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Is noise like water?

Old 03-14-2019, 06:14 PM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by TUNEE View Post
Buy a Bosch dishwasher ...ZERO NOISE DURING OPERATION! Case Closed
this ^^ mine has a light that shines on the floor so you know itís running, zero noise.
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Old 03-15-2019, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by MSChE View Post
Realize the decibel scale is not linear it is logarithmic. 110 dB is twice as loud as 104 dB.
Yeah I know it's logarithmic. And the spread is more like 10 db than 6.....but who's counting.

Originally Posted by TUNEE View Post
Buy a Bosch dishwasher ...ZERO NOISE DURING OPERATION! Case Closed
I just returned "two" Bosch SHPM98W75N 39 db(A) dishwashers because they wouldn't run below 42 db(A). So I'm not jumping all over your claim to their greatness!
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Old 03-15-2019, 11:04 AM
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Water is composed of matter. Air, the atmosphere, is also matter. Sound (noise) is a form of energy, not matter. So the simple answer to your question is "No". Sound waves can however be propogated through air or water as well as solid matter (Laennec, the inventor of the stethoscope, used solid pieces of wood to auscultate heart sounds, but found wood tubes, i.e. piece of wood with a hollow center, worked better. But the earpiece on his stethoscopes were still solid wood).
Cliff notes: Air and water = matter. Noise/sound = energy. Energy is not the same as matter, but the two are related if you throw in the square of the speed of light, relatively speaking.
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Old 03-15-2019, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by TUNEE View Post
Buy a Bosch dishwasher ...ZERO NOISE DURING OPERATION! Case Closed
This ^^
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Old 03-15-2019, 05:50 PM
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A lot of technical BS here that means nothing except that some people have too much time on their hands to be able to respond. Who's catching fish???
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Old 03-16-2019, 12:20 AM
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Originally Posted by greenjeepcherokee View Post
A lot of technical BS here that means nothing except that some people have too much time on their hands to be able to respond. Who's catching fish???
I didn't catch any fish yesterday but I did cook at home for the Miss's birthday bacon wrapped scallops, deep fried squid and pan fired Pickerel.
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Old 03-16-2019, 04:34 AM
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Originally Posted by TUNEE View Post
Buy a Bosch dishwasher ...ZERO NOISE DURING OPERATION! Case Closed
^^^ Same here, ours is within 20' of open space to our living area and can't hear the thing running.
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Old 03-16-2019, 06:14 AM
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Originally Posted by flcatcher1 View Post
Water is composed of matter. Air, the atmosphere, is also matter. Sound (noise) is a form of energy, not matter. So the simple answer to your question is "No". Sound waves can however be propogated through air or water as well as solid matter (Laennec, the inventor of the stethoscope, used solid pieces of wood to auscultate heart sounds, but found wood tubes, i.e. piece of wood with a hollow center, worked better. But the earpiece on his stethoscopes were still solid wood).
Cliff notes: Air and water = matter. Noise/sound = energy. Energy is not the same as matter, but the two are related if you throw in the square of the speed of light, relatively speaking.
I don't exactly agree. The only difference between water and air is the density...both are "liquids". Sound creates an energy wave..sound "leaks" just like water leaks. Sound is absorbed by mass, so are waves in water.
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Old 03-16-2019, 06:20 AM
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Originally Posted by km1125 View Post
Yes, it certainly can be directed. Look at the audio tubes used on old ships. Just a pipe from the helm to the rudder or engine room and you'd yell in one end to "talk" to the person on the other end.

There are also many examples of focusing sound. Look at the arch at the old rail station in St Louis. Whisper at one end and someone can hear you clearly about 50' away, as if they were standing right next to you.
That is true, but unlike water (or any fluid) you canít contain it entirely. In both of your examples, to someone standing next to the person talking, the voice would be just as loud. So only part of the energy is being directed. It still is transmitted 360 degrees from the source.
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Old 03-16-2019, 06:57 AM
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
I don't exactly agree. The only difference between water and air is the density...both are "liquids". Sound creates an energy wave..sound "leaks" just like water leaks. Sound is absorbed by mass, so are waves in water.
Which part donít you agree with? Water and air are both fluids. Apart from density, they also differ in that air is compressible and water is not.

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Old 03-16-2019, 07:13 AM
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Originally Posted by andosan View Post


Which part donít you agree with? Water and air are both fluids. Apart from density, they also differ in that air is compressible and water is not.

I guess the issue is..does sound leak thru like water? Yes..sound propogates thru air..the air leaks just like water leaks. You don't see or hear air leaks..you do see water leaks. No air leak, no sound leak.
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Old 03-16-2019, 07:21 AM
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If we are actually talking about reducing the sound of a dishwasher.....just tell her to sh......never mind.

In one house I have quiet appliances, in the other one standard models, what a difference. I put the quiet models in about ten years ago, they are very quiet, it’s a night and day difference.

If you want to reduce the sound of a dishwasher, just buy a model designed for it, this is the easiest and cheapest method.

Last edited by ondarvr1; 03-16-2019 at 08:20 AM.
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Old 03-16-2019, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
I don't exactly agree. The only difference between water and air is the density...both are "liquids". Sound creates an energy wave..sound "leaks" just like water leaks. Sound is absorbed by mass, so are waves in water.
I don't exactly agree; water is hydraulic, air is not.
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Old 03-16-2019, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by mikefloyd View Post
I don't exactly agree; water is hydraulic, air is not.
Sure, air is hydraulic (fluid) in many aspects. Look at our friend Bernoulli.
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Old 03-16-2019, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
Sure, air is hydraulic (fluid) in many aspects. Look at our friend Bernoulli.
Water does not compress; air does.
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Old 03-16-2019, 09:19 AM
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Originally Posted by mikefloyd View Post
Water does not compress; air does.
True, but they are both fluids.
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