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Recommend me a Kindle book I can't put down...

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Recommend me a Kindle book I can't put down...

Old 02-12-2019, 01:44 PM
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Default Recommend me a Kindle book I can't put down...

To help you guys pick for me, I love fantasy series, WW1 and WW2 historicals, suspense fiction, biographies, etc...Books I have LOVED:
Lord of the Ring Series
Chronicles of Thomas Covenant
Game of Throne Series
The Stand by Stephen King
Life by Kieth Richards

Right now I'm either reading or just finished :
3 part series on Winston Churchill - The Last Lion (It's OK but a little too detailed)
Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan (Average but not as good as I hoped for)
Mr. Mercedes Trilogy by Stephen King (Ok but disappointed)

Basically, I haven't been happy lately with my book choices and want one that keeps me engrossed. Would really love a series....
Choices?
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Old 02-12-2019, 01:47 PM
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I had to put down wheel of time it just meandered too long...

Robin Hobbís Elderling series is fantastic... itís basicaly four separate trilogies...

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Old 02-12-2019, 01:55 PM
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Anything by George MacDonald Fraser
the Flashman series
the MacAuslen books
his memoir of WWII service in the Burma theater
the Border Reiver books.

One of the best writers of the 20th century
and totally politically incorrect. by todays standards
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Old 02-12-2019, 01:55 PM
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Lost at Sea...Patrick Dillon


On February 3, 1983, the men aboard Americus and Altair, two state-of-the-art crabbing vessels, docked in their home port of Anacortes, Washington, prepared to begin a grueling three-month season fishing in the notorious Bering Sea. Eleven days later, on Valentine's Day, the overturned hull of the Americus was found drifting in calm seas, with no record of even a single distress call or trace of its seven-man crew. The Altair vanished altogether. Despite the desperate search that followed, no evidence of the vessel or its crew would ever be found. Fourteen men were lost. And the tragedy would mark the worst disaster in the history of U.S. commercial fishing.
With painstaking research and spellbinding prose, acclaimed journalist Patrick Dillon brings to life the men who were lost, the dangers that commercial fishermen face, the haunting memories of the families left behind...and reconstructs the intense investigation that ensued, which for the first time exposed the dangers of an industry that would never again be the same.

and..


Undersea Warrior: The World War II story Of "Mush
" Morton and the USS Wahoo.


Among submariners in World War II, Dudley "Mush" Morton stood out as a warrior without peer. At the helm of the USS Wahoo he completely changed the way the sea war was fought in the Pacific. He would relentlessly attack the Japanese at every opportunity, going through his supply of torpedoes in record time on every patrol. In only nine months, he racked up an astounding list of achievements, including being the first American skipper to wipe out an entire enemy convoy single-handedly.


And.The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors: The Extraordinary World War II Story of the U.S. Navy's Finest Hour

“This will be a fight against overwhelming odds from which survival cannot be expected. We will do what damage we can.”

With these words, Lieutenant Commander Robert W. Copeland addressed the crew of the destroyer escort USS Samuel B. Roberts on the morning of October 25, 1944, off the Philippine Island of Samar. On the horizon loomed the mightiest ships of the Japanese navy, a massive fleet that represented the last hope of a staggering empire. All that stood between it and Douglas MacArthur’s vulnerable invasion force were the Roberts and the other small ships of a tiny American flotilla poised to charge into history.

In the tradition of the #1 New York Times bestseller Flags of Our Fathers, James D. Hornfischer paints an unprecedented portrait of the Battle of Samar, a naval engagement unlike any other in U.S. history—and captures with unforgettable intensity the men, the strategies, and the sacrifices that turned certain defeat into a legendary victory.

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Old 02-12-2019, 02:10 PM
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Along the same lines as The Stand, have you read "Swan Song" by Robert McCammon?

Also, one of my favorites from Robert McCammon is "The Night boat."
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Old 02-12-2019, 02:19 PM
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For fantasy series:
Anything by Brandon Sanderson - especially the Stormlight Archives 3 books so far out of 10. Each about 1000 pages
Dagger and the Coin series by Daniel Abraham
Mark Lawrence - The Broken Empire series and The Red Queen's War series
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Old 02-12-2019, 02:23 PM
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Unbroken
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Old 02-12-2019, 02:26 PM
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I like Micheners stuff. Some of them are hard starters but then impossible to put down once you're into the characters and history. Chesapeake, Texas and Alaska would be my first choices to start. But tales of the South Pacific would satisfy your WWII thirst. They are mostly historically accurate but done with
fictitious characters.
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Old 02-12-2019, 02:31 PM
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Penthouse and Hustler are good reading material if you're into fantasy.
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Old 02-12-2019, 02:33 PM
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Dark Noon by Tom Clavin. True story about a headboard that went down off of Montauk.

Shadow Divers by Robert Kurson. True story about a German u-boat found off of Jersey that wasnít documented to be in that area.
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Old 02-12-2019, 03:55 PM
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Chronicles of Thomas Covenant ...great series. If you like that, try the Apprentice Adept series by Piers Anthony..the Dragon Lance series by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman...Running with the Demon series by Terry Brooks (others by him too)...River God series by Wilbur Smith..Sign of the Seven series and Morrigan's Cross series by Nora Roberts...When the Wind Blows, Acceptable Risk.......
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Old 02-12-2019, 03:55 PM
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Originally Posted by mbg75 View Post
Dark Noon by Tom Clavin. True story about a headboard that went down off of Montauk.

Shadow Divers by Robert Kurson. True story about a German u-boat found off of Jersey that wasnít documented to be in that area.
Both are great recommendations.
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Old 02-12-2019, 03:59 PM
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Originally Posted by RivaHaven View Post
For fantasy series:
Anything by Brandon Sanderson - especially the Stormlight Archives 3 books so far out of 10. Each about 1000 pages
Dagger and the Coin series by Daniel Abraham
Mark Lawrence - The Broken Empire series and The Red Queen's War series
I read one of that Sanderson series and I am just waiting for a few more I donít feel like waiting like Song of Fire and Ice


OP- I found this Reddit thread to be insightful and I keep revisiting when I want to find new books

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.red...ampf=undefined

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Old 02-12-2019, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by JCC123 View Post
Unbroken
this is an incredible story I had a hard time even comprehending how a person could accomplish, persevere, and survive what that guy did. I know it became the book that everyone was reading but it really was that incredible.
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Old 02-12-2019, 04:54 PM
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Originally Posted by johnb48 View Post
Chronicles of Thomas Covenant ...great series.
I read that series about 20 years ago when they had six books and I loved it. Then it went dead for 20 years and I never picked it back up. I'd have to read the entire series again to refresh myself and I decided to simply say screw it. Same way with the Game of Thrones series. After that fiasco with Martin I promised myself that I would never read another fantasy series unless the entire series was already finished. My memory sucks bad enough now and I simply can't wait years between books....
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Old 02-12-2019, 04:59 PM
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The Troupe by Robert Jackson Bennett for fantasy.

Check out Stephen King's son, Joe Hill. His book NOS4A2 or Heart Shaped Box. The guy can write and I give him credit for hiding his identity through his first few books so everyone knew he wasn't riding daddy's coattails.

Dan Simmons historical fiction is amazing. The Terror for maritime/exploration historical fiction mixed with folklore. Drood for the mysteries and ghostly days of Charles Dicken's life in the British underworld. The Abomiable for an AMAZING historical fiction account of what possibly happened on the Mallory ascent of Everest which also provides some insight and realistic suggestion to the lore of The Abominable Snowman.
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Old 02-12-2019, 05:08 PM
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Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett if you can get it on Kindle. Big story. Several of Folletts works are in that can't put down category. If you could get it as an audible I would recommend Alaska Blues if you are a fisherman. Great story about one mans experience in the Alaskan Salmon fishery and really easy reading.
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Old 02-12-2019, 05:13 PM
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Tai-pan and King Rat by James Clavell.
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Old 02-12-2019, 05:14 PM
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Originally Posted by sammythetuna View Post



I read one of that Sanderson series and I am just waiting for a few more I donít feel like waiting like Song of Fire and Ice


OP- I found this Reddit thread to be insightful and I keep revisiting when I want to find new books

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.red...ampf=undefined
The Mistborn series was pretty good. I think there was the original trilogy, then the Wax & Wayne trilogy, then finish it off with "Secret History".
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Old 02-12-2019, 05:24 PM
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Ken Follett was a great recommendation the series that starts with the Pillars of Earth is really good. If you like WW1 and WW2 check out his century trilogy, 3 books that cover WW1 through the end of the Cold War. They cover the century through the view of a handful of international families. Great books, book 1 is called Fall of Giants.
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