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Foundation crack/leaks into basement, tips on how to repair

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Foundation crack/leaks into basement, tips on how to repair

Old 03-18-2019, 08:58 AM
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Default Foundation crack/leaks into basement, tips on how to repair

I have a 16 year old poured concrete foundation.

I have dug out both of the cracks, about 66" or 5 1/2' down.

A few months ago I had tried to seal the cracks from the inside with some conncrete foundation sealer, like 3m 4000(should have used 5200)from Home Depot and while it slowed and made the leak in the front of the house smaller, it did nothing for the crack at the rear of the house. I had realized that I needed to dig out the crack to get at the root of the problem.

I have seen these injection systems where a 2 part epoxy is injected into the cracks.

1. What should I use for the outside of the crack to seal that up?, I doubt I can slide a dime into the crack or, if would just fit if I could.

2. Should I seal from the inside as well to guarantee the seal from both sides?

3. When all sealed, what should I backfill the hole with?, sand, crushed stone? The dirt that had come out seemed like it had a lot of clay in it and NOT sand.
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Old 03-18-2019, 09:00 AM
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You should find out why they cracked and fix that first.
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Old 03-18-2019, 09:03 AM
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Need to deal with it outside, as you know. Preventing water build up and pressure as well by installing a french drain or drains, first one at the footer. Hydraulic cement for the crack, and then either foundation sealer or a Grace Ice and water shield type product. Backfill carefully so as not to scratch through the sealing materials.
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Old 03-18-2019, 09:20 AM
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do you have one of the connecticut crumbling foundations made with faulty concrete? if so, you may be screwed.
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Old 03-18-2019, 09:38 AM
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I had a guy trench out the cracks to create a channel to essentially let the water in. He then drilled a hole in the basement floor and attached a 1/4 round piece of PVC pipe to the basement wall and through the hole in the floor. This "channel" allows the water in, but forces the water into the drain tile along the bottom of the foundation into the sump pit.

My belief is that allowing the water in keeps the walls from getting bowed. And costs less than $1,000 to do this.
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Old 03-18-2019, 10:07 AM
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Originally Posted by thundra View Post
I have seen these injection systems where a 2 part epoxy is injected into the cracks..
That is what you want and you want to do it from the outside.
I personally would steel brush the crack and wash it out if I can see dirt in it, then let dry before injecting it.
After the injection has set I would apply a couple of coats of tar to the wall 2 ft each side as a minimum and what would be best would be to tar the whole wall and water membrane the whole wall to seal out any further occurrences. Water membrane = Delta Dorken or similar product.
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Old 03-18-2019, 10:31 AM
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Once you get the crack filled, I'd look at using a product such as Hydrostop BarrierGuard or similar competitor's product on the outside.
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Old 03-18-2019, 10:35 AM
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I'm no expert so i will only offer up my own experience - i had a crack in my foundation wall that only leaked once in the 3+ years i lived in the 20 yr old house and only after torrential rain in a short period overwhelmed the soil. Luckily it was in the un-finished mechanical area. I didnt have the opportunity to dig it from the exterior so i went with the interior 2 part foam injection. i prob got it on amazon. I had to install nozzles every 12 inches or so on the crack and then use this special tar-like stuff (part of the kit) to seal them into place and along the entire length of the inside. The two part foam fits into a single caulk gun and the trick is to push the foam mix until it starts to pour from the next highest nozzle. It seemed to work well, i just never knew if there was a void on the exterior eating up the foam. I ran out of foam before i got to the last nozzle but that was only 9-12 inches below ground level. The foam leaked in a few spots as it expanded because of my shitty tarring work. Since then we've had some bad storms that in my opinion dropped a similar amount of rain and the fix has held up. No issues.
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Old 03-18-2019, 10:46 AM
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I had two cracks develope from an earthquake several years ago. My builder used an injected epoxy to fill the cracks. First he coated the inside of the crack with a fast drying epoxy and installed injection points every several inches. Once that was dry he used the injection points to pump epoxy into the crack. It worked great. It’s been several years and no more leaks. This was on a newer home that was built with a draintile system that drains into a sump pump. I have seen amazon selling these kits like was used in my house. I think it’s worth a try if the crack isn’t too severe.
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Old 03-18-2019, 01:23 PM
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This company sells epoxy repair kits and also a stainless bolt stitching system. If you can expose it outside that would be your best option as well as checking drainage in that area.

https://aquabondadhesives.com/concre...-repair-system
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Old 03-21-2019, 07:14 AM
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Thanks all, for the great advice and suggestions.

I'm going to wait until it warms up a bit as the temps here in MA are only in the 40's at best and it still gets below freezing at night.

I'm going to have to dig out a larger area around the exterior crack, just to be able to reach the bottom of the crack as most of the H2O ingress is now at the bottom of the wall, great, more digging but at least the hard part of getting the crack exposed is done.

I'm going to do it all, seal with the injection-stuff on both the inside and outside and for the outside I'll put some hydraulic cement over the injections, is that a good idea?

I will also spread the stuff 2-3' away from the crack and also get some physical barrier to put up before backfilling the hole.

Lastly, what should I fill the hole back up with? Sand? Crushed stone?
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Old 03-21-2019, 08:10 AM
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Is your property sloped or flat? Good drainage away from the house in all directions? If this is on the uphill side of the house you need to find a way to reduce the water build up - french drain. Back fill with compacted dirt. Sand or gravel will hold more water.
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Old 03-21-2019, 08:56 AM
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It is definitely the problem in my backyard. About 20 yards behind the house, there is a slope that is about 10 yards high that plateaus to the very top of the massive hill the neighborhood is on. It is this slope that has all the water draining down onto the flat that is about 10 yards to the foundation of the house.

All that water coming down for years and years, freezing and thawing, it is no wonder that a leak had sprung.

My wife and I did talk about making a waterbar to divert the water coming down and getting to the foundation as that will do well to help the solution of no more water getting into the basement.

The house, that was new in 2003, only has about 11-12 years left before our youngest daughter graduates high school so I just need to keep the basement dry for 12 more years-ha!
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Old 03-21-2019, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by skibum View Post
Is your property sloped or flat? Good drainage away from the house in all directions? If this is on the uphill side of the house you need to find a way to reduce the water build up - french drain. Back fill with compacted dirt. Sand or gravel will hold more water.
Compacted dirt, gotcha. and thanks.

Not sand or gravel(shows how much I don't know).
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Old 03-22-2019, 05:08 AM
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Originally Posted by thundra View Post
I have a 16 year old poured concrete foundation.

I have dug out both of the cracks, about 66" or 5 1/2' down.

A few months ago I had tried to seal the cracks from the inside with some conncrete foundation sealer, like 3m 4000(should have used 5200)from Home Depot and while it slowed and made the leak in the front of the house smaller, it did nothing for the crack at the rear of the house. I had realized that I needed to dig out the crack to get at the root of the problem.

I have seen these injection systems where a 2 part epoxy is injected into the cracks.

1. What should I use for the outside of the crack to seal that up?, I doubt I can slide a dime into the crack or, if would just fit if I could.

2. Should I seal from the inside as well to guarantee the seal from both sides?

3. When all sealed, what should I backfill the hole with?, sand, crushed stone? The dirt that had come out seemed like it had a lot of clay in it and NOT sand.
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Old 03-22-2019, 05:11 AM
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No idea why I can't post attachment.
Go to epoxy products and look at water gard 300.
Very good product.
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Old 03-22-2019, 05:32 AM
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Mr. Happy Crack, they were on Jay Leno b/c of their name. Anyway, they fixed a foundation crack that developed as the house settled, I'm original owner. It was seeping water into my finished basement. They used the epoxy injection and fixed it first time, dry as a bone and guaranteed. I located the crack and opened up the wall as well as put it back together so the cost was minimal, couple hundred buck. It been many years and still dry.

https://www.thecrackteam.com/
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