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Is Fort Lauderdale officially becoming New Jersey??

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Is Fort Lauderdale officially becoming New Jersey??

Old 05-17-2019, 04:50 PM
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
Yea, that's it. Was she the one who could shine a flashlight on her feet without using her hands??

First time I was in Lauderdale, the Mai-Kai was on the edge of town. I may rag on Lauderdale, but it was fantastic in the 1960-s. Just too much change.
It can be a colorful place. Always plays second fiddle to Mijami, but we can hold our own as to whom is doing who.
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Old 06-19-2019, 05:41 AM
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You guys won! NJ is coming to you, Fort Lauderdale!! Congrats!! You should be proud!! Enjoy it!
--
The pay for Fort Lauderdale’s political leaders will more than double after the next election, and future politicians could receive a city pension during retirement, after the City Commission unanimously approved the enhancements Tuesday night.

The current salary for the mayor is $35,000. Commissioners make $30,000. The new salaries start at $78,840 for the mayor, a 125% increase, and $65,700 for commissioners, a 119% increase. Raises will be given each year, automatically.

Commissioners previously agreed they wanted annual raises to be automatic, so they wouldn’t have to publicly revisit the issue each year.

Commissioners did not discuss the increase before voting Tuesday. It was placed on the “consent” agenda, approved with a long list of other items after no one on the City Commission pulled it for individual attention.

The actual salaries weren’t revealed in the public documents for Tuesday’s meeting.

While some mayors in South Florida make more, city commissioner pay in other South Florida cities is lower. Miami commissioners make $58,200. Hollywood commissioners make $29,561. Pembroke Pines commissioners make $24,360. Coral Springs commissioners make $18,800.


Raises for Fort Lauderdale politicians coming »Oakland Park commissioners are set to vote on raises this week, also. Commissioners’ pay would increase 30 percent from $12,718 to $16,535 and the mayor’s pay from $14,413 to $18,740.

The job carries no required number of work hours, so it’s up to each elected official whether the job is part-time, or full-time. Fort Lauderdale’s City Commission meets twice monthly.

The April calendars for Fort Lauderdale commissioners and the mayor, released to the South Florida Sun Sentinel in response to a records request, showed large blocks of free time, occasional weekdays with no work scheduled, and a range of total work hours, from very few, to a typical 40-hour work week.

Commissioner Heather Moraitis showed weekends mostly free, and weekdays with lots of unscheduled time. The week of April 15, a busy week with a City Commission meeting, for example, her schedule showed 9.5 hours blocked off for city business for the week, plus a Tuesday City Commission meeting that spanned from noon until about 9 p.m. The following week, her schedule showed 10 hours in the office or attending events.

But she said she checks emails all day long, and her time emailing and on the phone isn’t shown.

“If we want to attract educated and committed candidates to run for office, we should offer a salary that allows someone to do this full-time,” she said in an email.

Commissioner Robert McKinzie’s schedule the week of April 15 showed 20.5 hours of celebrations, meetings and events, plus the nine-hour city meeting.

Commissioner Ben Sorensen had 32.5 hours scheduled for the week, including a church service and an eight-hour block of “email and phone calls,” plus the Tuesday nine-hour city meeting.

Commissioner Steve Glassman scheduled an hour and a half for emails each day. The week of April 15 he had 32.5 hours of scheduled meetings or festivities, plus the official meeting. For the month, he said there were 526 phone calls in and out of his office, and 1,760 emails.

Trantalis’s schedule that week showed 11.5 hours of meetings and events, plus the city meeting. He had Friday, Saturday and Sunday (Easter weekend) free.

Trantalis said he spends three and a half hours reviewing materials the weekend before City Commission meetings. He estimated he spends two to three hours each day dealing with emails and phone calls. And there are unscheduled encounters as he goes about his daily routine.

Several on the commission work outside jobs. The mayor is an attorney, Sorensen is a leadership coach, McKinzie is a general contractor. Glassman is retired. Moraitis is a former private school teacher and administrator who said she can’t make a part-time job work because of the demands of her commission job.

The vote Tuesday also increased commissioners’ monthly expense accounts to $750, or $9,000 a year, for cellphone, car and office purchases. Currently, commissioners get $300 a month and the mayor gets $500.

Commissioners also will get a retirement plan, if the city moves to the state’s retirement system for all city employees.

Lastly, the vote allowed the city elected officials to receive free health insurance for themselves, and subsidized health insurance for dependents, under the same terms at the top-tier management employees. Fort Lauderdale City Manager Chris Lagerbloom’s memo did not detail the terms.

The salary for Fort Lauderdale’s commissioners will be higher than that of an experienced secondary schoolteacher in Broward ($62,081), higher than the median-earning hotel manager ($58,400), but less than the typical first-line supervisor in Broward ($75,928), according to figures from the Greater Fort Lauderdale Alliance.

Lagerbloom wrote in a memo for Tuesday’s vote that he recommends the salaries be based on the annual Area Median Income for a household, as set by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. His memo doesn’t say what this year’s figure is. But in a previous memo, he pinpointed the amount currently at $65,700. He recommended the mayor make 20% more. The figure typically goes up each year, although in a recession, it could drop.

Tuesday’s vote is based on income of a household, which can include two income-earners.

The median is the midpoint income; half the households bring in less, half bring in more.

Public opinion on the proposal is mixed.

One resident pointed out that Trantalis voted against police and fire raises in fall 2017, during his last term as a city commissioner. He objected to their pay being tied to the pay of other emergency responders in the region, because of implications for the city’s future budgets. He also complained he didn’t have enough time to evaluate those raises.

Andrew Heller, a city resident, wrote to City Hall to express support.

“I actually think the proposed raises are still far too low to actually attract and retain the talent we need and to compensate you in a way even close to what you deserve,” he wrote. “But I guess one step at a time.”

In other action, Fort Lauderdale commissioners:

* RISING FEES: Held a budget workshop and discussed raising the fire fee, trash collection charges, water and sewer rates (starting October 2020), and stormwater fees. The property tax rate is proposed to remain the same, at about $412 for every $1,000 of taxable property value. But tax collections — and individual tax bills — still would rise, on the whole, because property values went up 8.2% on average. The city would glean an additional $10.3 million by keeping the tax rate the same as last year. The fire fee is expected to be increased $55 to $311. Commissioners are continuing to make good on a promise to stop raiding the water-sewer fund for unrelated expenses. The practice is being phased out over several years.

* TRASH BILLS: Gave the first of two votes needed to raise trash bills $8.14 per month, a 25 percent, to $40.70.

Brittany Wallman can be reached at bwallman@sunsentinel.com or 954-356-4541. Follow her coverage on Twitter @BrittanyWallman.
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Old 06-19-2019, 06:44 AM
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Originally Posted by OldPete View Post
You guys won! NJ is coming to you, Fort Lauderdale!! Congrats!! You should be proud!! Enjoy it!
--
The pay for Fort Lauderdale’s political leaders will more than double after the next election, and future politicians could receive a city pension during retirement, after the City Commission unanimously approved the enhancements Tuesday night.

The current salary for the mayor is $35,000. Commissioners make $30,000. The new salaries start at $78,840 for the mayor, a 125% increase, and $65,700 for commissioners, a 119% increase. Raises will be given each year, automatically.

Commissioners previously agreed they wanted annual raises to be automatic, so they wouldn’t have to publicly revisit the issue each year.

Commissioners did not discuss the increase before voting Tuesday. It was placed on the “consent” agenda, approved with a long list of other items after no one on the City Commission pulled it for individual attention.

The actual salaries weren’t revealed in the public documents for Tuesday’s meeting.

While some mayors in South Florida make more, city commissioner pay in other South Florida cities is lower. Miami commissioners make $58,200. Hollywood commissioners make $29,561. Pembroke Pines commissioners make $24,360. Coral Springs commissioners make $18,800.


Raises for Fort Lauderdale politicians coming »Oakland Park commissioners are set to vote on raises this week, also. Commissioners’ pay would increase 30 percent from $12,718 to $16,535 and the mayor’s pay from $14,413 to $18,740.

The job carries no required number of work hours, so it’s up to each elected official whether the job is part-time, or full-time. Fort Lauderdale’s City Commission meets twice monthly.

The April calendars for Fort Lauderdale commissioners and the mayor, released to the South Florida Sun Sentinel in response to a records request, showed large blocks of free time, occasional weekdays with no work scheduled, and a range of total work hours, from very few, to a typical 40-hour work week.

Commissioner Heather Moraitis showed weekends mostly free, and weekdays with lots of unscheduled time. The week of April 15, a busy week with a City Commission meeting, for example, her schedule showed 9.5 hours blocked off for city business for the week, plus a Tuesday City Commission meeting that spanned from noon until about 9 p.m. The following week, her schedule showed 10 hours in the office or attending events.

But she said she checks emails all day long, and her time emailing and on the phone isn’t shown.

“If we want to attract educated and committed candidates to run for office, we should offer a salary that allows someone to do this full-time,” she said in an email.

Commissioner Robert McKinzie’s schedule the week of April 15 showed 20.5 hours of celebrations, meetings and events, plus the nine-hour city meeting.

Commissioner Ben Sorensen had 32.5 hours scheduled for the week, including a church service and an eight-hour block of “email and phone calls,” plus the Tuesday nine-hour city meeting.

Commissioner Steve Glassman scheduled an hour and a half for emails each day. The week of April 15 he had 32.5 hours of scheduled meetings or festivities, plus the official meeting. For the month, he said there were 526 phone calls in and out of his office, and 1,760 emails.

Trantalis’s schedule that week showed 11.5 hours of meetings and events, plus the city meeting. He had Friday, Saturday and Sunday (Easter weekend) free.

Trantalis said he spends three and a half hours reviewing materials the weekend before City Commission meetings. He estimated he spends two to three hours each day dealing with emails and phone calls. And there are unscheduled encounters as he goes about his daily routine.

Several on the commission work outside jobs. The mayor is an attorney, Sorensen is a leadership coach, McKinzie is a general contractor. Glassman is retired. Moraitis is a former private school teacher and administrator who said she can’t make a part-time job work because of the demands of her commission job.

The vote Tuesday also increased commissioners’ monthly expense accounts to $750, or $9,000 a year, for cellphone, car and office purchases. Currently, commissioners get $300 a month and the mayor gets $500.

Commissioners also will get a retirement plan, if the city moves to the state’s retirement system for all city employees.

Lastly, the vote allowed the city elected officials to receive free health insurance for themselves, and subsidized health insurance for dependents, under the same terms at the top-tier management employees. Fort Lauderdale City Manager Chris Lagerbloom’s memo did not detail the terms.

The salary for Fort Lauderdale’s commissioners will be higher than that of an experienced secondary schoolteacher in Broward ($62,081), higher than the median-earning hotel manager ($58,400), but less than the typical first-line supervisor in Broward ($75,928), according to figures from the Greater Fort Lauderdale Alliance.

Lagerbloom wrote in a memo for Tuesday’s vote that he recommends the salaries be based on the annual Area Median Income for a household, as set by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. His memo doesn’t say what this year’s figure is. But in a previous memo, he pinpointed the amount currently at $65,700. He recommended the mayor make 20% more. The figure typically goes up each year, although in a recession, it could drop.

Tuesday’s vote is based on income of a household, which can include two income-earners.

The median is the midpoint income; half the households bring in less, half bring in more.

Public opinion on the proposal is mixed.

One resident pointed out that Trantalis voted against police and fire raises in fall 2017, during his last term as a city commissioner. He objected to their pay being tied to the pay of other emergency responders in the region, because of implications for the city’s future budgets. He also complained he didn’t have enough time to evaluate those raises.

Andrew Heller, a city resident, wrote to City Hall to express support.

“I actually think the proposed raises are still far too low to actually attract and retain the talent we need and to compensate you in a way even close to what you deserve,” he wrote. “But I guess one step at a time.”

In other action, Fort Lauderdale commissioners:

* RISING FEES: Held a budget workshop and discussed raising the fire fee, trash collection charges, water and sewer rates (starting October 2020), and stormwater fees. The property tax rate is proposed to remain the same, at about $412 for every $1,000 of taxable property value. But tax collections — and individual tax bills — still would rise, on the whole, because property values went up 8.2% on average. The city would glean an additional $10.3 million by keeping the tax rate the same as last year. The fire fee is expected to be increased $55 to $311. Commissioners are continuing to make good on a promise to stop raiding the water-sewer fund for unrelated expenses. The practice is being phased out over several years.

* TRASH BILLS: Gave the first of two votes needed to raise trash bills $8.14 per month, a 25 percent, to $40.70.

Brittany Wallman can be reached at bwallman@sunsentinel.com or 954-356-4541. Follow her coverage on Twitter @BrittanyWallman.
No shame. The pension is worse than the raise. Sucks on workers for life. No government job should pay pensions.
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Old 06-19-2019, 06:51 AM
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Brittany Wallman, enough said.

Guys, you know the way to change this, right?
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Old 06-19-2019, 07:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Parker Yacht View Post
Brittany Wallman, enough said.

Guys, you know the way to change this, right?
Hard to change. Decades of questionable activities. A general apathetic attitude towards local government. Lots of condo dwellers/seasonal residents who simply don't know or care what happens locally.
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Old 06-19-2019, 08:05 AM
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Originally Posted by joe.giuliano View Post
No shame. The pension is worse than the raise. Sucks on workers for life. No government job should pay pensions.
100% correct! I wish more people would see it!

Originally Posted by Parker Yacht View Post
Brittany Wallman, enough said.

Guys, you know the way to change this, right?
Not really! You can't stop the creep! Once FTL does it, the other towns will follow and the transformation of South Florida into New Jersey will get worse. I know you think you can vote to prevent it. But... you can't. It is a waste of time to try. I tried for a long time in NJ. In the end, I moved. The people who support this sort of thing will never unlock their jaws from the tit.

Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
Hard to change. Decades of questionable activities. A general apathetic attitude towards local government. Lots of condo dwellers/seasonal residents who simply don't know or care what happens locally.
It is the local voters. Seasonal people don't vote. The local voters believe the liberal mindset. Big government is good -- because they want to get in on it.

--

You can't stop it. You can try to slow it down.
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Old 06-19-2019, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
Hard to change. Decades of questionable activities. A general apathetic attitude towards local government. Lots of condo dwellers/seasonal residents who simply don't know or care what happens locally.
Originally Posted by OldPete View Post
100% correct! I wish more people would see it!



Not really! You can't stop the creep! Once FTL does it, the other towns will follow and the transformation of South Florida into New Jersey will get worse. I know you think you can vote to prevent it. But... you can't. It is a waste of time to try. I tried for a long time in NJ. In the end, I moved. The people who support this sort of thing will never unlock their jaws from the tit.



It is the local voters. Seasonal people don't vote. The local voters believe the liberal mindset. Big government is good -- because they want to get in on it.

--

You can't stop it. You can try to slow it down.
But, you can.
For years politics in Ft Laud has been the good Ol' boy network, people that "cared" for the community. I use the term "cared" losely.
Now, they have tired of it, it's new people from out of town, whom, A) Don't have the money to do it for nothing, B) "Care" in a different direction.
You want to change it, get you , and two of your best friends, get voted in, take a pay cut, and listen to some guys on a boating board bitch.
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Old 06-19-2019, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Parker Yacht View Post
But, you can.
For years politics in Ft Laud has been the good Ol' boy network, people that "cared" for the community. I use the term "cared" losely.
Now, they have tired of it, it's new people from out of town, whom, A) Don't have the money to do it for nothing, B) "Care" in a different direction.
You want to change it, get you , and two of your best friends, get voted in, take a pay cut, and listen to some guys on a boating board bitch.

http://www.bcpa.net Look up the mayor... what's he up to 4 or 5 properties now? And that's just under his name. LOL. Poor soul. Really needs that extra coin. LOL.

I agree... however, you could try to eat your way out from the inside. But wouldn't it be nice if people wanted that?
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Old 06-19-2019, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by OldPete View Post
http://www.bcpa.net Look up the mayor... what's he up to 4 or 5 properties now? And that's just under his name. LOL. Poor soul. Really needs that extra coin. LOL.

I agree... however, you could try to eat your way out from the inside. But wouldn't it be nice if people wanted that?
Pete,
Seriously, you care enough, go change it.
Sitting on the outside, complaining about it, doesn't get it changed.
Ft Lauderdale isn't what it was, accept it, try to change it or move.
I'm heading for the latter.
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Old 06-19-2019, 10:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Lorne Greene View Post
Here is my $.02 on why I am not against this.

First doubling the salary from 35K to 65K is not unreasonable. With such a low salary it makes it so only people who have money can afford to hold these positions. The other thing is why would someone work for 35K when they can make $65K on the open market? What tallent are you going to attract by paying less then the market pays?

OMG, I cannot believe the naivete of so many of you! "...only people who have money can afford to hold these positions" are you guys smoking something? Do you mean to tell me that it is difficult to find people in any community who would not take a job for $35K plus expenses, plus retirement plus medical? I can name a number of very smart, hard-working, HONEST people in my community who make less than that or about the same with no benefits who would make outstanding commissioners. The problem is and has always been every one of these 'politicians' is connected in some way to people who want something from the county/city and have the power and/or money to ensure they stay in office. You don't get elected in any community today without either being wealthy or connected. So you say, "well why not increase the pay then so the school teacher can run?" The answer is it will not make a bit of difference. The people behind the scenes, developers, lawyers, and anyone else who has money will still control the election by virtue of their money and influence. NO ONE makes anyone run for office and if these creeps [and few are not], don't like the measly pay, then get the hell out of office and go work as a lobbyist.

Here's an interesting proposal that would never see the light of day. A limit on what any candidate can spend and what any candidate can collect from donors. Level the playing field and that amount must be reasonable so that the mother who now works at Walgreens or the small business guy can afford to run and add term limits. It will never happen! In Stuart, we have a scumbag, Doug Smith; an arrogant, condescending failed businessman who has been on the commission for 19 years! He is so entrenched with the people behind the scenes including out of state and out of county developers they have done everything to keep this punk in office including running a third candidate, to split the vote. This is what you get when these guys get elected, you can't get them out of office....give them more money, and it will never end. For crying out loud, how many stories do you need to read concerning public workers collecting massive pensions?

"In Los Angeles, retirement payments for some top politicians, police and fire officials don't really count as pensions anymore. The city is essentially handing over wads of taxpayer cash directly to retired leaders.
The Los Angeles Times reports that retirement pay for dozens of retired public officials has grown so large that they're slamming into the ceiling of what the IRS allows to fall under the tax breaks of a pension fund. So as public employee pension funds skyrocket on the top end, the city had to make a special "Excess Benefit Plan" fund that has paid off $14.6 million to 110 employees over the past eight years."

"California's entire public-sector compensation system is absurdly generous. For instance, the median pension for a recent state Highway Patrol retiree is $98,000 a year—available at age 50 and paid for the life of the retiree and that retiree's spouse. The median pay and benefits package for a California firefighter is more than $175,000 a year.


As the Orange County Register reported, the city of Newport Beach had fourteen full-time lifeguards, with thirteen of them earning more than $120,000 a year in total compensation. "More than half the lifeguards collected more than $150,000 for 2010 with the two highest-paid collecting $211,451 and $203,481 in total compensation respectively," according to the report. These are not aberrations."

These generous packages are approved by the politicians to buy the support of the various public sector unions. Do you think some newbie is going to win an election if the incumbent was responsible for a generous pay hike or pension plan for the firefighters? This is exactly what happened in Stuart with Doug Smith early in his career and why we cannot get him out of office.

This is Florida's future because people keep buying the BS that these politicians feed you.

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Old 06-19-2019, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by oceanluvr30 View Post
OMG, I cannot believe the naivete of so many of you! "...only people who have money can afford to hold these positions" are you guys smoking something? Do you mean to tell me that it is difficult to find people in any community who would not take a job for $35K plus expenses, plus retirement plus medical? I can name a number of very smart, hard-working, HONEST people in my community who make less than that or about the same with no benefits who would make outstanding commissioners. The problem is and has always been every one of these 'politicians' is connected in some way to people who want something from the county/city and have the power and/or money to ensure they stay in office. You don't get elected in any community today without either being wealthy or connected. So you say, "well why not increase the pay then so the school teacher can run?" The answer is it will not make a bit of difference. The people behind the scenes, developers, lawyers, and anyone else who has money will still control the election by virtue of their money and influence. NO ONE makes anyone run for office and if these creeps [and few are not], don't like the measly pay, then get the hell out of office and go work as a lobbyist.

Here's an interesting proposal that would never see the light of day. A limit on what any candidate can spend and what any candidate can collect from donors. Level the playing field and that amount must be reasonable so that the mother who now works at Walgreens or the small business guy can afford to run and add term limits. It will never happen! In Stuart, we have a scumbag, Doug Smith; an arrogant, condescending failed businessman who has been on the commission for 19 years! He is so entrenched with the people behind the scenes including out of state and out of county developers they have done everything to keep this punk in office including running a third candidate, to split the vote. This is what you get when these guys get elected, you can't get them out of office....give them more money, and it will never end. For crying out loud, how many stories do you need to read concerning public workers collecting massive pensions?

"In Los Angeles, retirement payments for some top politicians, police and fire officials don't really count as pensions anymore. The city is essentially handing over wads of taxpayer cash directly to retired leaders.
The Los Angeles Times reports that retirement pay for dozens of retired public officials has grown so large that they're slamming into the ceiling of what the IRS allows to fall under the tax breaks of a pension fund. So as public employee pension funds skyrocket on the top end, the city had to make a special "Excess Benefit Plan" fund that has paid off $14.6 million to 110 employees over the past eight years."

"California's entire public-sector compensation system is absurdly generous. For instance, the median pension for a recent state Highway Patrol retiree is $98,000 a year—available at age 50 and paid for the life of the retiree and that retiree's spouse. The median pay and benefits package for a California firefighter is more than $175,000 a year.


As the Orange County Register reported, the city of Newport Beach had fourteen full-time lifeguards, with thirteen of them earning more than $120,000 a year in total compensation. "More than half the lifeguards collected more than $150,000 for 2010 with the two highest-paid collecting $211,451 and $203,481 in total compensation respectively," according to the report. These are not aberrations."

These generous packages are approved by the politicians to buy the support of the various public sector unions. Do you think some newbie is going to win an election if the incumbent was responsible for a generous pay hike or pension plan for the firefighters? This is exactly what happened in Stuart with Doug Smith early in his career and why we cannot get him out of office.

This is Florida's future because people keep buying the BS that these politicians feed you.
Well said!

I wonder if people out there WANT to see things get bad so that they can capitalize on it! No other logical explanation. Why would you destroy such a wonderful place to live and raise your kids? Makes no sense.
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Old 06-20-2019, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by joe.giuliano View Post
No shame. The pension is worse than the raise. Sucks on workers for life. No government job should pay pensions.
Was astonished to read that 'the Coward of Broward' (he retired shortly after the Parkland MSD Massacre) was receiving a $100K Annual Pension.

This generous program isn't just Broward, it's statewide and don't know which other employees (besides Deputies) get it, but in private employment today, you're increasingly required to save to provide your own retirement funds.
Art
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Old 06-21-2019, 07:54 AM
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GET USED TO IT GUYS it is only going to go downhill from here on out in the next couple of years we will have a state tax and a bloated government work force.
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Old 06-21-2019, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Eaglemsi1 View Post
GET USED TO IT GUYS it is only going to go downhill from here on out in the next couple of years we will have a state tax and a bloated government work force.

If DeSantis wins another 4, then we're in amazing shape. My fear is that with the prisoner voting thing we're going to get Gilum for the next 4 and that'll be a huge problem. However, if Gilum tries for State Income Tax, he'll do the creep where he'll do 1% on over $100k or something like that... and then it creeps from there - at that point, we will be in huge trouble.

A LOT hinges on how well DeSantis continues to do. So far he has made a lot of great moves... but we need to see what grows from the seeds he has planted. The education grants still aren't funded... Healthcare still hasn't opened up... And we still don't know if we're going to get another run of crap green/red water.

If those things start to pan out like we hope... then I can't imagine that anyone will be able to beat him. It's going to be a very pivotal election next time around.

As far as local government crazy crap like Fort Lauderdale... I think that Oly is about right. You have to fight that at the local level. Either get involved or stand up and motivate people to see it. The problem is that when a huge population of the people are on the other side, it is very hard to make a difference. Local government is where it all starts. Once government sees that people are willing to pay $12k a year in property taxes for a dump on 50x100 the rest falls apart. They just milk the stupids.
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Old 06-21-2019, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by OldPete View Post
If DeSantis wins another 4, then we're in amazing shape. My fear is that with the prisoner voting thing we're going to get Gilum for the next 4 and that'll be a huge problem. However, if Gilum tries for State Income Tax, he'll do the creep where he'll do 1% on over $100k or something like that... and then it creeps from there - at that point, we will be in huge trouble.

A LOT hinges on how well DeSantis continues to do. So far he has made a lot of great moves... but we need to see what grows from the seeds he has planted. The education grants still aren't funded... Healthcare still hasn't opened up... And we still don't know if we're going to get another run of crap green/red water.

If those things start to pan out like we hope... then I can't imagine that anyone will be able to beat him. It's going to be a very pivotal election next time around.

As far as local government crazy crap like Fort Lauderdale... I think that Oly is about right. You have to fight that at the local level. Either get involved or stand up and motivate people to see it. The problem is that when a huge population of the people are on the other side, it is very hard to make a difference. Local government is where it all starts. Once government sees that people are willing to pay $12k a year in property taxes for a dump on 50x100 the rest falls apart. They just milk the stupids.
Pete,
I liken local gobment similar to HOA, Clubs, etc.
I've seen it, got involved, my friends where involved, we made a difference, we made changes.
Then, we just flat out got tired and lazy, the "other" side came in, with their friends, and Poof, we were on the outside, just like that.
Mostly because we just didn't care to carry the fight any longer. Eff em.
I just want fresh conch salad and smoke a ceegar.
Get off my ocean/tuna bed/conch patch/weedline.
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Old 06-21-2019, 11:53 AM
  #76  
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Originally Posted by Parker Yacht View Post
Pete,
I liken local gobment similar to HOA, Clubs, etc.
I've seen it, got involved, my friends where involved, we made a difference, we made changes.
Then, we just flat out got tired and lazy, the "other" side came in, with their friends, and Poof, we were on the outside, just like that.
Mostly because we just didn't care to carry the fight any longer. Eff em.
I just want fresh conch salad and smoke a ceegar.
Get off my ocean/tuna bed/conch patch/weedline.
You heading east or south? I think it will be worse than what I have now... but the trade-off is excellent. Our next stop is between Key West and Marathon. I don't want to be in Marathon, and I don't want to be in KW -- but I want to be able to be at either one with reasonable ease. Of course, that's exactly where Irma hammered and it still looks like war zone. I know it's from the pan to the fire, but it's a really nice fire. LOL.
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Old 06-21-2019, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by OldPete View Post
You heading east or south? I think it will be worse than what I have now... but the trade-off is excellent. Our next stop is between Key West and Marathon. I don't want to be in Marathon, and I don't want to be in KW -- but I want to be able to be at either one with reasonable ease. Of course, that's exactly where Irma hammered and it still looks like war zone. I know it's from the pan to the fire, but it's a really nice fire. LOL.
East.
Then I can sit back, watch it all go backwards, sideways at a MUCH slower pace, costing 10 times the money.
As long as I can grab my 6 conch, I will be happy.
You guys can have this place.
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Old 06-21-2019, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by OldPete View Post
If

As far as local government crazy crap like Fort Lauderdale... I think that Oly is about right. You have to fight that at the local level. Either get involved or stand up and motivate people to see it. The problem is that when a huge population of the people are on the other side, it is very hard to make a difference. Local government is where it all starts. Once government sees that people are willing to pay $12k a year in property taxes for a dump on 50x100 the rest falls apart. They just milk the stupids.
I agree with you on DeSantis, but boy did we dodge a bullet last time, a little close for comfort. But let's be realistic, the other side has all the time and money in the world so this BS notion that if you don't like it get involved is nothing but a fairytale. Occasionally someone comes along and hits the lottery, so to speak and makes a difference but by and large the history of the world can be summed up in four words - greed, power, and money! The other side NEVER gives up and sooner or later they get what they want. Ask anyone if they think Miami is congested, has too many people, and does not need a couple more dozen developments and they will say unequivocally yes to all three. So you would think with that type of overwhelming consensus on these issues, that would drive local politics, but in the end, they just don't give a crap because we do not count until election time and people then buy the same hollow promises. As a supreme optimist all of my life this is one reality that makes it hard to be optimistic and imagine that Florida will be a better place to live in 10, 20 or 30 years. And for you guys who are new here and say, 'well it's a lot better than NJ or NY' you may be right but check back with me once you are here a decade or two ...as for me I am following Olly
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Old 06-21-2019, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by reef time View Post
Point of information: Fort Lauderdale Mayoral and City Council races are non-partisan; candidates cannot disclose or promote party affiliation by law.
This does not mean that affiliations do not exist...
Guarantee they're Republican shills. They almost always are. Corruption is drawn to the party, since it's tolerated and celebrated there.
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Old 06-21-2019, 01:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Jsepulveda View Post
Guarantee they're Republican shills. They almost always are. Corruption is drawn to the party, since it's tolerated and celebrated there.
In this case you are incorrect. https://www.fortlauderdale.gov/gover...ity-commission Google these people and see where they stand on issues.
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