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Racoons acting strangely.

Old 03-15-2019, 12:27 PM
  #21  
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they may or may not be rabid but the ought to be dead.
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Old 03-15-2019, 12:29 PM
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Originally Posted by EMC Pursuit View Post
One of the first signs is daylight venturing and they WILL act normal the few first days/weeks as the disease progresses. Then become more and more aggressive and loss of fear of predators (including humans, we are predators in the long run). Frothing and writhing is the absolute last stage.
lol well i guess everything around my house should be dead by now! id bet $20 they are perfectly normal coons! not saying not to be cautious but to kill them just because they are out in the day is a little trigger happy!

it is a sign but it does not mean it is 100% going to be rabies! as it says simple a sign that it could be! as of 2014 approx. 2000 cases of coons with rabies and has been steadily declining from its highest point mid 90's of almost 6000 cases. you also have a better chance of getting rabies from a bat!


People and rabies

Given all the media attention that rabies receives, it may be somewhat surprising to learn that very few people die from rabies nationwide each year. There are fewer than three fatalities each year nationwide, on average.

People who contracted rabies in the United States were mostly infected by a bat. Most didn’t even know they were bitten. Some may have been sleeping when bitten. Others handled a bat bare-handed without realizing they’d been potentially exposed to rabies. But don’t panic over every bat sighting. Less than one-half of one percent of all bats in North America carries rabies.

Although raccoons suffer from rabies more than any other mammal in the United States (about 35 percent of all animal rabies cases), only one human death from the raccoonstrain of rabies has been recorded in the United States.
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Last edited by Rolandt03; 03-15-2019 at 12:39 PM.
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Old 03-15-2019, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Rolandt03 View Post
lol well i guess everything around my house should be dead by now! id bet $20 they are perfectly normal coons!

it is a sign but it does not mean it is 100% going to be rabies! as it says simple a sign that it could be!
I did an edit. Long of short, I would err on the side of caution. Remember OP is in Michigan, not Florida
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Old 03-15-2019, 12:36 PM
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We see them on the farm often. If they don't immediately run away they get shot and buried.
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Old 03-15-2019, 12:41 PM
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We've got coons that come out during the day to feed at local FF parking lots when there's enough food.
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Old 03-15-2019, 12:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Rolandt03 View Post
lol well i guess everything around my house should be dead by now! id bet $20 they are perfectly normal coons! not saying not to be cautious but to kill them just because they are out in the day is a little trigger happy!

it is a sign but it does not mean it is 100% going to be rabies! as it says simple a sign that it could be! as of 2014 approx. 2000 cases of coons with rabies and has been steadily declining from its highest point mid 90's of almost 6000 cases. you also have a better chance of getting rabies from a bat!


People and rabies

Given all the media attention that rabies receives, it may be somewhat surprising to learn that very few people die from rabies nationwide each year. There are fewer than three fatalities each year nationwide, on average.

People who contracted rabies in the United States were mostly infected by a bat. Most didn’t even know they were bitten. Some may have been sleeping when bitten. Others handled a bat bare-handed without realizing they’d been potentially exposed to rabies. But don’t panic over every bat sighting. Less than one-half of one percent of all bats in North America carries rabies.

Although raccoons suffer from rabies more than any other mammal in the United States (about 35 percent of all animal rabies cases), only one human death from the raccoonstrain of rabies has been recorded in the United States.
I am not worried about getting rabies myself. Human transmission if EXTREMELY rare, But I love my Dogs, my rabbits and have had to put down a dog that got into a raccoon.
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Old 03-15-2019, 12:53 PM
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Set a have-a-heart trap with 4 marshmallows before dark and you will have a raccoon in the morning. Remove in anyway that your conscience and the law sees fit. Repeat until problem solved.
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Old 03-15-2019, 01:05 PM
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I see them during the day all the time. They're usually after my persimmon tree. Had a mother with 3-4 babies nesting in a pine tree in the backyard last year. They don't bother me and I don't bother them.
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Old 03-15-2019, 01:33 PM
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Just get yourself a broom stick and back it into a corner.
Had a customer do that when he found one in his attic
165 stitches in his neck and face ! He swore that **** flew .
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Old 03-15-2019, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by EMC Pursuit View Post
I did an edit. Long of short, I would err on the side of caution. Remember OP is in Michigan, not Florida
oh yes def be cautious!
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Old 03-15-2019, 01:49 PM
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Originally Posted by drowning shrimp View Post
Just get yourself a broom stick and back it into a corner.
Had a customer do that when he found one in his attic
165 stitches in his neck and face ! He swore that **** flew .
we have one that will drag a 50 gallon heavy duty plastic garbage can 1/2 full across the yard! biggest damn **** i have ever seen!
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Old 03-15-2019, 01:55 PM
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Old 03-15-2019, 01:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Rolandt03 View Post
raccoons are routinely out in the daytime. and if they are use to people being close by they wont run from you. sounds like a routine day around my farm. when you see a rabid one, you will definitely know something is wrong

Raccoons are primarily nocturnal. Not to say you might see them out in the daytime. Nursing female raccoons you most likely will see

https://www.raccoonatticguide.com/rabies-vector.html
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Old 03-15-2019, 02:06 PM
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Shoot it and then call in that you found a dead one on your place.
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Old 03-15-2019, 02:13 PM
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We have lots of raccoons here. See them often during the day. Especially now, spring time.

I leave em be mostly, but if they don't run when I let my dogs out, I shoot them. Usually they will scamper up a plum or apricot tree and wait and chatter at the dogs. But when they don't run, they get gone.

Raccoons are badasses and you don't want your dogs tangling with them.

I have 3 large property dogs that will kill them, but they always are hurt in the scuffle. These are big, outside dogs. Cane Corso crosses. My house dogs are just labs and goldens and they wouldn't stand a chance.

Careful with your dogs, regardless of rabies or not.
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Old 03-15-2019, 02:19 PM
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Careful with your dogs, regardless of rabies or not.[/QUOTE]

What breeds of dogs would stand a chance? Pitbull?

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Old 03-15-2019, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by niteatnicks View Post
Careful with your dogs, regardless of rabies or not.
What breeds of dogs would stand a chance? Pitbull?[/QUOTE]

Monty, My Sheltie Collie has killed more coons than I can remember. But he was one of the smartest dogs I have ever had. He also had a habit of bringing possums in the dogie door.
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Old 03-15-2019, 02:31 PM
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I had a possum in the yard mid-day that was foaming at the mouth and stumbling around. Subsonic .22 round behind the ear works great in residential area.
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Old 03-15-2019, 02:32 PM
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As the disease progresses they'll constantly stare at the sun.
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Old 03-15-2019, 02:37 PM
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