system operates the boat is dead in the water unless an override switch is used. This gas needs to be contained in the engine room (all exhaust air closed off which again includes engine/s, generators, etc) in order to be effective in suppressing a fire.

If the vessel has an engineered suppression system installed then other agents like CO2 or FM200 would be used. This system would be manually activated by the captain or instructed mate by used of a manual release pull station (or locally at the cylinder/s). In this case a separate fire alarm system would be installed to alert the helm of an overheat or fire condition. Upon receipt of an alarm the engine room would be checked to see whatís going on. If there is a fire then the captain needs to assess his options as once the system is activated the boat again will have no power hence no ability to maneuver if navigating.

I would love to know what happened here. Would not be surprised if there was a fuel leak of some sort or spray of fuel on a hot turbo. The USCG will do a VERY thorough investigation and eventually will publish the results.
I've read several articles that say they had another boat catch fire about a decade ago due to a fuel leak.
JP11283 is offline  
Old 01-18-2018, 05:48 AM
  #11  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 5,215
Default

They said the boat had a fairly recent USCG inspection. The way it went up it almost had to be a fuel leak of some sort. The fire suppression system would have at least slowed or contained an engine room fire. That boat was burning end to end in a matter of minutes.
20biminitwist is offline  
Old 01-18-2018, 07:59 AM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 846
Default

Originally Posted by JP11283 View Post
Kinda like how places up north warn of extremely dangerous heat when the temperature is even the slightest bit over 90.
Touche. You have better AC, we have better coats.
ronp364 is offline  
Old 01-18-2018, 08:42 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: fort lauderdale, fl
Posts: 276
Default

Originally Posted by 787337 View Post
But yes, the locals don’t like to get in the water until it’s 80 degrees. Ha! I’ll swim 12 months a year, but I would not have chose to go swimming on Sunday.
in miami even 80 is not yet warm enough
chester22 is offline  
Old 01-18-2018, 08:50 AM
  #14  
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 66
Default

crazy that this happened and sad that someone died..
chad6159 is offline  
Old 01-18-2018, 08:55 AM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: On the beach
Posts: 2,959
Default

Water was only waist deep. Passengers waded to shore. COI was 10 months old according to info. Due in March of this year. Scary how fast it was fully involved?
Still Stoked is offline  
Old 01-18-2018, 09:37 AM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 817
Default

Waiting to see how the lady died. Said she refused treatment, went home and died several hours later.
MercuryMan200 is offline  
Old 01-21-2018, 10:02 AM
  #17  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Tampa
Posts: 2,258
Default

Not much left of the boat.




787337 is offline  
Old 01-22-2018, 10:22 AM
  #18  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Clearwater Beach FL
Posts: 6,444
Default

Pretty sure fire onboard is every captains worst nightmare on the water.
It will be extremely interesting to see what went down. Captain had at minimum 1 motor as he pushed her to the shallows. You can see prop wash on the port side.
If a fire boy or other type of fire suppression system was utilized in the engine room it didn't shut down both motors. The air shut off and or fuel shut off could have failed.
I never went out on that shuttle. Interested to know where the galley was located.
I haven't seen anything from the passengers or crew that would lead me to where the fire started not that i have looked very hard.
grouperkng is offline  
Old 01-22-2018, 11:49 AM
  #19  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 124
Default

Iím not a huge fan of pre-engineered systems (firebuoy or sea fire, etc) as these actuate automatically (or manually). There is no warning when they operate and initiate engine shutdown of ALL engines/generators. If engines donít shutdown then the gas will be sucked into the motors and exhausted most likely not suppressing the fire. Openings in the hull (air intakes) are not closed in this scenario either. The extinguishing agent needs to be contained to be effective. These systems do have an over ride feature to restart engines for emergency navigation if needed. We know as stated above that at least one engine was running (maybe restarted but doubtful) in order for the captain to maneuver closer to shore.

I noticed that the yearly inspection was due in March. USCG only mandates the fire suppression/detection systems be serviced yearly. In my opinion that is not enough! Automatic suppression systems (non sprinkler) that are governed by state law always require semi-annual inspections. Marine systems should (not shall) be checked by boat owners/ operators more frequently PERIOD! On any type of commercial boat (passengers) I would make it a priority to check my fire system just like any other piece of essential equipment.

If you are a pleasure boater and not a coast guard inspected vessel and you have a pre-engineered system onboard then youíve probably not even looked at it unless your insurance company asked for it to be serviced.
If you have one then get it checked NOW. If you do get your system inspected make sure you get a report and not just a tag put on it. There are many possible issues involved with the installation of a pre-engineered system that may compromise it when itís needed most. Also, understand how your system operates and what you need to do in an emergency situation.

I could go on and on regarding this subject. Donít be the one who finds out the hard way that your system is compromised. Have it checked NOW.
Splisskin is offline  
Old 01-22-2018, 12:45 PM
  #20  
C3D
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 1,010
Default

What type of lifeboat or raft would this kind of vessel carry? I take it none were deployed due to the rapid spread of the fire?
C3D is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread