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Lift cost

Old 11-08-2019, 08:55 AM
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Default Lift cost

Just looking for a shotgun ballpark estimate on the cost of a lift, say 10-12k lbs. Miami beach. No existing pilings.
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Old 11-08-2019, 12:39 PM
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$10-$12K roughly.
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Old 11-08-2019, 12:57 PM
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Don't forget to add cost of electric. That can add a few grand depending on the run length.
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Old 11-09-2019, 08:18 AM
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Permitting, access, depth of water, type of hoist, with or without a deck, hydraulic or cable, etc. are all factors. the $1/lb rule of thumb is entry level with no frills. You could spend 3-4X that easy depending on your decisions. If youd like to PM me, feel free. I own two marine construction companies, one in coastal Georgia and one in South Florida, so I kinda know what Im talking about. I have no problem giving you a little consult free of charge with no strings attached. I appreciate more business but certainly dont need it. Rising tides and expiring concrete keep me pretty damn busy as it is
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Old 11-10-2019, 06:58 AM
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Around here $1.50/lb is a typical rate when you include docks, power, water, etc. Don’t forget about permitting. It can delay the process for months. I’m having a new lift and docks built currently and permitting took roughly 7 months.
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Old 11-10-2019, 07:04 AM
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Originally Posted by CaptainRobin View Post
Permitting, access, depth of water, type of hoist, with or without a deck, hydraulic or cable, etc. are all factors. the $1/lb rule of thumb is entry level with no frills. You could spend 3-4X that easy depending on your decisions. If youd like to PM me, feel free. I own two marine construction companies, one in coastal Georgia and one in South Florida, so I kinda know what Im talking about. I have no problem giving you a little consult free of charge with no strings attached. I appreciate more business but certainly dont need it. Rising tides and expiring concrete keep me pretty damn busy as it is
LOL. I mentioned to somebody that it seemed the water levels at my docks are higher than they used to be and they went off the deep end with me and hit every button including politics, jesus, Al Gore, etc. Regardless, the water levels are higher than they used to be and Im in the process of re-building our docks higher than before.
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Old 11-10-2019, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by haneyrm View Post
LOL. I mentioned to somebody that it seemed the water levels at my docks are higher than they used to be and they went off the deep end with me and hit every button including politics, jesus, Al Gore, etc. Regardless, the water levels are higher than they used to be and Im in the process of re-building our docks higher than before.
Raised mine 12 inches. City won't issue building permit for new construction until sea wall raised to new code height. To the OP. Until you get quotes from contractors on your specific lot you're wasting your time.
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Old 11-10-2019, 07:49 AM
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We paid roughly $1,000 for every 1k of capacity. So I’d say about 10-12k.
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Old 11-10-2019, 07:55 AM
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All in after all the permit fees and taxes and electrical my brand new 12,000# cradle lift in the Lower Keys from Lifetime Dock and Lumber was just over $16K. It's pretty much top of the line, and that included a boarding dock with composite lumber. Also, everything is either aluminum, stainless or composite (no pressure treated lumber anywhere).
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Old 11-10-2019, 08:05 AM
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Originally Posted by haneyrm View Post
LOL. I mentioned to somebody that it seemed the water levels at my docks are higher than they used to be and they went off the deep end with me and hit every button including politics, jesus, Al Gore, etc. Regardless, the water levels are higher than they used to be and Im in the process of re-building our docks higher than before.
Can you send that water here, mine haven't changed in a decade. Did someone redistribute my water?
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Old 11-12-2019, 08:54 AM
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Same here,I need some more water,same water for the last sixty five years.My father marked a high water line in a rock back in june of nineteen hundred and fifty five,here in Jupiter ,looked at it yesterday at high tide,tide came to same mark.My father showed me water in first street in Miami nineteen forty six and said ,son they built Miami too low.Now if the moon would only stand still I would be able to keep that nice high tide.Unfortunately next spring the tide will be so low that I will not be able to get off my lift.
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Old 11-12-2019, 12:30 PM
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Suggestion from my old neighbor who bought two lifts, the 2nd when he got a bigger boat. Much of the cost of a lift is in the labor, poles, etc. Consider getting a heavier lift because if you get a heavier boat later, you will regret not buying a bigger lift. I got a 20,000 lb lift, but have never owned a boat over 7,500lb. I can if I want and it helps with home marketing if I go to sell...
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Old 11-12-2019, 12:59 PM
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Originally Posted by AutomaticEye View Post
Suggestion from my old neighbor who bought two lifts, the 2nd when he got a bigger boat. Much of the cost of a lift is in the labor, poles, etc. Consider getting a heavier lift because if you get a heavier boat later, you will regret not buying a bigger lift. I got a 20,000 lb lift, but have never owned a boat over 7,500lb. I can if I want and it helps with home marketing if I go to sell...
Good advice on exceeding the required lift capacity when you initially install but I want to add that if you double the lift capacity by double cabling you also double the time to lift.

I had a 6500# lift installed and was going to have my builder use double cabling to get the capacity close to 13k#s until I actually saw a double cable lift in action. Gracias pero no gracias.

As to cost to build, I had a 26 x 14 covered (metal roof) lift with a 4' walkway added on 2 sides and a 6500# lift built for $23k. They also cut up part of an existing walkway and repiled under it. For that coin the builder did an absolutely first rate job imo.

I also paid $750 for help from a retired CoE employee with Corp of Engineers permitting which was required where I built. This expense was optional as a lot of people do this themselves but there are also 'horror' stories of people waiting up to a year and a half to get through the CoE review process whereas my permits were issued maybe 6 weeks after we applied.
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Old 11-12-2019, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by AutomaticEye View Post
Suggestion from my old neighbor who bought two lifts, the 2nd when he got a bigger boat. Much of the cost of a lift is in the labor, poles, etc. Consider getting a heavier lift because if you get a heavier boat later, you will regret not buying a bigger lift. I got a 20,000 lb lift, but have never owned a boat over 7,500lb. I can if I want and it helps with home marketing if I go to sell...
Absolutely. Along with new sea wall & dock; replaced a pair of davits with a 16,000 lb. elevator lift. Boat is 6,000. lbs.
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Old 11-12-2019, 07:49 PM
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13,000lb Boatlift: Provide labor and material to install a DECO #13,000 lift including the pilings and all associated material including the Auto Stop & Remote

Does not include permitting.

(I am in the process of getting quotes in the Venice area.)
Here is the first quote . . . . $11,900
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Old 11-12-2019, 08:07 PM
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Originally Posted by mikefloyd View Post
Can you send that water here, mine haven't changed in a decade. Did someone redistribute my water?
Mike, I am right across the river from you and have seen the water level rise over the decades. I have lived here continuously since 74. In that year, we build the "mother of all seawalls" (for us) with solid concrete 6 feet high and at least 5 feet thick. It has gone nowhere since no matter the weather. But the water level has risen steadily since then. Originally it never got more than 3 inches below the top with normal high tides. Now it regularly gets about 2 inches over the top. That aligns with the estimates we have all seen. The generally accepted rate is 0.12 inches (3mm) per year which makes it about 5 inches since 1974. That matches our experience. It is just more obvious to us now because it is over the top. The seawall height has been confirmed steady by using nearby landmarks and pilings. In a decade, the rise would only be about 1.2 inches, maybe not enough to notice.

People who claim to have monitored one mark using just two high water height samples are not realistic, since the tides vary every day.
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Old 11-14-2019, 05:37 AM
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Originally Posted by mikefloyd View Post
Can you send that water here, mine haven't changed in a decade. Did someone redistribute my water?
My original dock was built low and was under water frequently. About 25 years ago, it was torn down and rebuilt at a higher elevation. Today, the water level is at the top of the docks about once per month. Time to rebuild anyways so I’m raising them 12”. Should be good for my lifetime.

Maybe jesus is protecting your dock from rising tides since you’re special.
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Old 11-17-2019, 08:53 AM
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I am no engineer but could it have something to do with silt levels in certain areas? I know they are in the process of dredging millions of yards of silt out of the Indian river and canals, back down to constructed depth. If you have a couple foot of silt built up over the past 40-50 yrs and the moon tries to pull in the same amount of water, it seems it would naturally be a little higher from all the silt that has washed in and removed capacity from rivers and canals?
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Old 11-17-2019, 02:34 PM
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If I had to do it all over again?

The biggest friggin' lift I could have put there is what I would have done. I now have a 20k lift with piles 14' O.C. And it limits what I can do. An elevator lift that could accommodate the biggest possible beam boat would be my choice.

Don't get me wrong, I like my lift... but the boats that my wife and I are looking at will never work with the lift I have.
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Old 11-17-2019, 03:43 PM
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Originally Posted by tcrane3184@aol.com View Post
Same here,I need some more water,same water for the last sixty five years.My father marked a high water line in a rock back in june of nineteen hundred and fifty five,here in Jupiter ,looked at it yesterday at high tide,tide came to same mark.
I'm happy to send you some of the water from my neighborhood - I raised my dock about a foot compared to original, but cruising through the canals yesterday I saw a number of 1960s wood docks that were squarely underwater. Call me naive, but I'm hard pressed to imagine that when the built those docks originally that they were being submerged twice a day for 3 months every fall/winter. I'll admit, of course, that I can't promise it isn't the seawalls sinking but looks suspicious to me.
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