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Buying Organic foods from the grocery

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Buying Organic foods from the grocery

Old 02-11-2019, 06:12 PM
  #21  
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Hope those who buy “organic” feel better, but I doubt most people know what little it takes for makers to call their crap “organic”. Same with cage free, free range, etc.
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Old 02-11-2019, 06:43 PM
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Is there inspectors that prove items are organic? I never buy organic how can you be sure it's really organic?
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Old 02-11-2019, 06:54 PM
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Originally Posted by sinjun View Post
Is there inspectors that prove items are organic? I never buy organic how can you be sure it's really organic?
https://www.ams.usda.gov/services/organic-certification

We try to buy organic produce and "natural" (not strictly organic, free range, etc) chicken mostly because we feel they taste better. Have to say we also think Costco's or Sam's organic hamburger tastes superior as well.
Seldom buy "organic" other stuff unless the price differential is minimal.
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Old 02-11-2019, 07:06 PM
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I buy organic any time I can. Free range chicken eggs too. Am I going to live longer or be healthier? Who knows. But I enjoys the thought of healthier food.
I treated myself bad for years and smoked lots of cigarettes. Bad desisions I have to live with.
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Old 02-11-2019, 07:44 PM
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It’s a bunch of bullshit
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Old 02-11-2019, 09:15 PM
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Originally Posted by sinjun View Post
There is definitely room for abuse outside the certified products and you preferably would know where the food is really coming from.Is there inspectors that prove items are organic? I never buy organic how can you be sure it's really organic?
There will be national and/or state bodies that provide certification. The level of inspection can vary, but it is usually pretty intensive for the ones I have seen at least. Most of the information you need to check is probably online. Just note the details on the certification label and check them out online. You will soon workout what you trust or don't.
The 'scam' part can be where something might be referred to as organic without actually being 'Certified Organic'. Some people are definitely trying to get a free ride on the organic train and higher margins for 'normal' goods. On the other hand, a farmer for instance might follow organic principles but the farm might have a prior history of fertilizer or spraying which may take a few years to 'clean' before getting certification. Sometimes shown as organic in transition or similar. Personally I will support this and buy. It is still better to me than a crop that has just been doused in RoundUp. Sometimes you will also see stuff in the 'organic' markets that is labelled 'spray free'. This is generally again someone who has farmed organically but not asked for or received organic certification. Technically though they could have applied chemical fertilizers, but mostly I find they are on the organic path.
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Old 02-11-2019, 09:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Aliboy View Post
There will be national and/or state bodies that provide certification. The level of inspection can vary, but it is usually pretty intensive for the ones I have seen at least. Most of the information you need to check is probably online. Just note the details on the certification label and check them out online. You will soon workout what you trust or don't.
The 'scam' part can be where something might be referred to as organic without actually being 'Certified Organic'. Some people are definitely trying to get a free ride on the organic train and higher margins for 'normal' goods. On the other hand, a farmer for instance might follow organic principles but the farm might have a prior history of fertilizer or spraying which may take a few years to 'clean' before getting certification. Sometimes shown as organic in transition or similar. Personally I will support this and buy. It is still better to me than a crop that has just been doused in RoundUp. Sometimes you will also see stuff in the 'organic' markets that is labelled 'spray free'. This is generally again someone who has farmed organically but not asked for or received organic certification. Technically though they could have applied chemical fertilizers, but mostly I find they are on the organic path.

it takes 3 years in Alberta to turn your farm from conventional to organic and a shit load of paper work.

Theres really no way to check if your wheat is organic or not. Unless you desiccate with Round up your not going to get caught. Hell I have sold wheat seed that was conventional to organic guys.

Its a niche market
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Old 02-12-2019, 03:46 AM
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Originally Posted by sharktripper View Post
The only organic product I actually believe in is milk. It lasts weeks longer than “regular” milk.
some does, some does not.
Some Trader Joe milk has really short sell by dates. like a week.
Walmart usda organic milk has a much longer (better)) sell by date usually .
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Old 02-12-2019, 04:16 AM
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Just my 02 cents worth, a lot of my buddies grow their own stuff and then share it out at work, some of it is not nice looking as what is at the store, but it tastes SO much better, everything is organic, they´re too mean to buy pesticides, fertilizer is horse or goat poo! Tomatoes, greens, fruit all just grown naturally, maybe that's the difference, organic vs natural.
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Old 02-12-2019, 04:54 AM
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Organics are a scam! Just watch one of the many documentaries on this.
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Old 02-12-2019, 05:06 AM
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I wouldn't waste my money on "organic" from any of the chain stores.

From the small stalls at the farmers market...maybe.
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Old 02-12-2019, 05:12 AM
  #32  
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I intentionally avoid spending money on anything labeled organic or non-gmo.
Marketing bullshit to pull more money out of our pockets.
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Old 02-12-2019, 05:16 AM
  #33  
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As I stated in my earlier post, I rent farmland to a friend who does organic farming. The fields surround my house. So I am a daily witness to what he has to do to maintain the USDA Certified Organic status. It's definitely not bullshit (though, if he had access to bullshit, he'd might use it on his land if it otherwise met the requirements for maintaining his certification). Farmland that has been used for conventional farming has to be transitioned to organic. It takes three years (three years of organic farming) before USDA will certify it as organic. He has to keep buffers around his organic fields to prevent his crops from being contaminated by drifting chemicals. Everything he uses has to meet the "organic" criteria (he can't even use chemical fertilizer). He gets inspected pretty regularly. He's invested too much time and effort into getting his certification to blow it by trying to "cheat" the system. His crops are generally smaller, his fields have more weeds, and his produce isn't always as "pretty" as conventionally grown crops. But they taste ten times better, and I know exactly how they were grown (not merely because there's a certification, but because I see how the crops are cultivated).

My fields have, in the past, also been used for conventional farming. So I've seen and smelled the chemicals that are used in conventional farming, and I've seen their impacts in my yard when those chemicals drift or "wander." There was a chemical years ago, Command, that would seem to evaporate off the crops and drift around and affect woods, landscaping, gardens, etc. "Command Injury" was easy to detect, because it turned plants white. That, and the defoliants used in cotton farming, was what increased my motivation to have my land farmed organically.

There are some terrible chemicals used in farming. If eating USDA certified organic produce minimizes my family's exposure to those chemicals, it's a good thing. The fact that organic produce tastes better and stays fresh longer is another undeniable benefit.
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Old 02-12-2019, 05:21 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Capt Grady 23 Gulfstream View Post
Congrats smart buying guys. I am 76** years young, no scripts, doctor just told me after hospital tests "you have the heart of a 21 year old".

Perfect blood pressure all my life, low pulse rate(relaxed), etc. thanks to vegan diet, mostly organic food, very little dairy products, soy meats, only natural meat is WILD caught Alaskan salmon, no farm raised seafood of any kind allowed. No shell fish due to cholesterol and gout.

Don't get caught up with "it's too late", it's not.]
Healthy as a horse, right up until the day he hung himself... I’m not here for a long time, I’m here for a good time!

(seriously though, congrats on your good health and lifestyle)
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Old 02-12-2019, 05:24 AM
  #35  
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I've read enough to sound ignorant trying to explain but apparently organic, as much as I hate to admit it, can be beneficial. It's one of the ways listed to prevent/avoid oxidative stress and free radicals in the body. Supposedly it has to do with insecticide, chemicals, etc used for growing plants, feeding livestock, etc.. Whether its true or not, I have no clue.
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Old 02-12-2019, 05:51 AM
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Originally Posted by lps View Post
As I stated in my earlier post, I rent farmland to a friend who does organic farming. The fields surround my house. So I am a daily witness to what he has to do to maintain the USDA Certified Organic status. It's definitely not bullshit (though, if he had access to bullshit, he'd might use it on his land if it otherwise met the requirements for maintaining his certification). Farmland that has been used for conventional farming has to be transitioned to organic. It takes three years (three years of organic farming) before USDA will certify it as organic. He has to keep buffers around his organic fields to prevent his crops from being contaminated by drifting chemicals. Everything he uses has to meet the "organic" criteria (he can't even use chemical fertilizer). He gets inspected pretty regularly. He's invested too much time and effort into getting his certification to blow it by trying to "cheat" the system. His crops are generally smaller, his fields have more weeds, and his produce isn't always as "pretty" as conventionally grown crops. But they taste ten times better, and I know exactly how they were grown (not merely because there's a certification, but because I see how the crops are cultivated).

My fields have, in the past, also been used for conventional farming. So I've seen and smelled the chemicals that are used in conventional farming, and I've seen their impacts in my yard when those chemicals drift or "wander." There was a chemical years ago, Command, that would seem to evaporate off the crops and drift around and affect woods, landscaping, gardens, etc. "Command Injury" was easy to detect, because it turned plants white. That, and the defoliants used in cotton farming, was what increased my motivation to have my land farmed organically.

There are some terrible chemicals used in farming. If eating USDA certified organic produce minimizes my family's exposure to those chemicals, it's a good thing. The fact that organic produce tastes better and stays fresh longer is another undeniable benefit.
This almost falls into the category of "grow your own". You see what's going on there and almost have control of it. The question is really for those that have to purchase at the store. Are you comfortable that anything marked 'organic' or 'certified organic' is close to the stuff you're buying from that farm?
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Old 02-12-2019, 05:53 AM
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Originally Posted by edwardh1 View Post
some does, some does not.
Some Trader Joe milk has really short sell by dates. like a week.
Walmart usda organic milk has a much longer (better)) sell by date usually .
I wonder about this. Twinkies seem to last forever too, but that's not necessarily a good sign.

If the milk due to just a different pasteurization process?? I've seen both 'organic' and regular milk that doesn't even have to be refrigerated due to the processing. Is that actually better or worse than milk that expires normally??
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Old 02-12-2019, 06:01 AM
  #39  
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I don't disagree with either of these. But, like I said, I witness firsthand the difference between how organic crops are grown on my farmland, and how conventional farming is done. The difference is dramatic. Maybe it's just that my farmer is particularly conscientious. For example, rather than using a pre- or post- emergent herbicide, he's got a 6 row propane torch that scorches the earth between the rows to kill weeds and weed seeds. It leaves no chemical residue, and there are no chemicals to drift to other areas. He also uses a lot of labor to chop the fields. The assertion that farmers, including organic farmers, are just going to douse their crops in chemicals ignores the fact that these chemicals are expensive, and profit margins are low. But conventional chemicals are cheaper than organic chemicals, so the incentive to use less chemicals is greater in organic farming.

You should definitely thoroughly wash any produce you eat, whether it's organic or not. Also, don't buy organic if you're only doing it to "save the planet." Because it takes more land to produce the same amount of crop, organic is probably only marginally better from an environmental standpoint (i.e. using less chemicals might mean using more fuels to cultivate your crops). Conventional farming is how we feed the world. Organic farming may be how you choose to feed your family. If you're smart about it, you can't go wrong with selecting some organic produce over non-organic.
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Old 02-12-2019, 06:07 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by km1125 View Post
This almost falls into the category of "grow your own". You see what's going on there and almost have control of it. The question is really for those that have to purchase at the store. Are you comfortable that anything marked 'organic' or 'certified organic' is close to the stuff you're buying from that farm?
To some degree, yes. I know how much farmers invest in trying to obtain USDA certification. It's expensive and time consuming. Once they have that certification, they have an incentive to follow the rules so that they keep it. We've got at least two certified organic farms in my community, and the farmers who do it are serious about it. My farmer calls it his "labor of love" (and he's no softy liberal tree hugger). The other big organic farmer in our community is sort of an eccentric guy who very much believes in what he's doing, and produces some amazing and unique crops (he grows kale, beets, garlic, shiitake mushrooms, bok choy, and various herbs, among other things). Neither of these guys are getting rich growing organic crops.

My farmer grows some produce, but he mostly grows organic cotton that he processes for use in vaping/e-cigarettes, organic soy beans, and organic sweet corn and feed corn (he mills the feed corn into organic stone ground cornmeal and grits at his own mill).
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Last edited by lps; 02-12-2019 at 06:13 AM.
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